Category: mynutjob

UK floats pay-ratio disclosure in corporate governance consultation

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first_imgThe UK government has launched a consultation on corporate governance in the country that includes the idea of intra-company pay ratios as one means of addressing concerns raised by institutional investors about excessive pay. The department for business, energy and industrial strategy (BEIS) unveiled the green paper today.It is designed to “stimulate a debate on a range of options for strengthening the UK’s corporate governance framework, including options for increasing shareholder influence over executive pay and strengthening the employee, customer and supplier voice at boardroom level”.One of the topics it is seeking feedback on is corporate governance in privately held businesses. The government said it did not have “preferred options at this stage”.The consultation comes two days before the PLSA is due to publish its AGM report.Luke Hildyard, stewardship and corporate governance policy lead at the association, said it would highlight “how our pension fund members feel about current levels of executive pay” and set out how satisfied pension funds were with respect to asset managers fulfilling their stewardship responsibilities.“Our members are concerned by the rising levels of executive pay and believe the justification for this increase is weak,” said Hildyard.“We are pleased the government’s green paper is expected to include proposals we have previously advocated, including the publication of intra-company pay ratios.”The UK’s Financial Reporting Council (FRC), responsible for the country’s corporate governance and stewardship codes, welcomed the government’s “wide-ranging” consultation.The government green paper comes after the BEIS select committee earlier this year carried out a corporate governance inquiry, with the FRC noting that it made recommendations as part of this, such as on developing the role of the remuneration committee.The FRC said it stood “ready to develop and implement these proposals to help support a strong economy and meet the needs of wider society”.Leon Kamhi, head of responsibility at Hermes Investment Management, said the measures proposed by the government “look set to strengthen investors’ hand on pay, and it is now incumbent on both companies and us as investors to respond to the challenge of excessive executive remuneration”.Publication of a CEO-to-median-employee pay ratio, he said, was “not a panacea” but would provide welcome increased transparency, “as it puts pressure on boards to explain the rationale behind the level of executive remuneration and disparities in pay across the organisation”.He noted that the government did not propose elected employees on boards, a measure Hermes IM would have liked to see.Employee representation on boards is a measure prime minister Theresa May called for in corporate governance comments in her early days in office, although she has since backed away from this.Frances O’Grady, general secretary at trade union TUC, said the government’s proposals were “disappointing” and would “not do enough to shake-up corporate Britain”.“This is not what Theresa May promised,” she said.“We need the voice of elected workers in the boardroom, rather than on advisory panels.”last_img read more

Aero Race Wheels marks 20th season as IMCA partner

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first_imgESTHERVILLE, Iowa – Aero Race Wheels reaches a pair of IMCA sponsorship milestones this season.The Estherville, Iowa, manufacturer notes its 20th season as a marketing partner with the sanctioning body as well as its 10th consecutive season as title sponsor of IMCA’s popular feature win decal program.“Everyone at Aero Race Wheels takes great pride in our partnership with IMCA and all the positive aspects the sanctioning body provides to our industry,” said Aero Marketing Manager Kelli Peton. “We look forward to continuing our support of IMCA and its racers.”Forty dollar product certificates, good toward the purchase of two wheels, go to designated place finishers at 80 specials for Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modifieds, IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars, IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks, Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods and Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center Southern SportMods.Those awards will be mailed from the IMCA home office the week after official results from those races are received.Allstar Performance state champions in the same divisions get $25 product certificates, to be presented during the national IMCA banquet in November or mailed beginning in December.Decals are to be given to drivers following sanctioned weekly or special events victories.Information about Aero-made wheels is available by calling 888 895-2376, on Facebook and at the www.aeroracewheel.com web­site.“Observing both of these partnership milestones is really tremendous and we are honored to have had the support of Aero for two decades,” IMCA Marketing Director Kevin Yoder noted.”It is great to have partners that you also consider friends and Aero brings that genuine attitude that enhances and strengthens the business relationship.”last_img read more

