Scammers Posing as Travel Agents Targeting School TripsCivil Conversation in an Angry

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first_imgScammers have recently been posing as travel agencies in order to use school-related trips to steal thousands of dollars from teachers, children, and their parents.The thieves pose as legitimate websites, but eventually they will ask for some amount of money up front.“In the end the scammers get away with the money fronted for the trip.” said the BBB’s Tyler Russell, “No one is the wiser until the students show up, bags packed, only to find out their flights or hotel reservations never actually existed.”Russell advises doing thorough research before giving any money to a potential travel agency.“If you’re contacted by a travel agency unsolicited, be wary.” explained Russell, “Watch out for those too good to be true items. Also, do your research. If you’re hiring a company, investigate them thoroughly. Pay attention to the details.”Always use your credit card when making these type of purchases. They offer more protection by allowing you to dispute fraudulent charges if necessary.last_img read more

Old Stories New Lives

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first_imgby, Jeanette Leardi, ChangingAging ContributorTweet9Share50Share7Email66 Shares Rosina LeardiI come from a family that loves to hear and tell stories. My mother, who taught me how to read, also made it a point to share with me her love of old movies. Some of my fondest childhood (and adult) memories of her are of curling up together on a sofa, watching Rick bid goodbye to a tearful Ilsa as she boarded the plane out of Casablanca, Dorian Gray defiantly stab his terrifying portrait, Rhett carry a struggling Scarlett up the grand staircase, and Norma Desmond descend her staircase for the last time.So nothing seemed unusual that day, when I was in my 30s and she in her 60s, as we watched her favorite actor, John Garfield, being seduced by Lana Turner in “The Postman Always Rings Twice.” Nothing, that is, until my mother absentmindedly blurted out, “You know, John Garfield once told me that I could act.”“WHAT?”“John Garfield said I had real talent. He told me I’d make a good actress.”Stunned, I immediately turned away from the TV and demanded to hear the whole story.It was 1938. Garfield, who had been appearing on Broadway in “Golden Boy,” visited his old junior high school, P.S. 45 in the Bronx, and dropped in on an acting class taught by his favorite teacher, Margaret O’Ryan. My mother happened to be onstage delivering some lines from that year’s hit play, “Our Town,” and he sat in the back of the room and listened to her. Then he came up to her and delivered those words she cherished for the rest of her life. John GarfieldThirty years after hearing her story, I find that what stuns me more than this revelation is the fact that it took all those years for her to mention what was clearly a significant moment in her life. And to say it in a way that was almost an afterthought. Did she think no one would find that exchange remarkable? Or had she chosen to repress for years the memory of a thwarted ambition? More than anything else my mother later said or did, that disclosure forever changed my understanding of who my mother was, expanding my perceptions of her beyond the role of wife and mother and into a person independent of my identity, in her own right. And it had a lasting positive effect on our relationship.My mother has long since gone, yet I continue to be amazed and humbled by the stories I hear older adults tell about their lives. I listen to them whenever I can; most often I get the chance during the journaling and memoir writing classes I teach to elders. I encourage my students to use their compositions to transform feelings of reticence and vulnerability into those of empowerment and wisdom. And I’ve been privileged to witness more than one powerful catharsis.One such reaction overcame an octogenarian woman who throughout her life in the States harbored a fear of being discovered as the daughter of a Nazi soldier, despite the fact that he deserted and defected to Switzerland by stealing a German officer’s motorcycle and making a “Great Escape” of his own. In sharing her story with the class, she found acceptance and even admiration for her emotional endurance. As she read her essay through tears, she found healing. And as we listened, we learned more about what it means to be human.Most older adults, I suspect, are yearning to share their life stories with others. The tragedy in our society (a disgrace, really) is that we often deny them opportunities to do so. Or we minimize the value of what we hear. How might their lives be enriched if they knew that others were truly interested in what they experienced and the lessons gleaned from them? Moreover, how might our lives be enriched by those stories and lessons?I’m now as old as my mother was when she told me the John Garfield story. And while so far nothing in my life can compare with that tale, maybe someday I’ll get a chance to tell about the summer day in New York City when I ran into (literally collided with) ballet great Mikhail Baryshnikov at the doorway of a newsstand/candy store as I was entering and he was rushing out to hail a cab. Holding me to steady us both, he asked me if I was all right and then complimented me on my “dancer’s muscles.” I never saw my body in the same way again.I’ll look forward to telling that one.Related PostsTweet9Share50Share7Email66 SharesTags: Journalinglast_img read more

Study shows lack of followup care for patients with concussion

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first_img Source:https://www.usc.edu/ May 25 2018Millions of Americans suffer concussions each year, and many endure symptoms for months or years afterward. A new study shows that a majority of patients with a concussion receive no follow-up care within three months of discharge from the hospital.Based on a sample of 831 patients sent to a top-level trauma center with a concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), a national collaboration of researchers found that 47 percent reported that they were given educational materials about TBI when they were discharged, and just 44 percent saw a physician or other provider within three months of their injury.”The lack of follow-up after a concussion is concerning because these patients can suffer adverse and debilitating effects for a very long time,” said Seth Seabury, a lead author of the study and director of the Keck-Schaeffer Initiative for Population Health Policy at the USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics. “Even patients who reported experiencing significant post-concussive symptoms often failed to see a provider. This reflects a lack of awareness, among patients and providers, that their symptoms may be connected to their brain injury.”The study was published on May 25 by JAMA Network Open and listed 65 co-authors from across the United States. The research was based on data from the ongoing Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury study, or TRACK-TBI. Supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the NIH, the TRACK-TBI study has collected detailed information, including CT/MRI imaging, blood biospecimens and detailed clinical outcomes, for more than 2,700 brain injury patients from 18 different U.S. sites.Most cases of traumatic brain injury are classified as a concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury. However, the term “mild” can be misleading. People can have significant post concussive symptoms, such as migraines, cognitive issues, vision loss, memory loss, emotional distress or personality disorder.”For too many patients, concussion is being treated as a minor injury,” saidRising public awareness of traumatic brain injury According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 3.2 million to 5.3 million Americans live with long-term health effects of traumatic brain injury. TBI resulted in 2.8 million emergency department visits in 2013. Annual direct and indirect costs estimated at over $76 billion, according to TRACK-TBI.In addition, TBI has affected, since 2000, nearly 380,000 active-duty service members, most of whom have had mTBI, according to the U.S. Department of Defense.”In light of the high-profile issues with TBI around football and the military, there is increasing awareness that concussions are an important public health problem,” Seabury said.Related StoriesStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpThe researchers noted in the paper that persistent symptoms can be debilitating in many ways for patients. They are linked to an increase in medical expenses and — in some cases — job loss, homelessness and incarceration.”The focus of concussion has been directed at a very narrow segment of the population — football players and professional athletes,” said Manley, a professor of neurosurgery at the University of California-San Francisco department of neurological surgery. “Everyone who falls off their bike, slips off their skateboard or falls down the steps needs to be aware of the potential risks of concussion.”Some patients with positive CT scans received no follow-upFor the study, USC and UCSF scientists examined data on TRACK-TBI patients aged 18 and older who were enrolled in the study between Feb. 26, 2014, and Aug. 25, 2016. The data included such medical information as CT scan results, injury characteristics and the patients’ admission score on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS).The GCS scores range from 3 to 15, from severe to mild, and is intended to rate the consciousness of patients who have suffered an acute brain injury. Patients in the study had GCS admission scores of 13 to 15.The patients completed surveys about their follow-up care at two weeks and three months post-discharge. The researchers also assessed the severity of their symptoms such as headaches, dizziness, sleep issues, and other physical symptoms that may occur after a concussion.The researchers found a gap in care even for 236 patients (28 percent of the sample) whose head CT scans indicated that they had a lesion, a sign of brain injury. Approximately 40 percent of those patients did not see a physician or other health provider three months after discharge, the researchers found.Also, 279 patients (34 percent of the sample) had three or more moderate to severe post-concussive symptoms three months post-discharge, which should be examined by provider. But only 52 percent of them had a follow-up visit, the researchers found.They acknowledged some limitations to the study, including that the patients had suffered concussions and, in some cases, may not provide reliable recall of any follow-up care. They also noted the study sites–Level 1 trauma centers that are all affiliated with university hospitals–may not be nationally representative. However, the authors note that these hospitals would typically be expected to do a better job of providing care, suggesting the gaps in follow-up care for a patient in more underserved communities might be even worse than reported here.”The study shows that we need to give patients and doctors the tools to better identify who should be going in for follow-up care,” Seabury said.last_img read more

