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Guerrilla Archiving: The Resistance takes on #DataRescue

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first_imgA new movement to secure and protect scientific information some fear will be lost throughout the Trump Administration is gaining traction across the United States.Guerrilla archiving, the effort to copy government website data onto independent servers, hopes to safeguard irreplaceable scientific information from political interference.Some environmentalists think the notoriously climate-hostile Trump Administration will intentionally delete public data on climate change, pollution, renewable energy, and more. Yet most do not see the malicious deleting of data as a threat due to the high risk of political backlash.Instead, environmentalists are scared that valuable information will be lost through the chaos of transition, downsizing of the Environmental Protection Agency, and environmental deregulation. Eric Holthaus, a meteorologist and journalist who helped launch the guerrilla archiving movement explains, “the biggest concern is that, either through budget cuts or neglect or tough changing priorities, some data is lost or at least access to it is lost.”Surprisingly enough, there is no federal system in place to protect and archive government website material. Indeed in 2008, the National Archives and Records Administration controversially decided to not record snapshots of government webpages.In December, the University of Toronto formally kicked off the movement with a conference entitled “Guerrilla Archiving: Saving Environmental Data from the Trump Administration.” The event was co-hosted by Internet Archive, a San Francisco based nonprofit that aims to archive United States Government websites that are at risk during political transitions.The event brought together a wide range of participants: scientists, coders, librarians, archivers, and many other tech savvy types. Decentralized in nature, the conference allowed different groups to focus on varying infrastructure priorities or policy areas.Librarians made sure data was correctly archived so it could still be used in professional research. Coders worked to streamline the data harvesting process. Scientists pinpointed certain research areas and datasets that could be at risk. Everyone had a place at the table.Since the Toronto event, similar action days have sprung up across the country, primarily in cities with burgeoning tech industries. In March, there will be guerrilla archiving events in New Haven, Ct., Madison, Wi., and Houston, Tx.Guerrilla archiving workflow has also been formalized for the masses through a custom built “Archivers” app. The mobile app allows individuals to check what government websites are yet to be archived and to then feed pages into Internet Archive’s End of Term database. If the specific page is too complex to download, the page can be flagged for further technical attention.Through action events and the Archive app, guerrilla archiving aims to empower citizens to secure and protect federal digital records–records that are not only important to our Earth, but our collective history.last_img read more

Australia plans to force Google, Facebook to pay for news

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first_imgTHE Australian government has unveiled its plan to force tech giants such as Google and Facebook to pay news outlets for their content. Facebook and Google strongly oppose the proposal, even suggesting they could walk away from Australia’s news market. Frydenberg said the code of conduct – drafted by Australia’s competition regulator – would be debated by parliament. The code will initially focus on Google and Facebook but could be expanded to other tech companies, the treasurer said. (BBC) It could impose “substantial penalties” worth hundreds of millions of dollars on tech companies which fail to comply, he said. Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said the “world-leading” draft code of conduct aimed to give publishers “a level playing field to ensure a fair go.” Many news outlets have shut or shed jobs this year amid falling profits.last_img read more

Ripley County Prosecutor Releases Statement Regarding Holton Shooting

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first_imgRIPLEY COUNTY, Ind. — Members of law enforcement have worked continuously since late Friday after the police action shooting near Holton.According to Ripley County Prosecuting Attorney, Ric Hertel, the initial call came as a result of a domestic altercation that had taken place at the residence.Multiple law enforcement agencies responded to the residence which led to the homeowner, Timothy Bowman, firing at the officers.Bowman was struck by return fire from law enforcement and then remained in his home until later that night when he ultimately surrendered to the Indiana State Police Emergency Response Team.Two search warrants were authorized that night by Judge Sharp to search for and seize any evidence of a crime including firearms and ammunition along with Bowman.Those were served that night into the next day.Hertel noted that he will meet with detectives from the Indiana State Police as their investigation continues to determine appropriate charges.That decision may come as early as this week.last_img read more

RCCF celebrates 20 years

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first_imgRIPLEY COUNTY, Ind. — The Ripley County Community Foundation is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year.The foundation started in 1997 when a group of individuals gathered to create a permanent source of grant dollars to benefit the quality of life in Ripley County.With the assistance of Lilly Endowment and the Rising Sun Regional Foundation, they established the Ripley County Community Foundation.Over the past two decades, the foundation has given over $14 million to the Ripley County community.To celebrate 20 years, the foundation will grant $2,000 each month to a different local organization that is striving to improve the quality of life of those they serve.last_img

Dzeko agent denies Roma link

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first_img The Italian press has fuelled speculation that the Bosnia and Herzegovina international will move to the Giallorossi as part of a deal that would see Roma playmaker Adem Ljajic join City. Roma midfielder Miralem Pjanic said earlier this week that his compatriot Dzeko would go “running” to Roma but his agent Irfan Redzepagic brushed aside that claim. Press Association The agent of Manchester City striker Edin Dzeko has denied reports he had talks with Roma over a possible transfer of the player to the Serie A club. center_img “I was frankly surprised by Pjanic’s comments, unless he knows something that I don’t,” Redzepagic told Italian radio station Rete Sport. “I have had no contact with Roma, nor am I aware of any talks between the two clubs. “It’s not a financial issue, he simply doesn’t want to leave the Citizens.” Dzeko joined City from Wolfsburg in 2011 and is under contract with the Blues outfit for another three seasons. The 29-year-old endured a difficult campaign, making just 12 Premier League starts for Manuel Pellegrini’s side and scoring six goals. last_img read more