Noteboom makes history at Park Jefferson

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first_imgJay Noteboom’s Aug. 18 IMCA Modified victory at Park Jefferson Speedway was his career 74th at the South Dakota speedplant. (Photo by Jeff Bylsma)JEFFERSON, S.D. (Aug. 18) – IMCA Modified driver Jay Noteboom stole the show Saturday at Park Jefferson Speedway.Noteboom notched career win number 74 at Park Jefferson to pass Late Model Hall of Fame driver Joe Kosiski as the speedway’s all-time feature winner.With tears in his eyes, Noteboom accepted the checkers and trophy from flagman Nate Peterson.It was not an easy battle in the Artworks Graphics IMCA Modified special, as Chris Abelson was first to move to the lead on the multi-lane oval. Toward the late stages, Abelson drifted high off the track and gave up the lead.Noteboom saw his chance and pounced, then held off the challenges of Bob Moore to take the historic win. Abelson was third.Ryan Voss took the IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Car win and Colin Smith the unofficial 2018 track championship.last_img read more

Cricket News Justin Langer backs Australian skipper Aaron Finch to come good soon

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first_imgJustin Langer backed Aaron Finch to be back in form soon again. Steve Smith and David Warner are expected to be in the contention soon. India will be up against Australia from tomorrow for five-match ODI series.  Langer also praised Finch’s composure as a captain, especially in the backdrop of the opener going through a barren run.”Another important part of leadership is that he’s really consistent. We haven’t seen any real change in his personality or his attitude around the group, so that’s a real credit to him. That’s why he is the captain of the team.”My experience with every captain, the most important thing is they’re playing really good cricket. He’s got to keep his attention on that. He’s got lots of support around him. Like I say, he’s such a good person, he’s got to be Aaron Finch, be himself. He’s doing that. He’s one of the nicest people you’ll ever meet. We’ll just keep encouraging him to be himself. His runs will come, keep encouraging him to be himself and I’m sure he’ll come good soon,” he noted.Langer also noted that the banned of David Warner and Steven Smith are in line to return to the national fold before the World Cup. He added that he has been in constant touch with both the players. At present, both the players are recuperating from their respective elbow injuries, with Smith even hitting the nets.”I’ve been in touch with them for the last nine months and as it gets closer to them coming back in the squad, I’m not sure it increases how much we speak to each other, it’s been consistent. That will remain the same. I think Dave’s probably a little more advanced (in his rehabilitation) but my understanding is they’ll be ready to go in the not-too-distant future.” highlights For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. New Delhi: The Australia head coach, Justin Langer backed Aaron Finch to wade through the lean patch and regain form ahead of the ODI series against India, which is scheduled to start on March 2 at the Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium, Hyderabad. Finch didn’t have the greatest of outings in the shortest format, having been able to score a total of just eight runs in two games.Finch was sent back to the pavilion by Jasprit Bumrah on the first delivery in the first encounter. Aussie skipper didn’t get going in the second game as well, and to make matters worse, the opener hasn’t notched up a single fifty across both the shorter versions of the game over 19 innings.”He’s such a good player, such a good person, captain of the team, we know he’ll come good,” Langer said in Bengaluru on Thursday. “We just got to keep giving him plenty of care and support. We know he’ll come good. There’s no more destructive player in the world – we talk about ‘Maxi’, Marcus Stoinis, a number of our players who can be so destructive – but when he’s going, he is as destructive as a player as there is in white-ball cricket. We know he’ll come good and we’ll be patient with him,” he added.last_img read more