NeuroTrauma Sciences and Henry Ford join hands to advance exosome technology

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first_imgJul 16 2018NeuroTrauma Sciences, LLC (NTS), a biopharmaceutical company, and Henry Ford Health System, a non-profit organization, today announce that a newly-formed subsidiary of NTS has entered into multi-year Sponsored Research and License Agreements. The new company is named NeurExo Sciences, LLC (NXS) and its goal is to advance Henry Ford’s pioneering technology involving exosomes as extracellular vesicles enriched with microRNA for the purpose of treating stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI) including concussion, and neuropathies.Under the Agreements, NXS will license methods and intellectual property (IP) from Henry Ford and fund exosome research projects headed by principal investigator Michael Chopp, Ph.D., Vice Chairman, Department of Neurology, Scientific Director, Neurosciences Institute, at Henry Ford Hospital. NXS will gain worldwide commercial rights to product candidates resulting from the IP and sponsored research coming out of the lab.Related StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injurySlug serves as ‘command central’ for determining breast stem cell healthRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaDr. Chopp and his research team have generated proof-of-principle data in a number of small and large animal models showing how exosomes can amplify the body’s own neurological repair mechanisms and potentially improve long-term neurological outcomes following brain injury, such as stroke or TBI, and neurodegenerative diseases (link to Dr. Chopp’s research here).”Our studies in multiple pre-clinical models indicate that exosomes have the potential to provide significant therapeutic benefits to enhance the recovery from stroke or traumatic brain injury, and potentially with a better safety profile and greater efficacy than their parent or progenitor cells,” said Dr. Chopp. “Success of this novel approach may lead to a shift in the treatment paradigm for TBI, stroke and neurological disease.””We are delighted to collaborate with Dr. Chopp and his research team to advance the next generation of cell-based therapies,” said Carl Long, NeuroTrauma Sciences and NeurExo Sciences Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer. “We believe that exosome technology has the potential to serve as a transformational platform for multiple neurological conditions – including stroke, concussion and other traumatic brain injuries – and NeuroTrauma Sciences is excited to be a part of it.””Henry Ford researchers are pioneers in the exosome field and the NeuroTrauma Sciences team recognized the tremendous potential of our technology and world leading scientists,” said Mark Coticchia, Vice President & Chief Innovation Officer of Henry Ford Health System. “We appreciate their support in pursing the development of this cutting-edge technology with these Agreements, and their commitment to investing in the broader Detroit scientific community with the formation of this new company.” Source:https://www.henryford.com/last_img read more

Take our weekly quiz on the benefit of parasitic worms animals that

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first_img Seminal vesicles Journal fee interception Small intestines The Science Quiz Advertising for dark chocolate After nearly 2 decades of deliberations, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just approved a genetically modified version of this organism for the market: Score Wagyu cattle Top Ranker Password theft And in another piece of chimpanzee news, scientists have discovered one reason humans can outlearn chimps. Why? Start Quiz Pigeons 18,500 years old. In a find that’s igniting controversy in the field, archaeologists working near the southern tip of Chile have uncovered what they say are the oldest stone tools in the Americas—a set of 39 artifacts including a stone “chopper.” If verified, the finding would push back the earliest evidence for the peopling of the Americas by nearly 4000 years. You Create a TNT-sensing earthworm Pigeons. It may sound like a bird-brained idea, but scientists have trained pigeons to spot cancer in images of biopsied tissue. Individually, the avian analysts can’t quite match the accuracy of professional pathologists. But as a flock, they did as well as trained humans, detecting cancerous cells 99% of the time, according to a new study. But that doesn’t mean you’ll see them wearing white coats any time soon—in addition to missing out on some important clinical knowledge, they also seem to be lacking a certain bedside manner. Time’s Up! Make an electricity-conducting rose Click to enter Zebra tomatoes Standardized testing A leaked memo that came to light last week revealed that the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) is effectively ending support for research on this animal: Which animal has been shown to spot cancer as well as human experts? Bumblebees Increase agressiveness Atlantic salmon What working tissue have scientists grown in the lab for the first time? In a GMO workaround, Swedish researchers used organic electronics to do what? Make an electricity-conducting rose. A group of Swedish researchers last week said they had hijacked the vascular transplant system of a rose to craft a flexible electronic circuit. This “flower power,” which doesn’t have to clear the same regulatory hurdles as genetic engineering, is still young. But eventually such circuitry may help farmers eavesdrop on their crops and even control when they ripen. And if that isn’t creepy enough (for the plants, that is), the advance could one day allow people to harness energy from shrubs and trees by plugging directly into their photosynthesis machinery. Spider monkeys Average Chimpanzees. Since the NIH announced it would phase out most chimpanzee research in 2013, not a single scientist has applied to use the remaining 50 research chimps kept by the agency. That was a deciding factor behind the decision to retire the chimps, says NIH head Francis Collins. “Given this complete absence of interest in a space now approaching 3 years, I think it’s fair to say the scientific community has come up with other ways to answer the kinds of questions they used to ask with chimpanzees.” An error occurred loading the Quiz. Please try again later. Vocal cords 0 Advertising for dark chocolate. That trick is so old hat. What the URL-snatchers are after is worth more than a little bit of notoriety: A growing slice of the $10 billion academic publishing pie comes from “gold” open-access publishing, in which authors of accepted papers pay up front for their publication. Several of the 24 hijacked sites were charging would-be authors for publication and would-be subscribers for access, whereas others were advertising payday loans and cures for baldness. The takeaway for publishers? Stop being careless about website administration and security. Dogs Chimpanzees Beefalo How did you score on the quiz? Challenge your friends to a science news duel! 10,500 years old Increase fertilitycenter_img Macaws Results: You answered out of correctly – Click to revisit Nephridia Decrease libido Question Produce a bioluminescent tomato Spider monkeys Cats Increase muscle strength Scientists have figured out how to foil a deadly fungus that infects which animal? Increase fertility. Parasitic worms bore into our organs, steal our nutrients, and sup on our blood—but their effects aren’t all harmful. A new study of people living in the Amazon rainforest suggests that certain intestinal worms can increase the number of babies women give birth to. How? By tweaking the immune system much like a human fetus, one species of roundworm reduces inflammation in its host, promoting conception and implantation of the embryo in the womb, scientists say. Where’s Ridley Scott when you need him? Less intense fight-or-flight responses 0 / 10 Thicker corpus callosums 18,500 years old Parrots In an exclusive Science investigation of “hijacked” scientific journals—those that have had their URLs stolen and repurposed—reporter John Bohannon found all but one of the following to be taking place: 23,500 years old November 23, 2015 The Science Quiz Take the quiz to enter for a chance to win a FREE Science t-shirt! Learn More Atlantic salmon. A fast-growing salmon developed by AquaBounty Technologies became the first genetically modified animal to win the blessing of FDA last week. Its approval, nearly 20 years after the biotech company first approached the agency, marks the end of a long struggle for the right to sell the fish in grocery stores. But it probably doesn’t mark the end of a contentious debate over its safety. Research has shown that it doesn’t pose a threat to human health, but many stores—including Target, Trader Joe’s, and Whole Foods—have said the “Frankenfish” won’t be gracing their shelves any time soon. 5500 years old mason01/iStockphoto Promotion of payday loans Toads. In a major coup, scientists have eliminated a deadly fungus on the Spanish island of Mallorca. Chytrid fungus, which has killed off amphibians all over the world, was set to annihilate the endangered Mallorcan midwife toad. But by applying high-strength disinfectants and airlifting tadpoles to safety over 5 years, biologists eradicated the fungus from the mountain ponds where the species has been clinging to survival. Though repeating the victory may not be easy, or even possible, the findings offer rare good news in the fight against a pathogen that has been a worldwide catastrophe. Cockatoos More flexible brain genetics. Compared with most other animals, chimpanzees are incredibly intelligent: They work with tools, communicate with complex vocalizations, and are good problem-solvers. But as smart as chimps are, their brain power pales in comparison with our own. A multitude of factors help makes the human brain superior to the chimps’, but new research indicates that looser genetic control of brain development in humans allows us to learn and adapt to our environment with more flexibility than our primate cousins. So now you’ve got even less of an excuse for those SAT scores! LOADING Bats A new study shows that, aside from feasting on their insides, some parasitic worms do this to humans: More flexible brain genetics “Electrify” a nonelectric eel The faster you answer, the higher your score! Share your score Simply enter your email here for the chance to win a free Science t-shirt! I understand that by entering this sweepstakes I am agreeing to receive occasional email or other contact from Science/AAAS about its respective programs and products. Science/AAAS agrees not to rent, sell, exchange, or give your information to any third party without permission. Last week, archaeologists claimed to have found the oldest stone tools in the Americas. How old are they? Toads Official rules for the News from Science weekly quiz sweepstakes Win a FREE Science t-shirt! Each week, we give one winner a free Science t-shirt! Just submit your email to enter. New winners are chosen each week, so if you’re not lucky this week, try again next week! Vocal cords. For the first time, scientists have created vocal cord tissue made with cells from actual human vocal cords. When tested in the lab, the bioengineered tissue vibrated—and even sounded—similar to the natural thing. What’s more, researchers were able to create nearly 170 artificial cords of different sizes using cells from just five sets of real cords. The development could one day help those with severely damaged vocal cords regain their lost voices. Still unknown is whether it can help the likes of Justin Bieber. November 23, 2015 Enter your email address to enter the sweepstakes: Your email has been submitted. An error occurred submitting the email. Please try again later. This email has already been entered. The email submitted is not a valid email. Submit Terms and Conditionslast_img read more

