Tag: 龙凤论坛信息网

BAHAMAS NO DUMPING Signage Placed at NewlyCleared Vacant Lots in OvertheHill

No Comments

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, February 22, 2018 – Nassau – The Over-the-Hill Community Development Partnership Initiative has  completed its bulk-waste removal and clean-up campaign in Bain & Grant’s Town and Centreville.  The initiative is now in the process of placing signage on several of the vacant lots that were cleared as part of project.Signs like the one pictured were placed at Fritz Lane, Thompson Lane, and Strachan Corner on Wednesday, February 21, 2018.(BIS Photos/Raymond A. Bethel, Sr.) Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img

Hearst Taps Valerie Salembier as Publisher Chief Revenue Officer for Town Country

No Comments

first_imgHearst Magazines named Valerie Salembier [pictured] as senior vice president, publisher and chief revenue officer of Town & Country. She will report to Hearst Magazines president, marketing and publishing director Michael A. Clinton and replaces Jim Taylor, who is relocating to Massachusetts. Salembier most recently served as senior vice president and publisher of Harper’s Bazaar, where she will be replaced by Carol A. Smith, former senior vice president and chief brand officer of Elle. Both appointments are effective June 1. In 2011, Salembier was named to the min Sales Executive of the Year Hall of Fame. She also served as vice president and publisher of Esquire from 1996 to 2003, where she was credited with a significant bottom-line turnaround. Ad pages for Town & Country slipped 1.3 percent to 209.96 while Harper’s Bazaar was down 11.3 percent to 370.39 in the first quarter of 2011, according to Publisher’s Information Bureau.last_img read more

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Fasulo Sullivan Will Control Growth Best Suited To

No Comments

first_imgDear Editor,It is with extreme honor and without any hesitation that I write to endorse Rob Fasulo and Sue Sullivan for Selectman of Wilmington.Following two tours in Iraq and honorable discharge from the US Army, my wife and I were looking for a home where we could set down roots.  My wife enjoyed the conveniences of the city while I preferred the quiet of the country. After much research we found our happy medium and perfect town, Wilmington.  Seven years and two children later we know we made the right choice.Soon after moving to town my wife called Rob Fasulo to ask a simple question about her new-found bee keeping hobby.  Rob not only offered advice, he came to the house to lend a hand. Two things we learned about8 Rob- He has a deep appreciation and respect for veterans, and he takes great pride in the town of Wilmington. Not only has he grown up here, he is also raising his three children here. He volunteers his time to attend town meetings and pushes for change when he believes the citizens are not being fairly represented.April 27th will be a historical day in our town.  Three of the board seats are open and who gets elected will determine the future of our town.  Although we love Wilmington my wife and I share some concerns.The first is growth, just from my front lawn I can see three new homes that went up in the past year.  And it seems construction is everywhere.  I am also hearing of multiple condo units going up in the next few years.  While I love that our town is expanding for more families to enjoy I worry that this growth maybe happening too fast and without a plan.  How will be accommodate our police department? Fire department? Our schools? When my wife signed my son up for kindergarten last month, she overheard the school was close to capacity with only 11 slots left (and more registration days ahead).  Also, Wilmington high school went from being able to serve 1020 children to 960. Knowing the town is growing in population why in the world are we building smaller schools? Rob Fasulo is for responsible growth and wants to work with the town on a realistic plan to aid public services in how to navigate the town’s ever-increasing population.Our second concern is the Olin site.  After moving to town, we began hearing rumblings about this site and the dangers to resident’s health.  Looking further we began reading about Sue Sullivan.  A mom who felt SO passionately about the health of our town’s children she spearheaded a movement to get the site tested and is still working hard to get the site cleaned.  My wife and I did a bit of research into Olin and what we uncovered is down right SCARY. As a town this is not a “pretty” topic to discuss-but this NEEDS to be something the town recognizes and deal with. As of last week we heard the Olin site will be entered into the Administrator’s Emphasis List for Superfund sites for “immediate intense action”.  This is a VERY significant turn of events and I feel it is imperative and in the best interest of the town to have Sue Sullivan on the board of selectman.  There is no one more knowledgeable about this site and its dangers to our town’s people than Sue and I know without a doubt she will fight to get the site clean. 2019 marks the 20thyear since the Olin site’s cancer study and we still do not have answers. In order for our town’s true interest to be protected Rob Fasulo and Sue Sullivan need to be elected.Wilmington is a fantastic town but we still have a number of issues that need resolve.  I firmly believe that Sue Sullivan and Rob Faluso will do the job! Rob and Sue come from opposite sides of the political spectrum but have come together threw their passion to make Wilmington the best it can be. I know without a doubt they will work tirelessly to represent our town keeping in mind our elderly, veterans, children, families and public service workers.I ask you to consider both Sue Sullivan and Rob Fasulo when casting your votes April 27th.Sincerely,Zachary KysarLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedLETTER TO THE EDITOR: Selectman Mike McCoy Endorses Rob Fasulo For SelectmanIn “Letter To The Editor”LETTER TO THE EDITOR: If You Want Change, Vote Fasulo & Sullivan For SelectmenIn “Letter To The Editor”LETTER TO THE EDITOR: School Committee Member MJ Byrnes Endorses Fasulo & Sullivan For SelectmenIn “Letter To The Editor”last_img read more