UW looks to pick up wins over weekend

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first_imgAfter a two-game trip to California over Labor Day Weekend, the Wisconsin men’s soccer team will be adding to their frequent flier miles this weekend as they travel to Florida for another pair of matches. Their first game will be against Florida International Friday, followed by Florida Atlantic Sunday.Coming off a long stretch of games and travel, the Badgers’ main focus in practice this week has been recovery. The extra rest has been especially important given the fact they have a freshmen-laden roster, which has never experienced the rigor of a collegiate schedule before.“It’s been tough since we’re on this little two-week span here of just games and traveling,” goalie Ryan Vint said. “But we’re coming off of this last week and we’re feeling pretty good about how our team is coming together, how freshmen are getting along with the upperclassmen and fitting into our system.”Wisconsin’s roster is comprised of 13 freshmen, seven of which have already seen action this season. The most notable freshman has been forward Chris Prince, who was named to the all-tournament team in California.“I think Chris Prince did a good job,” defender Aaron Nichols said. “He stayed pretty confident throughout both games. He was constantly staying involved. He has good fitness and you know he fits right in. He’s there physically and you could tell that he’s a very mature freshman.”It would be hard for any team to go from opposite ends of the country with only four days rest and perform at a high level. However, if any team can do it, it’s the Badgers. This is a team that is accustomed to change. They have gone through three coaches in as many years. This season, the team is going through change in the form of players. Along with the freshmen, the Badgers have a slew of new players looking to contribute this year, including junior transfer Arnel Zahirovic and redshirt freshman Derek Pitts. Both saw their first playing time as Badgers in last weekend’s matches. Because of the recent contributions of the aforementioned players, there has been a lot of shuffling around of the Badgers’ line-up lately. This has made for a more competitive practice environment.“We’re still trying to find the right pieces to the puzzle,” Vint said. “We’re getting close, but it’s a process. Different people step up at different times and that’s what a whole season is about. It’s not always that you have your set job. People come out and practice and perform better and that’s how it keeps changing. It keeps you on your toes.”If there is one thing that is constant for this Badger team, it is the leadership from their senior captains: Defender Aaron Nichols, goalie Vint and midfielder Jon Rzepka. Heading into this weekend’s games against Florida International and Florida Atlantic, it will be vital for them to continue to coach the younger guys on the team and push them in practice. With the first couple of games under their belt, Nichols is confident the team will only be getting better from this point forward.“I think it’s going to be a little bit easier,” Nichols said. “You get that first one out of the way. There’s a lot of nerves. You definitely could tell, especially in the game against UC-Irvine, because there’s a lot of young players and they’re not used to playing in bigger games. I think if anything we got better from it and I think we’ll be good going forward.”Vint added to this notion, saying, “we’re just going to keep building. We’re going to keep building off of our success on Friday against Santa Clara and keep going with it. Hopefully it’ll translate into something bigger and better this weekend.”last_img read more