Bulldozers threaten what may be the worlds oldest animal fossils

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first_img Z. YIN ET AL., PNAS 112, 12 (MARCH 24, 2015) © NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email By Kathleen McLaughlinApr. 20, 2017 , 9:00 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country BEIJING—Paleontologists have argued for years about the identity of the enigmatic curling shapes and embryolike spheres found in the 600-million-year-old rocks of the Doushantuo Formation in China. But some say those fossils, no bigger than a grain of salt, may be the remains of some of the world’s first animals. Now researchers fear that the rock formation may be pulverized, along with its cargo of fossils, before scientists can identify the creatures and what they may reveal about the evolution of animals. A massive phosphate mining operation in southern China threatens the site, and scientists are urging the Chinese government to step in to protect it.The mining operations, which produce raw material for fertilizer, are already destroying unique fossil evidence at a distressing rate, says Zhu Maoyan, fossil expert and professor at the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology in China. The site, with its mysterious Weng’an biota, is located in rural Guizhou, a Chinese province bordering Vietnam. Piecemeal phosphate mining has taken place there for years, but a large-scale project that began in 2015 could wipe out the entire site, including a wealth of as-yet-undiscovered fossils—a “disaster [to] all human beings,” Zhu says. The mining project already has demolished one of the three key fossil sites, he says.”If you want to know about how animals evolved on Earth, this site is the most important one we know of,” says David Bottjer, earth sciences professor at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, who has been visiting the Weng’an site to collect fossils since 1999, a year after their discovery. “If this fossil deposit is lost, we will lose this unique window on evolution of life, which may never be replaced.” Bulldozers threaten what may be the world’s oldest animal fossils This tiny tubular creature, only half a millimeter across, was unearthed at the Weng’an site and may be the world’s oldest sponge. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) ZHU MAOYAN Weng’an fossils—putative embryos and occasional adults—lived 30 million years before the oldest widely accepted animals: the Ediacaran biota found in Newfoundland, Canada, and other sites. Those sea creatures, which come in an array of bewildering shapes, represent a lost era of life on Earth: They were later replaced during the Cambrian Explosion, when animals with more familiar body plans burst onto the scene. As precursors to the Ediacara, the Doushantuo fossils “provide an unparalleled window into the early evolution of lineages leading to animals and possibly [the evolution of] animals themselves,” says Douglas Erwin, a paleobiologist at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. Chinese mining operations at the Weng’an fossil site threaten to obliterate 600-million-year-old rocks. The phosphate coveted by miners also helped preserve the ancient fossils. Bottjer explains that after the organisms died, phosphate replaced their tissues cell by cell, yielding exquisite soft-body preservation at tiny scales. “With a focus on the embryos, we have been able to learn a lot about the developmental process for early animals,” he says. “We are just beginning to understand fossils of adult animals, which are also found but which are much rarer than the embryos.”Some scientists still maintain that the spheres and other forms represent not animals but some kind of precursor, as a paper last month in the Journal of the Geological Society argued. But a 2015 study in the journal Evolution identified an unusually well-preserved fossil as most likely being the world’s oldest known sponge.Regardless of the dispute, says Zhu, “the majority of the science community considers Weng’an’s fossils invaluable” for deciphering the origins of animals. He led a group of concerned international scientists, including Erwin and Bottjer, to meet with government officials earlier this month to appeal for curbs on the mining. Officials at all levels of government, from local to national, listened to the scientists’ concerns.The officials must balance that plea against local interests: The phosphate and fertilizer industry is the pillar of the local economy, supplying 60% of total revenue to the Weng’an county government, according to one account in Chinese media. But after the meeting, Zhu says, officials took incremental steps to protect the fossils, halting mining “in the parts of the site that are most likely to hold fossils and the most vulnerable to being dug out.” He says he believes that the government is beginning to understand the global significance of the Weng’an biota and hopes that they will act to stop mining permanently.last_img read more

Weird new form of nuclear matter might lie just beyond experimenters grasp

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first_img Within a neutron star—the remains of an exploded, middle-weight star—pressures climb a billion billion times higher than in the sun’s core. For decades, some theoretical physicists have speculated that under those conditions, a bizarre type of matter might emerge: a soup of the subatomic particles called quarks. Now, a new analysis indicates the recipe for that soup, called cold quark matter, needs revision. If correct, it suggests that particle accelerators on Earth might be able to produce stable bits of the quark matter. It also would put the kibosh on hypothetical particles called strangelets, which fearmongers once claimed could destroy the world.“It’s a speculative argument, but there is nothing obviously wrong with it,” says Robert Pisarski, a nuclear theorist at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, who was not involved in the work.Atomic nuclei consist of protons and neutrons, which themselves consist of trios of up and down quarks—two of the particles’ six “flavors”—bound tightly by the strong nuclear force. Since the 1970s, some theorists have predicted that under extreme pressures like those in the hearts of neutron stars, quarks might break free of their strong-force chains to create a soup of cold quark matter. They also predicted that the soup’s ingredients would differ from those of protons and neutrons. Their calculations suggested that to minimize its energy, quark matter should include a third flavor of quarks known as strange quarks. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Adrian ChoMay. 15, 2018 , 2:30 PM Even though strange quarks emerge only fleetingly, usually in collisions at particle accelerators, calculations suggested that such strange quark matter might have a lower energy than ordinary nuclear matter has. That means that specks of strange quark matter, or strangelets, could be stable and that, in principle, ordinary nuclei could change into them. That transformation would require simultaneous conversions of up and down quarks to strange quarks—something unlikely to happen spontaneously in the age of the universe. But strangelets generated in cosmic rays or lingering from violent astrophysical events might survive indefinitely. Scientists have searched for them in many ways, so far unsuccessfully.Now, Bob Holdom, a nuclear theorist at the University of Toronto in Canada, and his colleagues say they have banished strange quark matter with better estimates of how, through quantum effects, quarks change the energy of the vacuum of space itself, a key component of quark matter’s total energy. “Our model allows us to see how the vacuum energy depends on the flavor of the quark,” Holdom says. Mixing in strange quarks incurs a bigger energy penalty than previously thought, so high that cold quark matter should consist of just up and down quarks, the researchers report in a paper in press at Physical Review Letters.Atomic nuclei clearly don’t readily convert into up-down quark matter either. The team calculates that for masses below about 300 times that of the proton, ordinary nuclei are stable because effects akin to surface tension increase quark matter’s energy. However, if experimenters striving to make new superheavy elements could push up in mass just a bit beyond the heaviest nucleus spotted yet—oganesson, with an atomic mass of 294—then they might make stable “nuggets” of up-down quark matter, the theorists predict.Is this the end for strange quark matter? Probably not, Pisarski says. The theory of quarks is so mathematically intractable that, like everybody else, Holdom had to resort to approximate models, he says. Laura Paulucci, an astrophysicist at the Federal University of ABC in São Paulo, Brazil, adds that the analysis also doesn’t quite rule out strange quark matter in neutron stars, where the density should be significantly higher than the theorists assume. “I’m not sure the theory they’re using is adequate” for the conditions in neutron stars, she says.Still, the study may be good news for scientists hunting stable quark matter, says Evan Finch, an experimenter at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven who has searched for strangelets by running moon dust through a mass spectrometer and looking for particles with odd charge-to-mass ratios. “There’s a suggestion that maybe we’ve been looking in the wrong place” for quark matter, he says. “I’m a bit skeptical, but it’s fun.”The new picture of cold quark matter could also dispel a far-fetched threat to the world. Opponents of the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland had argued that the atom smasher might produce negatively charged strangelets that would gobble up positively charged atomic nuclei in a runaway process. Physicists had countered that if such a catastrophe were possible, strangelets from space would have long since consumed the planet. Up-down quark matter would definitively rule out the doomsday scenario: It should be positively charged and repel atomic nuclei.Still, a nugget of the stuff could be useful, Holdom says. Bombard it with neutrons and it would convert them to quark matter while generating energy, he predicts. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Weird new form of nuclear matter might lie just beyond experimenters’ graspcenter_img At its center, a supernova remnant contains a neutron star, thought to contain a soup of quark matter. A new study suggests the soup may lack strange quarks. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Image: (X-ray) NASA/CXC/University of Amsterdam/N. Rea et al.; (Optical) DSS last_img read more

