The Second Machine Age: 5 Things Our Kids’ Kids Won’t Know About Transportation

No Comments

first_imgWhat it’s like to drive a carWhat it’s like to queue at the Department of Motor VehiclesWhat’s a taxiHow buses had a pre-defined routeHow Top Gear was a show, not the latest fresh garms. There’s a lot of fervor over what some of today’s best business minds are describing as The Second Machine Age. Decades in the making, the Second Machine Age represents another fundamental shift in the way we live, work and, yes, play.Like the first Machine Age, technological innovation and the quest for automation are driving the change, but this time around it will be the automation of information (or ‘knowledge works’) that will define the period, impacting lives on a whole new level of magnitude.In fact, while I was researching electric vehicles this past weekend, it struck me just how tectonic these changes will be and how close they really are, which brought home how every aspect of our lives will be irrevocably different.Cars will be driverless akin to computers on wheels. They’ll be knowledgeable about where you want to go, when you need to be there, what route to take, as well as all about your personal needs or habits, to optimize the experience.In this world, automobile manufacturers all but vanish; high-end cars have morphed into boutique markets for ‘controlled circuits’ and ‘scenic self-drive’ adventures taken exclusively by the nostalgic; and cyber highway robbery has become prolific.Bold statements? Perhaps, but not as far out as you may first think. Remember, at the center of all this is information—made available by the Internet of Things and made intelligent by predictive data analytics and machine learning, as well as a need for automation. So, back to electric cars… bear with me.As part of my research, I surveyed our employees, asking them about their plans for driving electric vehicles. And, as it turns out, rafts of folks have already gone electric, and many more are about to make purchases. The majority of these folks are in California on one of our two main campuses, and pretty much all of them say they have gone electric to get in the Diamond Lane so they can avoid traffic.So, you can assert that people are leaning toward efficient travel over the visceral stimulation of the ride—a trend that parallels the mass adoption of technologies such as the smart phone, virtualization and even cloud. Efficiency is the name of the game.As for me, I went looking at electric cars for my own use and got the data dump on their efficiencies: 100 mile round trips, tax credit, free charging at public locations, rapid charging in two hours, etc.  But I also learned of other features:Email alerts telling you when your car is refilled to a target amount.Mobile apps that give you the ability to warm your car, to exactly the right temp, before you get in.Information at work—and it’s just beginning.Add the Zipcar business model, a touch of Waze and the emergence of self-driving cars from Google, and my predictions for the year 2025 aren’t just possible; they are probable and imminent.As our world careens toward this new reality, scheduling, analytics, tracking, correlation, prediction and protection of assets (both data and people) become critical foundational building blocks. Teasing out operational gems from the ‘Small Data Sprawl’ is the real rock-face of big data. The instantaneous processing of such granular and intimate data drives this transformational wave, but data and orchestration in the wrong hands… well, I believe this needs no explanation to the potential consequences.We have to be able to trust in the Second Machine Age, and, yes, it will be the third platform that will turn this into reality, serving up information anywhere, anytime and with total protection.Folks, we ain’t seen nothing yet. Rulebooks will be re-written; every corner of the technology market will be fundamentally affected. Transportation as a service is around the corner, markets such as healthcare with wearable devices and retail with the Amazon malls will do the same.So, fasten your seatbelts; the ride is about to get interesting.–The concept of “The Second Machine Age” comes from Andrew McAfee and Eric Brynjolfsson at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as expressed in their recently published work The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies.last_img read more