Apollo missions took humans to the moon and my dad helped

No Comments

first_imgThat was no easy task, considering the astronauts were strapped inside a capsule perched on top of a Saturn V rocket containing the more than a half-million gallons of fuel and 400,000 gallons of liquid oxygen necessary to push the Apollo spacecraft out of the Earth’s atmosphere. That was also enough to feed an explosion equivalent to 2 kilotons of TNT. The escape tower In the event of a launch emergency, the job of quickly separating the crew from the Saturn V rocket would fall to the launch escape tower, essentially another, much smaller rocket mounted above the capsule that would pull it from the launch vehicle and deploy a parachute when it was a safe distance away. A test of the Apollo Launch Escape System in June 1965 shows the escape tower rocket firing and lifting the capsule.The escape tower lifts a capsule during a test of the Apollo Launch Escape System in June 1965. NASA A series of explosive bolts held the escape tower in place until either an emergency use during an aborted launch or its scheduled jettison three minutes after liftoff. Keeping those bolts in place until either of those events occurred could save lives and prevent damage to the launch vehicle. But the bolts’ stability was threatened by the ocean of radio wave and electromagnetic interference swirling around the rocket before launch, which could inadvertently detonate the devices. A team of engineers, including my father, was responsible for putting the bolts through a battery of tests to identify vulnerabilities that might arise from the various radio frequencies being used on the launch pad, as well as static electricity originating from the electrical systems. While these tests were being conducted in the mountains outside of Los Angeles in early 1967, the importance of the team’s work was hammered home when the three astronauts in the Apollo 1 crew died in a swift but powerful capsule fire on the other side of the country. The fire that killed Roger Chaffee, Virgil “Gus” Grissom and Ed White — during a launch dress rehearsal for the first manned trip around the moon — was caused by a combination of a cabin full of pure oxygen, combustible materials and vulnerable wiring, according to the NASA summary. Manned Apollo flights were suspended for nearly two years while the program underwent review and redesign. The investigation determined that the Command Module — the capsule in which the astronauts would ride into space and back — was extremely hazardous but also found the test’s emergency preparedness to be inadequate. The disaster led to several design, manufacturing and procedural changes. It also highlighted the risk astronauts faced even on the ground, certainly a concern for my father, who was so dedicated to the process that he was at the remote testing site a few days after the fire, when my mother went into labor with me. A military escort ensured that my father was in the delivery room in time. My dad, Victor Musil, with my oldest brother, around the time Dad was working on safety testing related to the escape tower.My dad, Victor Musil, with my oldest brother, around the time Dad was working on safety testing related to the escape tower. Family photo by Judith Tustin Two and a half years later, all those NASA efforts paid off when, on July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped onto the surface of the moon. My family had taken a quick drive that day down the coast to San Diego to visit the Palomar Observatory, with hopes of seeing the spacecraft orbiting the moon through the Hale Telescope. Unfortunately, my parents, my older brothers and I missed the actual moon landing when my dad’s Jeep had two flat tires on the way home, but we were back in Torrance in front of our 21-inch black-and-white TV in time to watch Armstrong deliver his famous speech. Click here for To The Moon, a CNET multipart series examining our relationship with the moon from the first landing of Apollo 11 to future human settlement on its surface. Robert Rodriguez/CNET NASA would go on to make five more moon landings between 1969 and 1972, and the escape tower never had to be used by astronauts during a launch. A NASA report compiled in 1973 found that no failure of the pyrotechnic devices was detected during any of the Apollo missions. The reliability of the bolts was attributed, “in large measure,” to the testing techniques, among other things (PDF). It was one of the many small components of an enormous project, and though my dad was soft-spoken and not one to brag, he was proud of the contribution he made to the Apollo program and privately considered it one of the highlights of his career. And who wouldn’t be proud of helping achieve something that had previously been a fantasy for the ages? Originally published Oct. 13, 2018. Update, July 14, 2019: Adds  information on Apollo 11’s 50th anniversary. NASA’s bid to get humans back to the moon To the Moon 5:20 Tags The part of the Apollo missions my father worked on is shown at the top of this image from the Apollo 11 launch on July 16, 1969. NASA I was 13 years old when I learned my father had worked on NASA’s Apollo moon missions. Perhaps I could be forgiven for being initially skeptical. It had been nearly a decade since astronauts last visited the moon, and the moment he chose to impart this information to me, we were settling into our seats on the old Mission to Mars ride at Disneyland, awaiting our launch for a brief capsule ride to the Red Planet before a scripted malfunction required a hasty but safe return to Earth. But the story my dad was about to share with me was no fantasy or fairy tale, nor was it as dramatic or glamorous as those that Hollywood makes movies about. With the 50th anniversary of NASA’s first trip to the moon this week, I’ve been reflecting on what it meant to be a child of the 1960s and ’70s caught up in the excitement of the moon missions. The launches, the increasingly ambitious missions, were events that punctuated the life of a young schoolboy who choked down Tang — a fruit-flavored powdered drink mix made popular by NASA missions — with hopes of being an astronaut but unaware of the contribution his own father had already made. My dad spent decades working as an engineer for aerospace and defense contractors in Southern California, including TRW, Litton Industries and Magnavox. He shared little, either due to the highly technical nature of his work or more likely because of restrictions related to his security clearance. While his work may have been a mystery to me, his love of space travel wasn’t. He came of age as the space race was gearing up and had a keen interest in the space program. When my brothers and I were children, our dad would wake us up early on launch days so we could watch the event with him on TV (no DVRs then). He used the backyard telescope to show us the landing sites for the Apollo missions. Sci-Tech As with any massive undertaking, it’s important to understand there were hundreds of thousands of people involved, and I don’t want to give the impression that my father was rubbing elbows with Gene Kranz or Chris Kraft at the Mission Control Center in Houston. (Although, like many of the era, he would’ve looked the part, complete with his close-cropped hair, horn-rimmed glasses and white short-sleeve dress shirt with a prominent pocket protector.) Like those other thousands of people who lent a hand, he made a small but vital contribution that helped lead to a successful mission. While many of the participants were largely focused on getting the astronauts to the moon and back safely, my dad’s focus was on keeping them safe on the ground while they awaited launch. This story is part of To the Moon, a series exploring humanity’s first journey to the lunar surface and our future living and working on the moon. Apollo 11 moon landing: Neil Armstrong’s defining momentcenter_img 35 Photos Share your voice Now playing: Watch this: Moon landing 50th anniversary: How Apollo 11 fired up the space race Apollo: Missions to the Moon documentary creates a virtual time machine One Giant Leap shows Apollo’s missions were a giant tech leap for all of us Related stories Post a comment 0 NASA Spacelast_img read more