Central Park Jogger Praised Cases Racist Prosecutors

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first_imgAva DuVernay‘s “When They See Us” has people revisiting how the so-called Central Park 5 — Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana, Antron McCray, Yusef Salaam and Korey Wise — endured hell for years after being wrongfully accused of raping Trisha Meili in April of 1989. While the victim has not spoken out since the miniseries premiered on Netflix, she recently made comments doubting the innocence of the young, even after they were exonerated and received a settlement of over $40 million.  Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family A Disturbing Timeline Of 4-Year-Old Maleah Davis Going Missing After Being Left With Her Stepfather Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ See Also: A Timeline Of Dallas Cop Amber Guyger Killing Botham Jean In His Own Home Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice.center_img Derion Vence, Maleah Davis, Brittany Bowens More By NewsOne Staff Back in July, in an interview with the New York Daily News, Meili said she did not believe the children were wronged by the NYPD or the Manhattan DA’s office.“When that lawsuit was settled, it gave some the impression that the detectives and the prosecutors had acted improperly and I’d like to see it be acknowledged that there wasn’t a violation of (the teens’) civil rights,” she said at the time.Even though there was zero DNA that linked the five children to her and there was DNA that linked Matias Reyes, the man was confessed in 2002, Meili said she was still unsure if the admitted rapist committed the crime, describing him as a “pathological liar.”She also claimed the settlement for the boys was political.“I was shocked and somewhat disgusted and really so disappointed that the case against the city claiming the detectives and prosecutor had acted improperly … that it was settled for what seems to me like a campaign promise from then-candidate Bill de Blasio,” she said at the time.It didn’t stop there.She also previously complained to ABC News about the settlement and praised the prosecutors.“I so wish the case hadn’t been settled,” Meili said in January. “I wish that it had gone to court because there’s a lot of information that’s now being released that I’m seeing for the first time. I support the work of law enforcement and prosecutors. … They treated me with such dignity and respect.” SUBSCRIBE While Meili was a victim and no one should have to suffer what she went through, the children were also victims and not treated with any dignity or respect.Meili said she has no memory of what happened that night.Former Manhattan District Attorney’s Office prosecutor Linda Fairstein, who is played by Felicity Huffman in the film, is now being slammed for lying on the five innocent children.All five of the boys were exonerated by the New York Supreme Court in 2002. Sadly, even with all the facts, which includes a confession and DNA evidence, their innocent was still being doubted.Watch the powerful trailer for “When They See Us” below, which is available on Netflix.SEE ALSO:‘It’s Above Me Now’: Hotel Clerk’s Video With Racist Guest Goes Viral‘Who Said I Can’t Say Ni**a?’: Blackface Video Of High School Student Sparks Outrage Central Park 5 , Linda Fairstein , Manhattan District Attorney’s Office , When They See Us last_img read more

Starving children often dont recover even when fed enough Restoring their gut

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first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Even after starving children get enough to eat again, they often fail to grow. Their brains don’t develop properly, and they remain susceptible to diseases, even many years later. Two studies in Science this week now suggest fostering the right gut microbes may help these children recover. The work also pinpoints combinations of foods that nurture the beneficial microbes.Most of the experiments were in animals, but a small group of malnourished children given those foods also showed signs of improvement. “This is an outstanding and extremely comprehensive study,” says Honorine Ward, a microbiologist and global health expert at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston. Tailoring food aid to foster the microbiome “could be a key to new strategies for improving global public health and human potential,” adds David Relman, a microbiologist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California.Tahmeed Ahmed, director of nutrition research at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, in Dhaka, has tried for 30 years to help malnourished children recover better. About a decade ago, he was intrigued by work by Jeffrey Gordon at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, linking certain gut microbes to obesity. The two scientists wondered whether the microbiome—the set of microbes living in and on the human body—might also play a role in obesity’s opposite number, malnutrition. By Elizabeth PennisiJul. 11, 2019 , 2:00 PMcenter_img MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP/Getty Images A child in Bangladesh gets measured to assess malnutrition. Starving children often don’t recover, even when fed enough. Restoring their gut bacteria could help Together, their teams reported in 2014 that the gut microbiome normally “matures” as an infant grows into a toddler. They also noticed that it remains immature in severely malnourished children, dominated by bacteria found in younger healthy children. Two years later, the researchers put mature and immature microbiomes from children into mice raised without microbes. Animals given the immature microbiomes put on less muscle, had weaker bones, and had impaired metabolisms, suggesting a mature microbiome might be needed for proper development.To pinpoint which among the microbiome’s hundreds of strains are linked to maturation, Arjun Raman, a postdoc in the Gordon lab, analyzed data from fecal samples that Ahmed’s team had collected monthly from 50 healthy infants in Bangladesh as they grew. Raman identified 15 types of bacteria that increased and decreased in concert as the microbiome matured. He and the team saw the same pattern in healthy children from Peru and India and even in germ-free piglets given the bacteria and eating the same food as the Bangladeshi infants and children, they report in Science.Fostering or suppressing those microbes could be key to helping children recover from malnutrition, the researchers thought. To test that idea, they needed a way to monitor recovery. Looking for a molecular signature of healthy growth, a graduate student in Gordon’s lab, Jeanette Gehrig, and colleagues monitored more than 1000 proteins and metabolites, such as fatty and amino acids, for ones that change as healthy children grow and malnourished ones recover.Gehrig and the rest of the team then tested the effects of various foods on mice and piglets whose microbiomes had been transplanted from malnourished infants. They hoped to find foods that could “encourage catchup growth in the microbiota,” Gordon says. Milk powder and rice, standard components of food aid, did little to foster maturation, but chickpea, banana, and soy and peanut flours helped the microbiomes mature.The researchers then fed mice and piglets supplements that combined all four foods and saw that the animals’ microbiomes matured, and their growth improved. “This study points to the importance and utility of thoughtfully selected nutrients to support key members of a microbiota,” Relman says.As a final proof of principle, Ahmed, Gordon, and their colleagues compared their supplements to standard recovery fare in about 60 malnourished Bangladeshi children for 1 month. That was too little time to assess long-term physical recovery, but long enough to see effects on the molecular signatures in the blood. Only the four-food combination sharply improved those signatures, they report in Science. It also improved the 15 bacteria Raman’s team linked to maturation.The results suggest a way to improve nutrition even in well-fed children, in whom a poor diet can lead to an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, and other diseases as adults. “If caregivers know the best foods to feed their children to support the development of their gut microbiota, we could potentially prevent undernutrition and immature microbiota to begin with,” Gehrig says.Relman and others are more cautious, particularly because it’s not clear the mature microbiomes will persist in malnourished infants who ate the supplements. Chris Damman, a senior program officer at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, Washington, which funded the work, says, “I wouldn’t say this is ‘the future’ or ‘the cure-all.’ But it’s certainly an exciting lead and one that we think has promise.”Back in Bangladesh, Ahmed is coordinating an effort to provide the microbe-boosting diet and others to a larger group of malnourished children. The team will follow the children for 3 months, long enough to see whether the beneficial effects translate into healthy development. He’s hopeful, he says, that “this can be a game-changer in the treatment of malnutrition.”last_img read more

Drones disrupt flights at Singapore airport for second time in a week

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first_img Indian-origin banker gets 13 years in jail for forgery, cheating in Singapore By Reuters |Singapore | Published: June 25, 2019 8:41:10 am Drones disrupt flights at Singapore airport for second time in a week A similar incident involving drone flying affected 38 flights on Tuesday and Wednesday last week. (Source: File Photo)Unauthorised drone flying caused the second spate of delays and flight diversions in less than a week at Singapore’s Changi airport on Monday night, the city-state’s aviation authority said. SBI plans tapping Singapore SME businesses Singapore’s factories go no-frills as trade war hits demand Around 18 departures and arrivals were delayed and seven flights were diverted from the global transit hub due to “bad weather and unauthorised drone activities”, the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore said in a statement on Tuesday.A similar incident involving drone flying affected 38 flights on Tuesday and Wednesday last week.Authorities are investigating.A surge in the availability of drones has become an increasing security concern for airports around the world.In December, drone sightings caused three days of travel chaos at London’s Gatwick airport, resulting in the cancellation or diversion of about 1,000 flights at an estimated cost of more than 50 million pounds ($64 million). Advertising Related News Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Chinese man gets death for killing wife hiding body in freezer for