Fiammetta: Badgers getting love, but there’s more to be done

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first_imgJust in time for Valentine’s Day, the Wisconsin Badgers finally got some love this week.Of course, it was all a result of their own doing, as the Badgers upended the formerly No. 1, undefeated Ohio State Buckeyes Saturday at the Kohl Center. Jordan Taylor entered beast mode when UW needed it most, scoring 21 points after OSU built its largest lead, 47-32, with 13:21 remaining in the game. Bo Ryan showed he really is one of the nation’s top coaches, and Madison showed it really is one of the nation’s top sports towns – and not just for football.What a weekend, right?Yes, but let’s not forget the Badgers can’t play every game in the friendly confines of the Kohl Center. Only three days prior to facing Ohio State, Wisconsin traveled to Iowa City and shot just 6-for-33 (18.2 percent) from the field in the first half. The Badgers rebounded to make more than half of their shots in the second half and escaped with a 62-59 overtime win.That was against Iowa, the last-place team in the Big Ten. The Hawkeyes are undoubtedly improving, but still – numbers are numbers.Wednesday night, in West Lafayette, Ind., against Purdue, the opposition will be better, the crowd will be louder and the atmosphere will be more hostile.March 6, when the Badgers travel to Columbus for Bucky-Brutus II and a rematch with the Buckeyes, the same will hold true – but amplified. After having the entire Grateful Red, a bunch of drunken old dudes and seemingly half the state of Wisconsin suffocate them in a frenzied rush to the court, and certainly after “Spitgate,” Ohio State will be eager for redemption. Very eager.So what’s the message here? It’s not a criticism of the Badgers. In fact, it’s really hard to criticize a team that hasn’t lost any of its four games in February. Wisconsin survived Purdue to begin the month, smacked Michigan State in the mouth five days later, outlasted Iowa on the road and knocked off Ohio State, something 24 other teams couldn’t do this year.Rather, it’s that for all the Badgers have done this year – namely record the first triple-double in UW history (Josh Gasser), rise to No. 10 in both polls and have two players (Taylor and Jon Leuer) named Big Ten Player of the Week – there’s still more to be done.Winning on the road is absolutely near the top of the list. No matter how many games Wisconsin wins at home, a sub-.500 road record won’t impress anybody come March. The Badgers are 5-5 away from the Kohl Center right now (including neutral site games). After Wednesday’s trip to Purdue, Wisconsin still travels to Michigan, Indiana and Ohio State. The Big Ten Tournament will be in Indianapolis, and the NCAA Tournament could be anywhere. Anywhere!Wisconsin also needs to improve from the foul line – but not by making more free throws. The Badgers are still the nation’s top team in that regard, sinking 82.4 percent of their attempts from the charity stripe.Rather, they need to get there more often. Wisconsin averages 24 free throw attempts per game – 341st in the nation. Yes, there are absolutely extenuating circumstances. The Badgers’ style of play – run the offense, find the best shot possible and make it – doesn’t lend itself to creating many possessions. In fact, Wisconsin averages just 58.5 trips down the floor per game, 345th in the nation.In case you’re not up on your Division I schools, that’s last. But it also doesn’t matter. The Badgers make the best of those possessions, averaging 1.19 points per. That’s tied with Saint Mary’s and South Dakota State for tops in the country.With that in mind, just imagine if Wisconsin got to the line more, particularly in the first half. Granted, games sometimes operate differently in each half. Refs occasionally tighten up in second halves, teams are forced into fouling late, etc. But against Ohio State, for instance, Wisconsin got to the line just twice in the first half. At Iowa, the Badgers got there four times in the opening half and just seven times overall (including overtime).In those two games, Wisconsin was trailing at halftime. With a few more trips to the line, the story could have been different. Leading at halftime can be a big deal, too. Coaches always talk about carrying momentum into the break, seemingly knowing they won’t make many effective changes during halftime.The Badgers led by as many as six in the first half against the Buckeyes, but OSU went into halftime up two. Then, they came out and built a 15-point lead. Yes, Wisconsin survived, but it won’t be able to rely on Taylor’s Superman act every night.Again, this isn’t an attempt at criticism. Rather, its an attempt at addressing the fact that Wisconsin, like it so regularly seems to do, won’t be able to fly under the radar and surprise the nation come March. Not after Saturday, not with Jordan Taylor on the roster and certainly not with all the additional press coming Madison’s way.Mike is a junior majoring in journalism and communication arts. What do you think the Badgers must do to build on their recent success? Let him know at mfiammetta@badgerherald.com and follow him on Twitter @mikefiammetta.last_img read more