32 Billion Devices Plugged In and Generating Data by 2020

No Comments

first_imgEmerging markets will soon overtake the rest of the world in producing the majority of new data on the planet. They’re developing information infrastructure without the legacy trappings inherent in today’s mature economies. As a result, countries like Brazil, China, India, Mexico and Russia are contributing to the growth of the digital universe at a furious pace. By 2020, the Digital Universe study forecasts that their data will go from 40% to 60% of the total information in circulation.The intersection of mobile, cloud, big data and social is phenomenal. Often referred to as the Third Platform or the Nexus of Forces, it is a huge driver of data growth in the digital universe. Organizations from many different sectors are taking advantage of this environment and reinventing their business models to become software-defined enterprises – businesses that are able to harness this sheer volume of data to make better, more informed decisions.Ultimately, the growth of the digital universe means there is an ever increasing pool of valuable data to analyze, which will give rise to new opportunities for organizations to better understand customers, improve overall customer experience and develop new revenue streams. To take full advantage, IT departments may need to hit the restart button on how they think about storing data when it comes to data lakes and hybrid cloud models.These are truly fascinating times. Technology enables individuals, organizations, and enterprises to scale communications and collaboration worldwide. The more that information is shared and mined, the more valuable it becomes for everyone.Dive deeper into the 2014 Digital Universe report here.  The depth and breadth of the data-powered world we live in today is already staggering and I am intensely curious about what the world will truly look like in the Digital Universe of 2020. The EMC Digital Universe study today launched its seventh edition. This highly anticipated study always makes a big splash because it focuses industry attention on the incredible growth rates of data. By 2020, the amount of data in our digital universe is expected to grow from 4.4 trillion GB in 2013 to 44 trillion GB.Some other points from the research that stood out for me include:The number of devices or “things” (tablets, smart phones, clothing, fridges, cars, anything with a sensor) able to connect to the Internet is already approaching 200 billion and 14 billion of those are actually connected to each other. This collection of inter-connected things, commonly referred to as the “Internet of Things” (IoT) is surprisingly only a small fraction of the total digital universe. Fast forward to the end of the decade and we are going to see this number grow to 10% as 32 billion devices are plugged in and generating data.last_img read more

Gartner Recognizes Dell EMC as a Leader in the First Ever Distributed File Systems and Object Storage Magic Quadrant

No Comments

first_imgSource: Gartner Magic Quadrant for Distributed File System and Object Storage, October 2016. http://www.gartner.com/reprints/v16?id=1-3HYASF6&ct=160919&st=sbIt is no secret that the shift to digital transformation is taking businesses to new levels…and IT is the enabler. Here at Dell EMC, we have dedicated ourselves to helping our customers reach their goals with the technology and services to transform their businesses not only for today, but also well into the future.Isilon is a well-established, market-leading product, with more than 10 years of market growth. With over 7,000 customers, Isilon continues to rapidly evolve and innovate to meet customers’ growing demands for storing and analyzing file-based workloads. Isilon provides multi-protocol support, combined with enterprise-grade data management, protection and security that helps customers eliminate silos and consolidate their NAS infrastructure.ECS is designed specifically for next-generation apps that demand massive unstructured data storage capacity, global access and cloud scale economics. In addition to object protocols, ECS supports file and Hadoop (HDFS) which enable customers to consolidate data from multiple sources into one, single, global cloud. With ECS as one object storage platform for all data, customers can free up primary storage, modernize existing applications, and accelerate cloud native application development using a consumption model of their choice, as an appliance, software running on Dell servers or as a service.Dell EMC holds leadership position in a total of 20 Gartner Magic Quadrants and we can now add this new report to our list of industry recognition. This standout position in Gartner’s latest report lets the world know what our customers are experiencing every day—that Dell EMC delivers world-class products to meet business needs today, tomorrow and beyond. This recognition supports our belief that no other vendor is better equipped to enable digital transformation than Dell EMC.Read the complete report here: http://www.gartner.com/reprints/v16?id=1-3HYASF6&ct=160919&st=sbThis graphic was published by Gartner, Inc. as part of a larger research document and should be evaluated in the context of the entire document. The Gartner document is available upon request from Dell EMC.Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.[1] Worldwide Scale-Out NAS Vendor Revenue (US$M), IDC Enterprise Storage Systems Tracker, June 2016 Dell EMC has earned a leader position in the first ever Gartner Magic Quadrant for Distributed File Systems and Object Storage. We concur with the Gartner assessment that growing data absolutely necessitates storage solutions that address the needs of many use cases with low acquisition and operational costs. We believe Dell EMC is positioned in the upper right corner of the Leaders Quadrant today because of our ability to meet this need.This report evaluates Distributed File and Object Storage vendors that help customers deal with the rapid growth in unstructured data. Isilon, the industry leader in scale-out NAS storage,[1] and Dell EMC Elastic Cloud Storage (ECS), were both recognized as leaders in this Gartner report.  We believe this recognition demonstrates our industry-leading capabilities to help prepare our customers for their digital future. Isilon and ECS help customers drive their IT and business transformation by providing storage efficiency, performance, global access and reliability at scale and economics that businesses demand. Underpinning the Dell EMC Data Lake, Isilon is the foundation for building out a consolidated single pool of storage for file-based data, while ECS combines public cloud storage features and economics with private cloud benefits.last_img read more