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first_imgZhu Xiaodong, 30, spent nearly 150,000 yuan (USD 21,800) from his wife Yang Liping’s credit card on traveling with another woman for “trying to forget about the killing”, state-run China Daily reported. Yang, 30, was the only child of her parents.Zhu appealed against the death sentence handed down by the Shanghai No 2 Intermediate People’s Court in August.The Shanghai Higher People’s court on Friday confirmed the sentence, the report said. He purchased the freezer, which was used to preserve his wife’s body, online on September 22. He claimed that he bought it to store meat for his pet snakes, lizards, and frogs. But Yang’s family believed it was a premeditated murder.After Yang’s death, Zhu traveled to Hainan province, Nanjing and Xuzhou cities in Jiangsu province and South Korea in a bid to “trying to forget about the killing”.He used her credit cards for luxury goods and daily expenses. He used Yang’s ID card to check into hotel rooms along with another woman. He was convicted for strangling Yang during an argument on October 17, 2016, at their home in Hongkou district 10 months after they tied the knot, the court said.Zhu, a clerk at a clothing store, hid the body of the woman, a former primary school teacher, in a freezer in the balcony for 106 days, the report said.During the period, he logged into the social networking accounts of his wife and replied to text messages she received from her parents and friends, according to the court.Zhu surrendered before police accompanied by his parents on February 1 after realising he could no longer hide the truth as the couple was asked to attend the father-in-law’s birthday dinner that evening, the report said. India’s broken criminal justice system cannot support the death penalty Muzaffarnagar: 7 awarded death sentence for killing one nine years ago Related News By PTI |Beijing | Published: July 5, 2019 2:43:21 pm After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Post Comment(s)center_img China brushes off international concern over death sentence for Canadian Best Of Express Advertising Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence China death sentence, china man convicted, shanghai court, china court, shanghai death sentence, world news, Indian Express The Shanghai Higher People’s court on Friday confirmed the sentence, the report said.(Illustration: Suvajit Dey)A court in China’s Shanghai on Friday upheld the death sentence given to a man for killing his wife and hiding her body in a deep freezer for over 100 days. Advertisinglast_img read more

Somalia extremist attack in port city of Kismayo kills 10

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first_img Advertising Related News Explained: Is Somalia ready for a one-person one-vote election? Somalia security forces end militant attack on hotel that killed 13  Somalia, Somalia attack, Kismayo, Kismayo attack, Somalia attack death, Al-Shabab, Al-Shabab attack, World news, Indian Express, latest news The attack started with a suicide car bomb blast and then gunmen stormed into the hotel. Somalia’s al-Shabab Islamic rebels have claimed responsibility.At least 10 people, including two journalists, were killed in an extremist attack Friday on a hotel in the port city of Kismayo, a Somali official said. Mogadishu-based independent radio station Radio Dalsan confirmed to The Associated Press that Canadian journalist Hodan Nalayeh and her husband, Farid Jama Suleiman, died in the attack.“I’m absolutely devastated by the news of the death of our dear sister Hodan Nalayeh and her husband in a terrorist attack in Somalia today. What a loss to us. Her beautiful spirit shined through her work and the way she treated people,” Omar Suleiman, a Texas-based imam who knew the victim, wrote on social media.Nalayeh was born in Somalia in 1976, but spent most of her life in Canada, first in Alberta and then in Toronto. She founded Integration TV, an international web-based video production company aimed at Somali viewers around the world. She was the first Somali woman media owner in the world. Advertising By AP |Mogadishu | Published: July 13, 2019 9:57:49 am Abdi Ahmed, a local district official, told The Associated Press the death toll may rise as fighting continued inside the Asasey Hotel between the extremist gunmen and security forces. He said gunfire is continuing inside the hotel.He said most of the victims were patrons of the hotel, which is often frequented by lawmakers and local officials. He said the victims include two journalists.The attack started with a suicide car bomb blast and then gunmen stormed into the hotel. Somalia’s al-Shabab Islamic rebels have claimed responsibility. Car bomb and all-night hotel siege kill 26 in Somalia’s Kismayo Post Comment(s)last_img read more

A march in Hong Kong devolves into violence

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first_imgThe march in Sheung Shui was the latest in a series of demonstrations that have plunged the former British colony into its biggest political crisis since it was returned to Chinese rule in 1997. Opposition to a contentious bill that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China has drawn hundreds of thousands of protesters into the streets.This week, Carrie Lam, the city’s embattled leader, said the controversial bill was “dead,” but she has declined to formally withdraw it. Demonstrators say Lam’s steadfast refusal to completely retract the bill in the face of widespread opposition has undermined public trust in her leadership, fueling growing calls for her resignation. In recent weeks, protesters have also broadened their demands to include a call for greater democratic reforms in the city.Many of the protesters were residents angry with the vast numbers of “parallel traders” who come across the border from the mainland to buy items like baby formula and diapers for resale at a markup in China to evade import taxes. Local residents say the retail boom has pushed up commercial rents and forced businesses aimed at residents to relocate or close.In recent weeks, some protesters have voiced concerns that the movement’s growing demands could impact their ability to channel public support and sustain momentum. But on Saturday, several residents said the disparate demands were in fact related to a single issue.“People say it’s a different issue, one is a local problem, the other is citywide, but the root of it is rather the same,” said Gary Law, 32, who grew up in Sheung Shui. “It’s mostly about China.” Several thousand demonstrators gathered in the streets of a Hong Kong border town Saturday to protest against mainland Chinese traders, the latest effort by local activists to ride the momentum of recent mass protests in the city.What began as a peaceful protest Saturday in Sheung Shui, an area of Hong Kong close to the border with mainland China, devolved into clashes between demonstrators armed with umbrellas and police wielding batons, pepper spray and shields.Several protesters were seen being treated for injuries at the scene. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, ICJ verdict in Kulbhushan case isolates Pakistan Advertising Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post Post Comment(s) ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict Top News Advertising By New York Times |Hong Kong | Published: July 14, 2019 8:25:51 am hong kong protests, protests in hong kong, hong kong protests people arrested, china Police officers arrest a protester in Hong Kong. (AP/File)Written by Amy Qin and Ezra Cheunglast_img read more