Provost Quick discusses plans for future

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first_imgQuick and to the point · In an interview with the Daily Trojan, Quick discussed his background and planned goals for the University. – Courtesy of USC NewsIn an interview with the Daily Trojan, Provost Michael Quick emphasized the importance of including student response when creating initiatives for the University. He plans to measure the effectiveness of these newly developed programs aimed at student access and opportunity.Daily Trojan: As a first-generation college student yourself, do you plan to initiate more programs or encourage more communication at USC concerning first-generation college students?Michael Quick: Yeah absolutely, not even just because I was a first generation, but it does give you a nice perspective … and we have a large number, 15 percent of any class or more are first generation college-goers. And especially at a big place like USC … I’m so proud [of] the diversity USC has. That often means we’re going to have more people from interesting backgrounds, that means we’re going to have more programs in place that allow for things to happen. I know, for example, that Professor George Sanchez in [the] Dornsife [College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences] is setting up a big program with support of the University, a program about first-generation college-goers. … I’m looking forward to meeting with a number of people and various schools because you know it’s different at every school.DT: How has your extensive science background aided you as USC’s provost and more specifically within your goals for environmental sustainability?MQ:  Being a scientist, how do we think about the world and our understanding of these important topics? And then, how do we implement these kinds of plans? You’re trained as a scientist to problem solve. You know there’s a problem out there you can’t figure out how it works, and you have to problem solve and come up with hypotheses. You have to figure out: if I do this, what is the likely outcome? Then, you actually run the experiment and see what the outcome is.This is a larger question not only around something like sustainability, but in everything we do, and this comes from my science [background]. I want us to be data-driven. I want to not just do something because it’s the fashionable thing. I want to see if has real outcome and real impact. You know, that’s my training as a scientist. You put a program into place — you asked about the first generation programs. Let’s do something for first-generation college-goers, but let’s assess how they are doing before the program, and how they are after. Let’s see if there is improvement, let’s be data-driven as we make our decisions. When we were talking about some of the sustainability stuff and putting those things into place, it really became a question of, “what are things we can put into place that can have impact and how are we going to measure that impact so that it happens?” And that came from my scientific background.DT: Last April, you said you wanted to increase your involvement with the student community. How are you planning to do so?MQ: I’ve really tried to keep the door open. I’ve been meeting a lot of students. All they have to do is email me, and I’m happy to get together with them. … We’re going to have forums where I will have more opportunities to interact with different students. I’d like to do more informal things. I’ve been talking with the student government and other groups. … I am more than happy to get out there and meet people in informal settings and try to better understand what concerns them, what they like or don’t like about where the University is going — to get a real flavor for what we’re doing. I teach a class in the spring every year because I love to continue to get input, to not only teach students, but also get input from other students. It’s a neuroscience class. That’s one way I do it. But I really am open to interacting with more students and seeing more students. I want to be completely accessible.DT: Last April you said a major goal was to fix the “big problems of the 21st century.” Based on the recent resolutions to increase environmental sustainability and decrease campus racial bias, what other “big problems” need more discussion?MQ: Yeah, so those are two great ones, I’ve been using the phrase, ‘wicked problem’ — it has kind of resonated with people. I like that because these are big, in some ways, somewhat intractable problems. They are not really like easy solutions because sometimes you know if you work on this part of the problem, you create more problems over here; so that’s what makes them ‘wicked.’When I think about — and  this is something we’re doing, a strategic plan right now for the University — in thinking about in the next five years or 10 years or whatever, what are we going to tackle as a university? I think there are two pieces to that. The first part of wicked problems is what are the wicked problems, and I think that’s an easier list to make … the second part though is the tougher one, which is to ask at USC — we want USC to be a leader, we don’t just want to partially tackle this problem — what’s the wicked problem USC wants to solve … and that’s what we’re going to try and figure out in talking to people over the next several months. But to give you one possibility, and one that we’re actually we’re really suited to do, is around the concept of aging. Aging is becoming a huge issue … and it becomes a question of aging and healthy aging and unhealthy aging, and if you have to think about people are living longer, but are they living well? […] It’s a social question, it’s an economic question, a question of social justice and social welfare, a question of the arts and the humanities. How do we engage people throughout their lives in being human? That’s a big problem, and it’s a big, expensive problem … that’s one we could tackle in a big way and it would have a huge lasting impact on the world. Whether we choose aging or not, I don’t know — I’m just giving that as an example — but that’s the kind of thing [where] we really want to say, “USC is working on these big hard problems and we’re making [a] huge contribution.”DT: In November, USG presented the campus climate resolution asking for $100 million to fund additional resources to increase awareness of the present racial bias at the university. How can the resolution inform students unaware of these issues?MQ: The resolution came out and I came out with my sort of immediate response, and now we’re working through it. That’s what I love about universities is you get a lot of smart people having these conversations, you come up with a really good idea of what we’re doing. All these are in place: we have the diversity committee that is having conversations, inviting people in, and getting voices. … I’ve got a meeting coming up very [soon] with the diversity liaison for every school, so that’s about to happen. So things are in motion and the conversations are going on. I think a lot of that is going really well. … What I love about what the students have been doing here — and the faculty is taking really seriously — is engaging in really intelligent conversations about how do you put this in place so that it’s going to last a long time and really have [an] impact. Then it gets back to, for me, data driven. … We can always call for this or that, but at the end of the day, is it having an impact? Whatever we put in place I want to make sure we can measure we are having an impact.last_img read more