Dell Team Members Reflect on Pride Beyond Borders

No Comments

first_imgAs a member of the LGBTQ community and a proud 19-year tenure at Dell, I am excited to take a few moments to reflect on what this year’s Dell Pride month theme, “Pride Beyond Borders,” means.Personally, I have had the honor of being on the leadership team of Dell Pride Employee Resource Group (ERGs) for the last six years and being a Global Lead for the ERG for last four years. Over that time, I have seen the growth of the Pride ERG chapters globally across Europe, Latin America, and most recently into our Asia Pacific region with the addition of Sydney, Australia. The energy and dedication from locations like Nashville, Tennessee; Panama City, Panama; Montpelier, France and Sydney, Australia takes the Dell Pride experience to a higher level and greater visibility for the work Dell is doing to support the LGBTQ community around the world.To me, “Pride Beyond Borders” means sharing the inclusive spirit I have experienced at Dell across the world and seeing how our global team members share their pride both internally at Dell and externally in their communities. Dell is a place where differences are understood and celebrated and contribute to it being a great place to work.With this in mind, as the global Pride leader, I thought it was important to ask Dell Pride members across the globe what “Pride Beyond Borders” means to them. Here is what a few of them had to say:Kusko – Round Rock, Texas, USA:Processed with MOLDIVHaving Pride Beyond Borders means having the ability to be an Adventuring Humanitarian, dressed as a whimsical tiger going around the world spreading love and acceptance and “tiger nabbing” landmarks by snapping an epic selfie. Happy Tiger Tales is about joyfully “tiger nabbing famous places around the world, with a single goal of connecting humanity through happiness.  People see a tiger, and want to interact, say hi, give you a hug, or high five, but they don’t see a race, religion, sex, they just see a happy tiger. Beyond tiger nabbing and adventure racing, the tiger has created virtual reality experiences for a local children’s hospital, volunteered in a village in Nepal and speaks about “Impact Beyond Purpose.” To date, for Happy Tiger Tales, traveled over 200,000 miles, tiger nabbed hundreds of places and given a gazillion hugs to thousands of strangers. Dell encourages me to be the best version of myself, every day! Everyone, anywhere can join the journey, and it’s easy to do on both Instagram and Facebook, just follow “HAPPY TIGER TALES.” Our intention is simply to connect humanity through happiness and inspire curiosity and kindness everywhere.Hugues Chabannes, Montpellier, France:At Dell, I can be who I am and talk about my personal life without fear. Our organization pays a lot of attention to LGBTQ people so that they feel recognized for who they are and so that they are not discriminated against.The Pride ERG is very well structured locally but also at a global level and its representatives play a key role as ambassadors of the LGBTQ community internally and externally. Personally, I think it’s a real chance to have such a community available at Dell as a gay person.Isabel KennerTechnical Training Advisor | Pride APJC Regional Program Manager:Ever since I told my manager and my supervisor via email that I was transgender, that I would like to be called Isabel ongoing and that I’d like to have she/her pronouns used when referring to me, I’ve had no concern that being myself at work was an issue. Both of my managers acknowledged my email and have not ONCE used my old name or old pronouns since. I know for certain how hard this is to do and I appreciate it IMMENSELY.Since my transition I have traveled to China, Japan and Bangalore and had not only no issues in any Dell office, but I have made so many friends through Pride in those countries and closer to home. We even had a team from the USA in our offices on a project during IDAHOBIT and they were so impressed with the rainbow level in the Sydney office that we went out on their last free night to have a look at Oxford Street (Sydney’s QUILTBAG+ heartland & the main Mardi Gras parade route). So to my managers and to the people I have become friends with or just better friends with because of Pride. I want to say a HUGE thank you for being you and thank you for letting me be me.As you all take a minute to recognize and celebrate Pride month, we’d love to hear from all of you—what does Pride Beyond Borders mean to you? #BeYourself #PrideatDelllast_img read more