Prosperous China says men preferred and women lose

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first_img China GDP growth slows to 6.2% in second quarter Salve hails verdict, says ICJ protected Jadhav from being executed Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post Trump says ‘will take a look’ at accusations over Google, China In a stark turnaround from the early decades of Communist rule, officials now look the other way when employers, reluctant to cover costs related to maternity leave, openly pick men over women for hiring and promotions. At home, women are increasingly disadvantaged in divorce and losing out on gains in the country’s property boom.As a result, Chinese women are being squeezed out of the workplace by employers who penalize them if they have children and by party officials urging them to focus on domestic life. At the same time, those who have managed to keep working are increasingly earning less relative to men.Mao famously told women they held up “half the sky” and outlawed arranged marriage and the practice of taking concubines. Despite political turmoil and persistent bias, Chinese women entered the workforce in record numbers, began to enjoy greater rights and were celebrated for their economic contributions.Thirty years ago, when the country first began implementing market reforms, Chinese women earned just under 80% of what men made. By 2010, according to the latest official data, the average income of women in Chinese cities had fallen to 67% that of men, and in the countryside 56%. In a break with the Marxist ambition of liberating women from patriarchal oppression, Xi has called on women to embrace their “unique role” in the family and “shoulder the responsibilities of taking care of the old and young, as well as educating children.”“No Communist leader before Xi has dared to openly say that women should shoulder the domestic burden,” Wang said.Eager to preserve the stability of the family unit, the party has also done little to help women following a recent court ruling that weakened their claim to property in divorce proceedings. And with divorce numbers on the rise, millions of Chinese women have been cut out of the nation’s real estate boom, experts say.Over the past decade, China’s ranking in the World Economic Forum’s global gender gap index has declined significantly — from 57th out of 139 countries in 2008 to 103rd in 2018.China once enjoyed one of the highest rates of female labor force participation in the world, with nearly 3 in 4 women working as recently as 1990. Now the figure is down to 61%, according to the International Labor Organization.“When it came to promoting women’s rights, China used to be in the lead,” said Feng Yuan, a feminist scholar in Beijing. “But now we are falling behind.”‘Either Way, We Will Lose’Since signing the special agreement two years ago, Wang has been terrified of getting pregnant, and for good reason: In her first months on the job, a pregnant co-worker was fired.Prosperous China says ‘men preferred,’ and women lose Since 2012, China has required companies to offer at least 14 weeks of paid leave to women having children. Fathers typically get two weeks. The disparity means help-wanted ads often openly specify “men only” or “men preferred.”Wang wanted to have a baby, too, she recalled, but signed the contract because she was excited about the job. Reporting her employer to the authorities also seemed unlikely to do much good.“I’m still a Chinese woman,” she said recently in a coffee shop in Tianjin. “Even though we have some complaints, we cannot risk bringing them up. Because either way, we will lose.”Forced to choose between career and family, Wang chose career. Many other Chinese women are dropping out of the workforce.The return of Chinese women to the home began in the 1980s, when mass layoffs at state factories meant women were often the first to be let go. It accelerated with rising expectations around child rearing.Wang Yan, 35, a stay-at-home mother in the eastern city of Yantai, said that her parents “only needed to make sure their kids weren’t hungry.”Now, facing a more competitive economy, parents, usually mothers, are expected to supervise homework, after-school tutoring and extracurricular activities — all while navigating safety scandals involving baby formula, day care and vaccinations.At work, managers are eager to rid their payrolls of women who might need maternity leave.Since 2012, China has required companies to offer at least 14 weeks of paid leave to women having children. Fathers typically get two weeks. The disparity means help-wanted ads often openly specify “men only” or “men preferred.”This is illegal, but even government agencies do it. One ministry in Beijing specified “men only” for more than half the jobs it advertised over the course of a year, an investigation by Human Rights Watch found.In an official survey in 2017, about 54% of women said they had been asked about their marriage and childbearing status in job interviews.Beijing issued a directive in February urging stronger enforcement of laws against gender discrimination. But it has not been a priority, and the party-controlled courts have not sided with women on other issues.‘A Man’s Law’When Sharon Shao approached several divorce lawyers in the spring of 2013, they all had the same advice: Don’t bother taking your husband to court. You have no hope of getting the apartment.It did not matter that she had been the primary breadwinner for most of their marriage and had made all the mortgage payments.It did not matter that he hit her. It did not matter that he had cheated on her.None of it mattered because her husband’s parents had put up the down payment and because her name was not on the property title.Under a ruling issued by China’s highest court in 2011, the lawyers said, that meant the apartment was his.For Shao, 36, who had no other home because her parents died when she was young, it was devastating. “After the divorce, I wandered around with no sense of belonging,” she said. “I was just floating.”Growing numbers of women in China have been through a similar experience. In a country where real estate accounts for over 70% of personal wealth — the high court’s ruling has been a significant setback for women.Chinese law had previously recognized a family’s home as joint property in divorce proceedings. But the 2011 ruling held that real estate purchased before marriage, either outright or on mortgage, should revert to the buyer in a divorce — and that is usually the husband.Driven by the popular belief that a woman will only marry a man if he owns a home, families often save for years to help their sons buy an apartment. Experts say the high court was responding to fears that women were using marriage to swindle their in-laws out of their savings.Though the ruling makes no distinction between men and women, it is a “man’s law,” said Lü Xiaoquan, a lawyer at Beijing Qianqian Law Firm. There are about 31 million more men in China than women, an imbalance caused by a traditional preference for sons, the one-child policy and sex-selective abortions. But Chinese women often accept marriage on unfavorable terms.One 2012 survey by Horizon China, a research firm in Beijing, found that 70% of married women contributed financially to the family’s purchases of real estate but that less than a third of home deeds included the woman’s name. Researchers at Nankai University in Tianjin in 2017 examined 4,253 property deeds and found the wife’s name listed on only about 1 in 5.These missing names have been disastrous for women in divorce proceedings since the 2011 ruling, said Leta Hong Fincher, author of a book about the subject.“The entire deck is stacked against women in so many ways,” she said.Taking cues from #MeToo activism overseas and China’s own history of feminism, some Chinese women have staged street protests and campaigns on social media for greater rights.There are also broader signs of dissatisfaction among Chinese women: The marriage rate fell last year to its lowest point since Xi took power, and the birthrate dropped to a level unseen in the 70-year history of the People’s Republic of China.The divorce rate is climbing, too, with women initiating most cases. In Beijing, authorities reported one divorce for every two marriages in 2017. Bella Wang barely noticed the section on the application inquiring whether she was married or had children. Employers in China routinely ask women such questions, and she had encountered them before in job interviews.It was a surprise, though, after she accepted a position as a manager at the company, a big language-training business in the northern city of Tianjin, when she was told the job came with a condition.As a married woman without children, she would have to sign a “special agreement” promising not to get pregnant for two years. If she broke that promise, the company said, she could be fired, without compensation. By New York Times |Tianjin | Updated: July 17, 2019 9:41:04 am ‘We’re almost extinct’: China’s investigative journalists are silenced under Xi Advertising Wang, 32, fluent in English with a degree in international trade, was outraged — but she signed.Such agreements are illegal but increasingly common in China, where discrimination against women is on the rise. From the womb to the workplace, from the political arena to the home, women in China are losing ground at every turn.Driving this regression in women’s status is a looming aging crisis, and the relaxing of the draconian “one-child” birth restrictions that contributed to the graying population. The Communist Party now wants to try to stimulate a baby boom. But instead of making it easier for women to both work and have children, China’s leader, Xi Jinping, has led a resurgence in traditional gender roles that has increasingly pushed women back into the home.“When the state policymakers needed women’s hands, they sent them to do labor,” said Wang Zheng, professor of women’s studies and history at the University of Michigan. “Now they want to push women into marriage and have a bunch of babies.” ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict Advertising “They aren’t having kids and getting married,” said Lü Pin, a prominent Chinese feminist activist. “That’s their way of pushing back.” Prosperous China says ‘men preferred,’ and women lose Wang wanted to have a baby, too, she recalled but signed the contract because she was excited about the job. Reporting her employer to the authorities also seemed unlikely to do much good. (New York Times)Written by Amy Qin Best Of Express Related News Advertising More Explained Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Chinese spacecraft successfully lands on moons far side and sends pictures back

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first_img Email By Dennis NormileJan. 3, 2019 , 4:50 AM China’s Chang’e-4 spacecraft successfully landed on the far side of the moon this morning Beijing time, accomplishing a worldwide first in lunar exploration. China’s state media confirmed that touchdown occurred at 10:26 a.m. local time; later in the day, the China National Space Administration released the first close-ups of the surface of the far side, taken by Chang’e-4 after it landed.“It’s a milestone for China’s lunar exploration project,” Yang Yuguang, of the China Aerospace Science & Industry Corporation in Beijing, told China Global Television Network, a state-operated English TV channel.The lander carries a rover that should be deployed sometime Friday. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Chinese spacecraft successfully lands on moon’s far side and sends pictures back home Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A picture of the far side of the moon taken by Chang’e 4 this morning It’s a milestone for China’s lunar exploration project. China National Space Administration Chang’e-4 was launched on 8 December 2018 from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Sichuan province. The landing site is in the Von Kármán crater in the South Pole-Aitken Basin. The basin was likely formed by a giant asteroid impact that might have brought material from the moon’s upper mantle to the surface; studying samples taken there might offer scientists the chance to learn more about the composition of the body’s interior. The moon’s far side has a much thicker, older crust and is pockmarked by more and deeper craters than the near side, where large dark plains called maria, formed by ancient lava flows, have erased much of the cratering. Chang’e-4’s observations could give clues to the processes behind the differences. The lander carries cameras for observations of the terrain and a low-frequency spectrometer to study solar bursts. The rover has a panoramic camera, a spectrometer for identifying surface materials, and a ground-penetrating radar to probe subsurface structures. Sweden, Germany, the Netherlands, and Saudi Arabia contributed payloads that will measure radiation and use low-frequency radio astronomy to listen for faint signals lingering in the cosmos since the formation of the universe’s first stars, among other things. The lander also carries a minuscule biosphere developed by Chinese universities that will study the low-gravity interaction of a number of plants and silkworms.Getting to the far side poses engineering challenges, a fact that kept all 27 previous landings on the near side. Direct communications with spacecraft on the far side are blocked by the moon itself. So in May 2018, China put a communications relay satellite called Queqiao into a loop 65,000 kilometers beyond the moon at Earth-moon Lagrange Point 2, a gravitationally balanced location from which the spacecraft can exchange signals with both Earth and the moon’s far side. So far, the relay system seems to be working well.China’s lunar program began with orbiting observatories, Chang’e-1 and -2, in 2007 and 2010, respectively. It continued with a near side lander, Chang’e-3, in 2013. (The missions are named after a Chinese moon goddess.) The country will next take on the challenge of returning samples from the moon with Chang’e-5, slated for launch later this year. The craft will attempt to retrieve up to 2 kilograms of soil and rock from the Oceanus Procellarum, a vast lunar mare on the near side that has yet to be visited by any spacecraft. China is studying possible manned moon landings for sometime after 2025. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Yang Yuguang, China Aerospace Science & Industry Corporation last_img read more