USC fails to escape Arizona with win

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first_imgThe USC women’s soccer team completed a wild weekend in Arizona with two double-overtime games, fighting to a 1-1 tie in an intense game against Arizona on Sunday and losing a close one in Tempe to Arizona State 5-4 on Friday.“Our fitness really came through today,” said USC coach Ali Khosroshahin when asked about a pair of weekend games in the Arizona weather. “It’s hard to play in this kind of weather at 2:00 and 1:30 both matches.“Stalemate · Junior midfielder Autumn Altamirano was unable to lead the Women of Troy past Arizona on Sunday afternoon. The game ended in a 1-1 tie. – Joseph Chen | Daily TrojanIn Sunday’s game, freshman forward Whitney Pitalo slipped a shot past Arizona goalkeeper Gabby Kaufman in the first half, tipping in a pass from freshman midfielder April Juarez to give USC (4-5-2) a 1-0 lead. The Women of Troy stayed aggressive, stopping the Arizona offense on numerous occasions and generating numerous scoring opportunities, with junior midfielder Elizabeth Eddy and freshman forward Katie Johnson getting into 1-on-1 chances against Kaufman. But Kaufman was able to stop both attempts.A USC foul set up a free kick for forward Jazmin Ponce of the Wildcats in the 88th minute. Jazmin kicked it into the box, where midfielder Jessica Culver was able to tap it into the goal to tie the game at one and send the game into overtime.The Women of Troy looked determined throughout the overtime period, constantly attacking the goal and keeping the ball on Arizona’s side of the field. Johnson, junior midfielder Haley Boysen and freshman forward Megan Borman all had good looks at the net, but Kaufman stopped them all, causing the final whistle to blow after 110 minutes of play in a tie game.USC also played an overtime match on Friday night against Arizona State.Throughout the match USC struggled to contain forward Cali Farquharson, who posted a hat trick in regulation and set up midfielder Tommi Goodman with the game-winning goal in the second overtime. Farquharson scored both goals in the first half for the Sun Devils, including a tally five minutes after Boysen scored in the 22nd minute, giving the Sun Devils a 2-1 lead at halftime.A shot by Johnson in the 31st minute that appeared to pass the goal line was nabbed by Arizona State goalkeeper Chandler Morris before the referees noticed. The Pac-12 Networks’ broadcast would later clearly show it crossing the line.After ASU scored opened a 3-1 lead, the Women of Troy came back from a two-goal deficit for the third time in their last four games, thanks to a pair of goals by sophomore midfielder Alex Quincey. Farquharson scored her third goal in the 86th minute to give ASU the lead, but junior midfielder Autumn Altamirano answered with an equalizer in the 89th minute.The Women of Troy were undone by late ejections, including Khosroshahin, senior forward Samantha Johnson and Altamirano, leaving them with nine players on the field for the overtime period.Despite holding off ASU in the first overtime, Goodman was able to score off a rebound in the 101st minute.Arizona State outshot the Women of Troy 35-14 and won 9-4 in corner kicks. Sophomore goalkeeper Caroline Stanley finished with a career-high 12 saves.“Considering all that happened on Friday, the ladies showed great determination and fight,” said coach Khosroshahin said about the team’s performance this weekend.USC heads back to Los Angeles for a couple days rest before taking a trip to Oregon next weekend. The Women of Troy will play Oregon State at 1 p.m. on Friday, followed by a 1 p.m. match against at Oregon on Sunday. The game against the Beavers will be televised on Pac-12 Networks, marking the fourth-straight USC game that will be televised.last_img read more