Capitol Police chief apologizes for failures in Jan. 6 siege

No Comments

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — The interim chief of the Capitol Police has apologized for failing to prepare for what became a violent insurrection despite having warnings that white supremacists and far-right groups would target Congress. Yogananda Pittman, in prepared testimony before Congress on Tuesday, said that the Capitol Police “failed to meet its own high standards as well as yours.” She listed several missteps: not having enough manpower or supplies on hand, not following through with a lockdown order she issued during the siege and not having a sufficient communications plan for a crisis. Five people died in the Jan. 6 riot.last_img

Steve Jobs, Apple founder, dies at 56

No Comments

first_imgCUPERTINO, Calif. — Steve Jobs, the Apple founder and former CEO who invented and masterfully marketed ever-sleeker gadgets that transformed everyday technology, from the personal computer to the iPod and iPhone, died Wednesday. He was 56. Apple announced his death without giving a specific cause. He died peacefully, according to a statement from family members who said they were present. “Steve’s brilliance, passion and energy were the source of countless innovations that enrich and improve all of our lives,” Apple’s board said in a statement. “The world is immeasurably better because of Steve.” Jobs had battled cancer in 2004 and underwent a liver transplant in 2009 after taking a leave of absence for unspecified health problems. He took another leave of absence in January — his third since his health problems began — and officially resigned in August. He took another leave of absence in January — his third since his health problems began — before resigning as CEO six weeks ago. Jobs became Apple’s chairman and handed the CEO job over to his hand-picked successor, Tim Cook. Outside Apple’s Cupertino headquarters, three flags — an American flag, a California state flag and an Apple flag — were flying at half-staff late Wednesday. “Those of us who have been fortunate enough to know and work with Steve have lost a dear friend and an inspiring mentor.” Cook wrote in an email to Apple’s employees. “Steve leaves behind a company that only he could have built, and his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple.” The news Apple fans and shareholders had been dreading came the day after Apple unveiled its latest version of the iPhone, just one in a procession of devices that shaped technology and society while Jobs was running the company. Jobs started Apple with a high school friend in a Silicon Valley garage in 1976, was forced out a decade later and returned in 1997 to rescue the company. During his second stint, it grew into the most valuable technology company in the world with a market value of $351 billion. Almost all that wealth has been created since Jobs’ return. Cultivating Apple’s countercultural sensibility and a minimalist design ethic, Jobs rolled out one sensational product after another, even in the face of the late-2000s recession and his own failing health. He helped change computers from a geeky hobbyist’s obsession to a necessity of modern life at work and home, and in the process he upended not just personal technology but the cellphone and music industries. For transformation of American industry, he has few rivals He has long been linked to his personal computer-age contemporary, Bill Gates, and has drawn comparisons to other creative geniuses such as Walt Disney. Jobs died as Walt Disney Co.’s largest shareholder, a by-product of his decision to sell computer animation studio Pixar in 2006.last_img read more