Project Second Innings In Dahod new chapter for retired teachers — and

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first_img Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Best Of Express Written by Aishwarya Mohanty | Vadodara | Published: July 15, 2019 12:43:42 am After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Then, there’s 78-year-old Natha Barjod, the “Master ji” at the primary school in Kalia Valunda village. “I retired as a school principal in 1999, and was approached by the district last year to volunteer as a tutor in my village. I get about Rs 20,000 in pension, and both my sons are working, so I don’t have anything else to worry about. I help the students here with Gujarati and Maths,” he says.The results are showing. At last year’s Gunotsav, an annual evaluation in government primary schools, 58,639 students from classes 6 to 8 in Dahod were graded below 5 on a scale of 1-10 in reading, 66,133 in writing and 67,666 in Maths. Of these students, 27,598 improved their grades this year to above 6 in reading, 28,664 in writing and 32,827 in Maths.Dahod has also climbed one rung from the bottom among 33 districts in the Secondary School Certificate (SSC ) results — from last in pass percentage (37.35%) in 2018 to one step higher (49.18%) this year.According to District Collector, Vijay Kharadi, 285 more retired teachers are being drafted, with a target of 1,000 by the year-end. “We are also looking at retired government officials based in their villages who can devote time for the project,” he says.Nodal Education Officer (Aspirational District), Janak Patel, says they pick volunteers from an updated database. “As soon as teachers retire, we approach them to teach in their own villages. If they agree, we organise classes for an hour before or after normal school hours,” says Patel. Until last year, all that 59-year-old retired teacher Lakshman Chauhan wanted to do was spend time at his “small farm” near his home in Vadela. Today, he is back in front of the blackboard at the school, happy to be conducting remedial sessions for students in need.What has brought Bhabhor and Chauhan together is Project Second Innings, launched by the Dahod administration under the NITI Aayog’s Transformation of Aspirational Districts programme. Dahod is among 117 districts identified by NITI Aayog, with education as one of the core areas of focus.The project was launched in 2018 to help improve learning outcomes in primary and upper primary classes, specifically in reading, writing and Maths. And Chauhan is among 517 retired teachers who have voluntarily signed up, so far.“I still believe in the traditional system — read, write, practise and learn. If they can learn the language well, they can read and understand other subjects, too. I continuously conduct dictations and sessions where students read out from their textbooks,” says Chauhan. District Development Officer, R K Patel, says migration is “one of the key” factors that has led to lower learning outcomes in Dahod, a tribal district. Labour records show that over 30,000 people migrate every year on an average in search of work, mostly from February to July. Of them, about 15,000 return during the monsoon but leave again by August-end.“We realised that once students go home, they don’t get help because their parents are mostly out for work. With the experience and expertise of retired teachers, they get extra attention in school itself,” he says.Vinod Rao, Secretary, Education Department, Gujarat, says the “major challenge” in the district is attendance. “Against the state performance of 57% students with attendance above 80%, Dahod has only 17%. All these initiatives are directed towards reviving attendance,” he says. Advertising Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield center_img Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Top News Advertising After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Post Comment(s) education, education poverty, indias poor education, dahod, dahod niti aayog, niti aayog education projects Retired teacher Natha Barjod at the primary school in Kalia Valunda village, Dahod. (Express Photo by Bhupendra Rana)UNTIL LAST year, Surya Bhabhor had the odds stacked against him. His parents were away, working as migrant workers, and he was with his grandmother in Gujarat’s Dahod, struggling to cope at school, finding it “difficult to read and write English”. Today, the 11-year-old breezes through the alphabet, and is happy to write his name in English and read out from a Class 5 textbook at the primary school in Vadela village.last_img read more

With Audio Focus Apple SideSteps Smart Speaker Competition

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first_imgMore iPad Muscle Heat on Sonos and Bose Focus on Music Apple also introduced to developers a new AR kit that it believes will make the company a leader in the augmented reality domain. “With AR kit, iOS 11 becomes the world’s largest augmented reality platform,” Cook said.What Apple introduced with AR on mobile is significant, maintained Bajarin.”They’ll dominate the AR space in mobile almost overnight,” he said. “The AR kit will create a level of innovation within their software developer community that is going to result in an amazing amount of new apps.”While there may be lots of new apps, whether or not there will be a lot innovation remains to be seen.”They’re not adding any hardware,” Krewell noted. “They’re just using the existing iPhone platform for AR, so it’s a limited version of AR — a better version of Pokemon Go.” In addition to announcing a new 10.5-inch iPad Pro, Apple revealed a number of features in iOS 11, which will be released in the fall, that give the tablets desktop operating features like drag and drop, an expanded dock for quick access to favorite programs, and support of a file system, including baked in support for popular third-party apps like Dropbox and One Drive. Apple is positioning HomePod more as an audio device than a smart home interface, said Jonathan Collins, a research director at ABI Research.”The focus looks to be more about competing with Sonos and supporting Apple’s Music service than its HomeKit efforts,” he told TechNewsWorld.”The price tag is notably higher than both Amazon and Google’s smart home offerings,” he pointed out, “and while it will no doubt appeal to Apple fans, there is little to suggest — at least from the initial details — that this will directly compete against those Echo and Home devices.” John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John. “Those are the features on the Mac that most of us have been wanting on the iPad for at least three years,” Creative Strategies’ Bajarin said.”Now the iPad is very similar in experience to the Macintosh,” he added. “That tells me that Apple believes that the iPad is the future form factor for mobile computing.”The iOS 11 features were needed if the iPad Pro wanted to live up to its “pro” name, maintained Kevin Krewell, a principal analyst at Tirias Research.”Without a file manager, you really couldn’t use it as a professional tool,” he told TechNewsWorld.”Now the iPad is much more functional for a professional who’s used to using a file manager in their work,” Krewell added. “This is a big step up for iOS.” AR Powerhouse? The processor, which can be found in older iPhones, allows the speaker to do real-time acoustic modeling, audio beam forming and multichannel echo cancellation.”You don’t have to know what any of that is,” said Schiller. “Just know that it sounds incredible.”There are six microphones in HomePod, so it can handle voice commands — even when it’s playing music — through Apple’s digital assistant Siri.”We really believe it’s going to take your home music experience to the next level,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said at the event.Although the smart speaker market is dominated by Amazon and Google, Apple appears to have set its sights on other players in the speaker market.”It’s going after Sonos and Bose sound systems in the home,” noted Tim Bajarin, president of Creative Strategies.”This is a powerful home audio speaker first that also supports Siri,” he told TechNewsWorld. Apple raised the curtain on HomePod, its upcoming smart speaker, during Monday’s keynote presentation at its Worldwide Developers Conference.The company also announced some desktop OS features for the iPad, and revealed its plans to become an augmented reality powerhouse.”Just like iPod reinvented music in our pockets, HomePod is going to reinvent music in our homes,” Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president for worldwide marketing, told an enthusiastic crowd at the San Jose Convention Center in California.HomePod, which will sell for US$350, is slightly less than 7 inches tall and is covered with a seamless 3D mesh fabric which, Schiller said, has “incredible acoustic properties.”Inside the speaker, there are seven tweeters, each with their own driver, that give sound precise directional control. HomePod also has a 4-inch woofer that uses dynamic software modeling to eliminate distortion as the volume is cranked up.The “smarts” of the speaker is from an Apple A8 processor.”It’s perhaps the biggest brain ever in a speaker,” Schiller said.The HomePod will be available in December. last_img read more

Tech Titans Pledge Continued Paris Accord Support

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first_imgSeeking a Brave New World Several high-tech industry companies that have opposed the United States’ withdrawal from the Paris Agreement have pledged to continue their environmentally conscious efforts.Google CEO Sundar Pichai promised to stay the course in his tweeted response:Disappointed with today’s decision. Google will keep working hard for a cleaner, more prosperous future for all.— Sundar Pichai (@sundarpichai) June 1, 2017″Withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement is bad for the environment, bad for the economy, and it puts our children’s future at risk,” wrote Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.”For our part, we’ve committed that every new data center we build will be powered by 100% renewable energy,” he added.Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff tweeted a statement of his company’s resolve to promote sustainability.Deeply disappointed by President’s decision to withdraw from ParisAgreement. We will double our efforts to fight climate change. pic.twitter.com/cmCLf9CoVY— Marc Benioff (@Benioff) June 1, 2017″Microsoft believes that climate change is an urgent issue that demands global action,” President Brad Smith posted on LinkedIn. “We’ve sent letters to and held meetings on this topic with senior officials in the State Department and the White House.”Apple CEO Tim Cook earlier this week urged President Trump to keep the U.S. in the agreement, he told employees in an email.Climate change is real, Cook said. Although disappointed with the pullout, he pledged to continue the company’s environmental push. The Trump administration will begin negotiations either to re-enter the Paris Agreement or to create a new one “on terms that are fair to the United States, its businesses, its people, its taxpayers,” the president said.However, France, Germany and Italy said in a joint statement that the Paris Agreement cannot be renegotiated.”Overpopulation and the environment are issues that must be addressed now,” said Jim McGregor, principal at Tirias Research.”If there’s something awry with the current agreements, we need to address those issues, either with modifications to the agreement or a new one — not just walk away,” he told TechNewsWorld.”The U.S. should be the leader, not the anchor holding us back by not signing the accords,” McGregor added. What High-Tech Companies Can Do Compliance with the terms of the agreement “could cost America as much as 2.7 million lost jobs by 2025,” including 440,000 fewer manufacturing jobs, President Trump said, citing a study by National Economic Research Associates.By 2040, compliance would cut production for various sectors, costing close to US$3 trillion in lost GDP and 6.5 million industrial jobs, Trump said, based on the study’s findings.Other studies, carried out not only by environmental organizations, but also by Citibank and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, have concluded that failure to curb climate change could cost the U.S. economy trillions of dollars, according to a New York Times news analysis.The Paris Agreement “could legitimately be branded as an economic accord, given the potential financial impact on the countries that agreed to it,” said Rob Enderle, principal analyst at the Enderle Group.However, “given the impact on climate is both disputed and indirect, it likely would have been more accurate to call this an accord that’s more directly focused on pollution, because the core measurements were tied to that,” he told TechNewsWorld.The Paris Agreement “was more of a political vehicle and one that was long on promise but very short on actual content,” Enderle said, adding that it lacks teeth to ensure compliance.It appears that Trump’s decision this week has triggered a process that will continue into 2020, likely ensuring that climate change will be a significant issue during the next presidential election.center_img Why Trump Withdrew From the Paris Agreement “Any number of companies are acting consciously to improve their environmental impact,” noted Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.For example, Dell EMC “has a variety of initiatives,” he told TechNewsWorld, including “using recycled materials in their packaging … and an initiative to recycle plastics floating in the ocean.”Still, many tech companies “talk the talk but don’t walk the walk when it comes to the environment,” Tirias’ McGregor pointed out.The fact that both supporters and opponents of environmental issues “know much of what they’re saying isn’t true, makes positive change almost impossible to accomplish,” Enderle said.The tech industry “is all about data and accuracy,” he remarked, and it “could use these tools to cut through the dishonesty and help those that truly want to make change.” Richard Adhikari has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2008. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, mobile technologies, CRM, databases, software development, mainframe and mid-range computing, and application development. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including Information Week and Computerworld. He is the author of two books on client/server technology. Email Richard.last_img read more