James Patterson to Visit Baltimore and Donate 25000 books

No Comments

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — James Patterson’s next stop on his literacy crusade is Baltimore.In this May 3, 2006, file photo, author James Patterson contemplates a question during an interview at his home overlooking the Intracoastal Waterway in Palm Beach, Fla. Patterson, who has donated millions to bookstores and libraries nationwide and formed his own publishing imprint, is visiting Baltimore on Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015, and will donate 25,000 copies of his illustrated children’s book “Public School Superhero.” (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)The best-selling author, who has donated millions of dollars to bookstores and libraries nationwide and formed his own publishing imprint, is visiting Baltimore next week and will donate 25,000 copies of his illustrated children’s book “Public School Superhero,” the heroic adventures of a black sixth grader. Patterson told The Associated Press on Tuesday that the uprising following the death of Freddie Gray in police custody made him anxious to come to Baltimore.“I like the city very much, and I think part of the reason is that it reminds me of where I grew up, Newburgh (in New York), which is a smaller but also very tough river town,” Patterson said during a telephone interview.“So watching what’s been happening to kids in Baltimore made me think, ‘How I can help?’ And I thought the best thing I can do is try to keep ringing the bell and get kids reading.”On Sept. 16, he plans to meet with civic leaders, including members of the city council and school and library officials, and with some 300 fifth graders. Patterson will be giving a copy of “Public School Superhero” to every Baltimore public school kid from grades 3 to 7.last_img read more

Minister Robbed in West Baltimore Prior to Christmas Eve Service

No Comments

first_imgA Baltimore minister was robbed at gunpoint at the 4400 block of Park Heights Ave. on Dec. 24 just after arriving to a parking lot near his church in preparation for a Christmas Eve service.The Rev. Earl Blue, 65, was uninjured in the Christmas Eve attack during which he was assaulted by four assailants in a parking lot.The clergyman is pastor of Jehovah Jireh Holistic Ministry, a partner with the I Can’t We Can Counseling Center.Baltimore police have a video from a surveillance camera of the attackers, one of whom was armed with a handgun. In the video, the robbers can be seen in a vehicle prowling through the parking lot before the attack took place.Police are on the lookout for the perpetrators’ vehicle, a black Honda, and the pastor’s, a red 2017 Nissan Rogue. The robbers demanded Rev. Blue’s wallet, cash and car keys at the announcement of the robbery, but his phone was returned before the assailants made their escape. Rev. Blue said he was almost struck by one of the assailants’ fleeing vehicles.Baltimore Police Capt. Jarron Jackson called the suspects “cowardly” in their attack on a 65-year-old minister but seasoned in their level of preparation.“This isn’t their first-time crime. They didn’t wake up at five and say, ‘I’m going to rob somebody at six,’ for the first time,” Jackson said in a public statement.While contemplating snatching the weapon at the outset, Rev. Blue said to WBAL reporters he felt God give him a more sympathetic outlook.“I just had compassion for them. I hope God will touch them, and the violence will stop,” Blue told WBAL reporters.The police have not identified any suspects and the AFRO was directed to social media for any other developments in the investigation. At the close of the week, BPD had not released any additional updates pertaining to the unsolved crime.Police are asking for the public to call Citywide Robbery Unit detectives at 410-366-6341 or Metro Crime Stoppers at 1-866-7Lockup. Tips can also be texted to 443-902-4824.last_img read more