Students dedicate fall break to service in Appalachia

No Comments

first_imgSome Notre Dame students traveled to the mountains for fall break, but they dedicated their week to service rather than vacation time. These students were among over 250 participants in the semi-annual Appalachia seminar sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns (CSC). Cynthia Toms-Smedley, director of educational immersions at the CSC, said the seminar sends students to several sites across the Appalachia region to serve local communities. The program draws more students than any other CSC program, she said. “I think there’s a mix between the service aspect and getting to know community members in Appalachia, as well as an opportunity to have fun while doing service,” she said. “It’s an opportunity to learn about some of the challenges in Appalachia and to exercise our opportunity to serve people.” The CSC reviewed a record number of 272 applications for the fall trip, Smedley said. The seminar also sends students to the region over spring break. After students travel to Appalachia once, Smedley said many continue to volunteer with the program. “There are a lot of repeat students who are there for the third and fourth time,” she said. “They like to reconnect with the community they have served in the past.” Sophomore Bobby Alvarez spent his week at the Community Development Outreach Ministries (CDOM) in St. Albans, W. Va., and said he plans to return there in the future. “I want to go again, for the friendships I made, but also because the site I was working at was really an amazing site,” Alvarez said. “The people I worked with there were great.” At CDOM, Alvarez and 18 other Notre Dame students spent the mornings painting the community center. After lunch, the volunteers helped local children with their homework and played with them outside until dark. “A lot of the kids came from single parents or families involved with drugs and a lot have families that don’t really care about them,” Alvarez said. “The time at the community center and their time with us is a very special time for both them and us.” Alvarez said students who volunteer at CDOM frequently return because of the unique bonds they form with the children. Sophomore Colleen Duffy spent the week at the Hurley Community Development Center in Hurley, Va. Duffy said she applied to Appalachia to experience the cultural differences between that region and other parts of the country. “I wanted to do something more meaningful with my fall break than to go home and sit by myself,” she said. “I wanted to do something different.” During her first few days, Duffy said she built a porch and ramp on a trailer for a woman who was disabled in a car accident. “The woman was in rehab and was going to return soon, but she couldn’t get into her home,” she said. Duffy also worked at a local food bank with some of the 21 other volunteers who also traveled to Hurley. She said enjoyed meeting not only other Notre Dame students but also the community members. “Everyone from the community would just stop by the center and stop in to tell stories, and we’d always be there,” Duffy said. “By the end of the week, I felt like they were my family, and I wish I could go back.” Smedley said the seminar sends students to approximately 20 Appalachia sites, and each offers a different experience. “You can choose a site where you can get involved in education or in trail cleanup or work with people looking at sustainable agriculture,” Smedley said. Many of the sites have been part of the Appalachia program for decades, and Smedley said each must meet certain criteria to ensure that the volunteers can produce the maximum benefits. “For the centers, it’s an opportunity for students to be useful to the community and not to be a drain on their resources and capacity, but to serve in a way that is helpful,” she said. “And for our students, our hope is that they have an opportunity to get to know the community on a personal level.”last_img read more

Class travels to civil rights memorials over break

No Comments

first_imgFall Break is usually a time for students to return to normalcy: mom’s specialty dishes, catching up with neighborhood friends and copious amounts of sleeping. For English professor Stuart Greene’s freshman university seminar class, the week was filled with visitations to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the 16th Street Baptist Church and other historical sites in Alabama to engage in experiential learning for their course: “Memory, Memorials and Memorialization of the American Civil Rights Movement.” “I have never done this before, even though I have been teaching classes on the civil rights movement for nearly 10 years,” Greene said. “A colleague at Indiana University-South Bend inspired me who taught a class on the civil rights movement and spent two weeks traveling to Montgomery, Selma, Birmingham, Memphis, Nashville and other sites. He called the experience ‘Freedom Summer.’” Greene conducted a tremendous amount of research by looking at various guides and discussing with historians about which places to visit and which people the class should meet. “Everyone was incredibly generous with their time and willingness to spend time with my students and I,” Greene said. The class received funding from the College of Arts and Letters’ “Teaching Beyond the Classroom” program and from the First Year of Studies. Greene and the students covered approximately 20 percent of the cost for travel, lodging, food and admission fees to museums, institutes and churches. “It would have been great going home, but this is a once-in-a-lifetime experience going with your peers and a professor who is an expert on the subject,” said Bryce Parker, a student in the class. “I’m in college once and can go home another time “If we missed out on this experience, we would have asked why did I give this up just to go home? I don’t think any of us regret it.” Aliska Berry signed up for the course because of the mandatory Alabama trip. “It gave me a firsthand account to experience the Civil Rights Movement,” Berry said. “The trip made me learn about my ancestors, what they went through and why I’m here today. It was a humbling experience.” Austin Bosemer, whose favorite experience of the trip was walking through the streets of Selma, said the course has taken a social activism spin on its historical foundations. “I have gotten involved with Take 10, a volunteer program to mentor students in South Bend area schools,” Bosemer said. “Through this, I’m affecting social change in our community.” The students said their most memorable experience was meeting JoAnne Bland, a tour guide who guided the group through two churches in Selma. As a nine-year-old, Bland was a peaceful protestor scheduled to march from Selma to the state capital in Montgomery. However, armed officers carrying tear gas attacked the demonstrators at the Edmund Pettus Bridge, forbidding them from reaching Montgomery. The infamous day is commonly known as “Bloody Sunday.” “The march turned the national spotlight on Selma and the plight of minorities,” David Katter, another student in the class, said. “She has a lot of built-up rage over that event, which turned into a really moving trip as we walked through Selma with her. “She asked us, ‘I got you this far, what are you going to do?’ It was a really cool call to action.” The semester-long project of the class is to write a 15-page essay concerning the trip, how it affected the students, the importance of a chosen memorial and the importance of it. Some students, like Jas Smith, have created individual projects to complement their experiences. “I decided to make a website to educate children in the Selma area about the Pettus Bridge because a lot of them don’t know about it,” Smith said. “My project is to reform the teaching of history and show why these aspects of civil rights are important.” Beyond engaging in an experience hard to fully understand from reading history books, Greene said the students enjoyed themselves and came together a class. “The effect on us was great and it was a bonding experience for us all,” he said.last_img read more