MWH Medical and Siemens Healthineers partner to launch first Asia Reference Center

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first_imgMWH Medical and Siemens Healthineers Partnership Opens Doors for Clinical Advancements in the Healthcare Sector.This partnership is a testament to the long working relationship between MWH Medical and Siemens Healthineers. Both parties will develop a Center of Excellence with the long-term objectives of ensuring better disease management and improving quality of patient care.With the rise of chronic diseases prevalent in Asia, the Centre will allow both parties to embark on partnerships to meet the enormous clinical interest in diagnostic advanced imaging.Through their shared efforts and cooperation, global experts from Siemens Healthineers will leverage MWH Medical’s facilities and state-of-the-art technology to drive training programmes and educate both local and regional medical practitioners.Together, both parties will continue to expand healthcare services in ensuring better disease management and improving overall patient outcome.Region’s First Siemens Healthineers Asia Reference Center in SingaporeSiemens Healthineers will establish its first-in-the-region, Asia Reference Center at the newly-launched MWH Medical Center. The Center will serve as a touch point to other regional medical facilities and to introduce Siemens’ latest medical innovations and technology in Asia.This strategic partnership will pave its way as the region’s main healthcare hub and cater to the challenges medical practitioners face in managing higher expectations around convenience, customization and overall experience.The partnership will seed a new set of considerations in seeking growth amid an industry in transformation.MWH Medical housed the region’s first 3T Magnetom Vida MRI machine that incorporates artificial intelligence with its BioMatrix Technology, the 3T MRI machine conducts faster examinations and produces results with higher resolution for better image quality and accuracy.The technology caters to the specific needs of each patient, while also delivering consistent, high-quality and personalized examination results that prevent unwarranted variations in imaging results, allowing MWH Medical to achieve improved medical precision and deliver better patient care.Partnership Elevates MWH Medical’s Patient-centric Care Through Digital Transformation Deputy Prime Minister and Coordinating Minister for National Security, Mr Teo Chee Hean, and Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Mr Charles Chong touring the Siemens Healthineers Asia Reference Center at the new MWH Medical Center The regional medical landscape is still fraught with underdeveloped infrastructure, fiscal constraints and shortages of medical professionals and equipment. In line with Singapore’s Smart Nation drive, we recognize that advancements in technology is needed to address growing medical concerns.With our strategic partnership with Siemens Healthineers, and in line with Singapore’s Smart Nation initiative, we want to digitize the healthcare experience for both patient and caregiver by improving the speed and efficacy in delivering care to patients.Doctors and patients alike will now be able to access their medical information remotely via the MWH app, and patients will now be able to participate in a tele-collaboration with experts from around the world together with their consulting doctor, reducing the need to even leave the country,”Dr. Michael Lim, Medical Director of MWH Medical. Source:https://www.healthcare.siemens.com/ Addressing Asia-Pacific’s Burgeoning Healthcare NeedsRelated StoriesSiemens debuts single-source CT scanner, SOMATOM Definition Edge at RSNA 2011Siemens Medical pledges $200,000 to SIR Foundation’s Discovery CampaignSiemens, Arkansas complete $10M agreement for Soarian health IT solution”The rise of the digital economy has had a profound effect across industries, eliciting varying degrees of adaptation. With one of the best healthcare systems in Asia and the world, setting up Siemens Healthineers’ first Asia Reference Center in Singapore together with MWH Medical was an amicable decision to make.””We are aligned in wanting to achieve the best outcome in healthcare delivery, and with the support of MWH Medical we look forward to providing Asia with greater access to the latest, world-class innovations in medical technology with precision medicine and transforming care delivery,” said Ms Siow Ai Li, Managing Director, Singapore, Siemens Healthineers. MWH Medical’s strategic partnership with Siemens Healthineers is a win-win for the state of healthcare in the region. Being able to meet the healthcare needs in the region  through this partnership with  Siemens Healthineers’ state-of-art technology, will help to enhance the status of Singapore as a regional health center for high quality health care.”Dr. Michael Lim, Medical Director of MWH Medical. Oct 23 2018Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)MWH Medical Pte Ltd (“MWH Medical” or “the Group”), a leading homegrown medical group, and Siemens Healthineers are pleased to announce the launch of the first Asia Reference Center through their partnership.Guest-of-Honor, Deputy Prime Minister and Coordinating Minister for National Security, Mr. Teo Chee Hean will be officiating the grand opening of the multi-specialist medical center at Royal Square, Novena.last_img read more

Exploring pathophysiological factors that link sleep problems and Alzheimers disease

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first_img Source:http://www.the-aps.org/mm/hp/Audiences/Public-Press/2019/11.html Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 22 2019A new article explores the pathophysiological factors that link sleep disturbances and Alzheimer’s disease. Better understanding of this connection may lead to potential diagnostics and therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases and dementia. The article is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology (JNP).Alzheimer’s research has largely focused on the presence of two proteins–amyloid beta and tau–in the brain. Amyloid beta is thought to be involved with learning and the ability of the brain to change and adapt, and tau helps regulate normal signaling between neuronal cells. People with Alzheimer’s disease have been found to have both hallmarks: a buildup of amyloid beta and tau tangles in the brain.Related StoriesHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionUnpleasant experiences could be countered with a good night’s REM sleepSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsPrevious studies in healthy animals and humans have reported higher levels of amyloid beta after a single night of sleep deprivation. This is consistent with normal fluctuation patterns of the protein that occur before sleeping and upon waking. These findings suggest that sleep helps the body eliminate excess amyloid beta before too much accumulates in the brain. Research has also shown that disruption of slow-wave sleep–a deep sleep phase–causes amyloid beta levels to rise as much as 30 percent. “This evidence demonstrates the significance of sleep in clearing metabolic waste and sleep disruption as a significant mediator in the development of [Alzheimer’s disease],” Shen Ning and Mehdi Jorfi, PhD, the authors of the article, wrote.The presence of tau–the protein that is found tangled in the brain of people with Alzheimer’s disease–in the fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord (cerebrospinal fluid) is a marker of injury to the nerve cells, the authors explained. Sleep deprivation for as little as one night has been found to increase tau levels by as much as 50 percent in cerebrospinal fluid.The research suggests that increased production of amyloid beta and tau and reduced elimination of these proteins is the primary contributing factor to Alzheimer’s disease. While quality sleep seems to be able to help the body clear excess proteins, “the question remains whether sleep disruption aggravates [Alzheimer’s disease] symptoms and augments disease progression, or if sleep disruption actually initiates the cascade of [Alzheimer’s disease] development,” the researchers wrote.Continuing study of the relationship between sleep and Alzheimer’s disease “holds great promise in bridging the molecular and cellular biology of sleep in context of the development of [Alzheimer’s disease]. It may even provide helpful therapeutic benefits in preventing not only [Alzheimer’s disease], but also in improving diagnosis and treatments for psychiatric and metabolic diseases,” the researchers wrote.last_img read more