Kiara Lewis to play at Syracuse for final year of eligibility

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first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 24, 2020 at 5:50 pm Contact David: ddschnei@syr.edu All-ACC first team point guard Kiara Lewis will return to Syracuse next season, a source confirmed to The Daily Orange on Tuesday. As a graduate student, the 2020-21 season will be Lewis’ final year of college eligibility.Lewis led the Orange in points (17.6), assists (five) and minutes (37.6) per game and was a two-time College Sports Madness national player of the week in 2019-20. She played 40 minutes or more in 12 of SU’s 31 games, including eight of the final 13 contests in the regular season. Lewis was the only Syracuse player to average more than 10 points per game. Despite SU failing to meet its usual standards last season — the Orange finished just a game over .500 and were set to miss the NCAA tournament for the first time since 2012 — Lewis’ play was a bright spot. She was the catalyst in Syracuse’s wins over then-No. 8 Florida State and then-No. 5 Louisville in the Carrier Dome. As SU’s primary ball-handler and shot-taker, Lewis was the pulse of the Orange’s offense. When she didn’t play well, neither did Syracuse. When Lewis scored a season-low two points against Virginia on Feb. 2, SU totaled just 41 points, its lowest mark in over a decade. During Syracuse’s five-game win streak that surged it from tenth to sixth in the conference standings, Lewis averaged 20 points per game.After Tiana Mangakahia announced she would miss the 2019-20 season on Aug. 1, 2019 amid her battle with breast cancer, Lewis was thrust into the starting point guard role. The Chicago native sat out the 2017-18 season due to NCAA transfer rules then played behind Mangakahia in 2018-19. Next season, Lewis and Mangakahia will likely be the Orange’s two starting guards.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We’re going to have a very explosive guard tandem with Kiki and Tiana,” SU head coach Quentin Hillsman said on Feb. 26.  “You can pick your poison on any night.”Along with Mangakahia’s return, the Orange will add six incoming freshmen to the roster next season, including 5-star recruits Kamilla Cardoso and Priscilla Williams. Cardoso, the No. 5 overall recruit according to the espnW 100, is a 6-foot-6 forward with “court vision like a guard that can run like a deer,” SU assistant coach DeLisha Milton-Jones said on Jan. 29. Among Syracuse’s other incoming recruits are guards Faith Blackstone, Khamya McNeal, Laura Salmeron and Kiara Fisher.The Orange will lose Gabrielle Cooper, Elemy Colomé, Whisper Fisher and Brooke Alexander to graduation. Cooper started all 31 of SU’s games in the backcourt alongside Lewis in 2019-20 and recorded the second-most minutes per game (36.7) on the team. Commentslast_img read more

Dallas Stars’ Corey Perry did the ‘walk of shame’ — and Twitter had a field day with it

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first_imgThe Winter Classic is a premier event on the NHL’s calendar and this year’s version was no different. But for Dallas Stars forward Corey Perry, it was over in a mere two minutes and 44 seconds when he was ejected for elbowing the Nashville Predators’ Ryan Ellis in the head. Ellis (concussion) did not return to the game. Normally, when a player is ejected they go right to the tunnel and to their dressing room. Well, with the rink situated in the middle of the Cotton Bowl — the walk to the Stars’ locker room on Wednesday was a little longer than usual. So, of course, Twitter did what Twitter does and had some fun with Perry’s walk of shame.The Corey Perry walk of shame, paired with “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” by Green Day just hits different. pic.twitter.com/o5dn10LmXY— Hockey Daily 365 (@HockeyDaily365) January 1, 2020Corey Perry’s walk of shame, but I added the penalty song from The World Juniors pic.twitter.com/NwRj0QPEFM— Gongshow Gary 🇨🇦 (@SuckMyDeke) January 1, 2020I love the walk of shame for Corey Perry. Every arena needs that.— Mark Lazerus (@MarkLazerus) January 1, 2020The Corey Perry walk of shame but I added 500 miles by the Proclaimers pic.twitter.com/2WEqbBjwpU— Maddy Harris (@maddelynharris) January 1, 2020Thank you .@soIoucity for the inspiration #coreyperry #NSHvsDAL #WinterClassic2020 pic.twitter.com/6VBg6KCdbD— Pamela Voorhees (@PamelaVoorhee10) January 1, 2020I’d say throw the book at Corey Perry, but my gosh, that walk of shame might just cut deep enough for him to learn his lessonOuch 😣 #WinterClassic2020 #WinterClassic #NHL @NHL— Daniel Carcillo (@CarBombBoom13) January 2, 2020Corey Perry’s walk of shame but his footsteps are Squidward’s pic.twitter.com/CY5BQAYWzt— NSH NewYear’scats (@NSHHousecats) January 2, 2020Corey Perry doing a walk of shame looking like many of you in your heels and sweatshirts this morning— Sara Civ (@SaraCivian) January 1, 2020Curb Your Corey Perry Ejection pic.twitter.com/vHWlx763CH— Jeff Veillette (@JeffVeillette) January 1, 2020last_img read more