Auditions open for Shakespeare play

No Comments

first_imgStudents have the chance to find their own midsummer night’s dreams again this year with the Young Company, a group that allows talented undergraduate and graduate students to perform as a part of the 15th annual Shakespeare Festival at Notre Dame.Grant Mudge, Ryan producing artistic director of the Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival, said the Festival organizers and the two main directors are currently gearing up for the Young Company auditions. Students accepted to the group will perform as part of the Festival in both their designated production and alongside professionals in the Professional Company production. He said Notre Dame students will be joined by students from other universities, primarily in the Midwest, who will come to campus for the opportunity to audition.The students selected will take part in three weeks of training in the summer and then will begin touring the Michiana area, within a 1.5-hour travel time radius of Notre Dame, between July 20 and August 25, Mudge said. They will also work with professional actors to stage “Henry IV,” which will run from Aug.19 to Aug. 31.Auditions for the Young Company will take place on campus this Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Regis Philbin Studio Theatre of the Debartolo Performing Arts Center, and the necessary application forms can be found at shakespeare.nd.edu, Mudge said. Students currently studying abroad will have the opportunity to submit video auditions, he said.Mudge, who is running the Festival for the second time, said the Festival will offer four different elements: ShakeScenes, the Young Company production of “The Merry Wives of Windsor,” the Professional Company production of “Henry IV” and the Actors From the London Stage production of “Much Ado About Nothing.”“The anniversary reveals how much of a tradition of Shakespeare we have here,” Mudge said. “It’s really within the fabric of our history as a university.“The history of Shakespeare on campus is astonishing to me and most folks don’t realize how extensive it is.”Mudge said the Young Company will be directed by West Hyler. Hyler has worked on Broadway as an assistant director of “Jersey Boys” and directed productions of the same show internationally. He has also been a director with the Big Apple Circus on “Legendarium,” with several large Las Vegas Casinos on “Panda” and with various regional theatres nationwide.“He’s got this very wide range of experience,” Mudge said.The other director, Michael Goldberg, has a background in Chicago theatre and will be directing the Professional Company production of “Henry IV,” in which Shakespeare’s “Henry IV, Part 1” and “Henry IV, Part 2” are “conflated” into one play.Mudge said “Henry IV” was chosen because it was the first full Shakespeare play performed on campus 150 years ago.“I think it’s a great lens, doing ‘Henry IV’ on the 150th anniversary of its first performance at Notre Dame, through which we can view not only our history on campus but also our national experience,” he said. “It was 1864, at the height of the Civil War, and they chose to stage a play that says: ‘Those opposed eyes,/ Which, like the meteors of a troubled heaven,/ All of one nature, of one substance bred,/ Did lately meet in the intestine shock/ And furious close of civil butchery/ Shall now, in mutual well-beseeming ranks,/ March all one way and be no more opposed/ Against acquaintance, kindred and allies.’”The crux of the play is the dilemma of young Henry IV over whether to follow the model of Sir John Falstaff and descend into debauchery or that of his father and become a serious monarch, Mudge said.“Come see Henry IV because it has everything. It is both hilarious and very moving, which I think is at the heart of what Shakespeare likes to do,” he said.Mudge said the famous literary critic Harold Bloom deemed Falstaff to be one of Shakespeare’s greatest characters, on par with Hamlet. Falstaff also appears in a different context in “The Merry Wives of Windsor,” which was chosen for the Young Company for this reason.“It’s not often you get to see the wife-chasing Falstaff and the “Henry IV” Falstaff in the same season,” Mudge said. “I’m pleased we’re going to have that.”Tags: Shakespearelast_img read more

McCormick reflects on plans for Campus Ministry

No Comments

first_imgIn the past several years, Fr. Pete McCormick has become one of the most recognizable figures on campus.He was formerly the rector of Keough Hall, a DJ at Legends and director of Campus Ministry’s freshman retreat program. Currently, he’s finishing an MBA in the Mendoza College of Business and serving as chaplain to the men’s basketball team. All of his past roles have a common theme, he said — connecting him with students and giving him a better sense of student needs, which he plans to use in his role as the new director of Campus Ministry.“I’ve had the benefit of working with students in all that I’ve done, so from my perspective, the focus of the director of Campus Ministry is really to be thinking about students first,” he said. “I really hope to be able to use that mindset as a way to give back. This office and the opportunities that I have are wasted if they’re not used every day to think about how we can care for students better.”McCormick said he sees Campus Ministry’s mission as a three-part process: first, an invitation, then a “content-rich place of formation” and finally, a mechanism for leading people to prayer.“I think that Campus Ministry should be a place that constantly invites people into what we are doing,” he said. “It shouldn’t be seen as exclusive or as a club, but a place that is welcoming to all.“And once people are here and feel comfortable, we can teach them about the things that matter most. I think all too often on campus and in our lives, we spend a lot of time talking about things that are important but are not necessarily what’s going on in the depth of our minds and hearts. We want to be a place where folks can ask hard questions about their lives and what they hope to be about.”The liturgical and folk choirs are one area where Campus Ministry has historically done well, he said, as are leadership development programs such as Anchor and Compass. This semester, Campus Ministry is beginning a spirituality study to evaluate current programming and brainstorm improvements for the future.“We need to know, what are we doing that’s good, what are we doing that’s not so good and what are we doing that could possibly be discontinued?” McCormick said. “Starting now, we’re going to do a benchmarking episode where we look at other universities to see what they’re doing and also begin to look in high schools to see what our future students look like now. We’re going to get some good information from those that are here, but I’m also interested in hearing about what the class of 2022 looks like so we can start to come up with new and creative ways to begin to build new opportunities.”He cited the relatively new pilgrimage program as an example of pre-planning done well — in the past few years, it’s become “one of the most exciting things that we’re doing,” sending students to Hawaii, the Holy Land, France, Mexico and beyond.“To think that four years ago, five years ago, we weren’t doing pilgrimages at all makes me think about what the next step will be now,” he said. “It’s always driving in the same direction though, as an invitation, a deepening of formation and a leading to prayer.”Ideally, Campus Ministry’s boundaries would blur fluidly with those of the Center for Social Concerns and other faith-based action opportunities on campus, he said.“You have to have both a spiritual and social component,” McCormick said. “If we’re not giving people the opportunity to actually practice their faith, then in my mind we’re not doing our jobs.“I just think that you can’t keep faith contained all in one self, so certainly we’re going to provide opportunities for retreats and reflection and the enhancement of knowledge, but yet my sincere hope is that students will take what they’re doing out into campus or to their halls, giving it back in different ways.”McCormick said the director of Campus Ministry position has been a dream of his for a while, inspired partially by his mentor and predecessor in the office, Fr. Jim King. McCormick will finish his MBA in May and continue as basketball chaplain, but he said he’s leaving many possibilities open about the future of Campus Ministry.“I’ve learned that things that are worth doing oftentimes require a little bit of risk,” he said. “Sometimes we’re tempted to play it safe, to stay in our comfort zones. My approach to Campus Ministry is going to be to have a little bit of risk that we enter into with our programming, a little bit of risk when it comes to our invitation to formation.“I just think that leaving that space open to a bit of risk is where God finds his way in. And it’s too tempting to be controlling to our own environments, but it makes it really difficult for the Holy Spirit to work if we have no interest in trying something new.”Despite a new office and a staff of 30 working under him, McCormick said he sees this role as a chance to continue what he’s always done — working with students and getting out in the community.“I’ve got great people who are working here, so I’m excited to go out and see the retreats. I’m excited to go and listen to a concert. I’m excited to go hear confessions for people on a pilgrimage or whatever the case may be,” he said. “It’s really going to come down to getting invested in the people that are here, and that’s going to lead to all different sorts of possibilities.”Tags: Campus Ministry, Faith, Fr. Pete, servicelast_img read more