500 run in fourth annual Bridge the Gap race

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first_img Latest posts by (see all) Real Estate Transfers Week of Sept. 17 – September 18, 2020 Latest Posts Drive-thru flu shot clinics scheduled – September 18, 2020 Bio VERONA ISLAND — Some 500 runners ran across the Penobscot Narrows Bridge on Sunday for the fourth annual Bridge the Gap series of races.Participants took off from Fort Knox at 10 a.m. After crossing over the river, runners separated into three groups, with 223 running the 5K and 152 completing the 10-mile loop around Verona Island. Kids participating in the one-mile Fun Run stopped at the Verona Island Picnic Area.For the 10-mile race, Peter Kraus, 24, of Dresden finished first for the men in 57:51, and Sarah Mulcahy, 29, of Baring Plantation placed first for the women in 1:02:52.In the 5K, Emil Pazdziorko, 47, of Gardiner placed first for the men in 19:51; and Rachael Button, 29, of Dresden took first for the women in 20:30.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textClick here for results of the 10-miler.Click here for results from the 5K. Donald Trump Jr. to host Holden campaign event – September 18, 2020last_img read more

Ifeanyi Ubah Grassroots Soccer Gets June Date

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first_imgThe first edition of the Chief Ifeanyi Ubah sponsored Grassroots Soccer Championships will flag-off in June in Anambra state.The competition according to the sponsor would see all the 127 communities in Anambra battle for supremacy in an event that would run from June to October 2016.The youthful Chief Ifeanyi Ubah, who is also the Chairman of the Anambra State Football Association, noted that, he has decided to bankroll the competition “so as to make sure all the youths in the state are engaged in the competition aimed at ensuring that talented youngsters who have hitherto been hidden in the grassroots without the opportunity of showcasing their talents are given the leverage to come to the front burner.He stressed that, the competition which is one of his programmes to move football forward in the state would be played in a league format for five months across the communities that would also involve the three senatorial districts in Anambra. “The 127 teams would be reduced to 64 after the first round and later to 32 teams, before the round of 16 which is the final round that would be played on round robin. The beauty of the competition is that at this stage, the 20 best players in the competition would be selected by a team of soccer experts that involved former national team coaches. These selected 20 players will be groomed and sponsored to take part in a FIFA recognized international soccer tournament in China in November.”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Syracuse heads into final two weeks of season hoping to end on positive note

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first_img Published on November 21, 2013 at 1:07 am Contact Eric: esriter@syr.edu Following Friday’s loss against Pittsburgh, the slim chances that Syracuse had at making it to the NCAA tournament vanished.The Orange wants to win, but with nothing to play for, it is hard to keep going. Instead, SU sets goals for the final two weeks of the season.“To get better,” head coach Leonid Yelin said. “With everyone coming back next year, we just want to build something for next year.”The Orange (14-14, 9-7 Atlantic Coast) will hit the road this weekend to face Clemson (13-14, 7-9) on Friday at 7 p.m. and Georgia Tech (10-18, 4-12) on Sunday at 1 p.m. SU played these two teams at home earlier in the season, beating both in convincing fashion, but when it faces them this weekend it will try to work on the little things, including getting blockers involved and serving.Syracuse will finish its season with a home game against Boston College on Wednesday at 7 p.m. and then a trip to South Bend, Ind., next Saturday against Notre Dame at 2 p.m.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textComing into the season, the Orange wasn’t expected to contend in its first ACC season. SU was only ranked at No. 12 in the ACC’s preseason rankings. Winning 8-of-10 propelled Syracuse up to seventh going into the weekend. The Orange felt underestimated even during its recent run of success.“At the beginning of the year many people underestimated us,” outside hitter Nicolette Serratore said. “We have started to prove ourselves though. People think it is a fluke that we have won these games. So we just want to prove that we are a stable team and bigger threat next year.” Although the tournament chances have slipped away, Yelin and the players say there are still things they can work on. One of these issues is getting the middle blockers more involved in the game. Having the middle blockers more involved with the game makes a team’s game more unpredictable. They are the first ones able to touch the ball from the setters’ hands.“You have to play to them since they are the first step to hit the ball,” Yelin said. “If you are not going to use them, nobody is going to pay attention to then and everybody else is going to face the double block. So it is a balance to find out when to use them and how often to use them.”This burden falls on the hands of freshman setter Erica Handley. Just three weeks removed from winning her first-ever ACC Freshman of the Week Honors, Handley now has another. After her strong performance this weekend, she garnered attention for the award.One thing that she struggled with this weekend was serving. Handley had three aces, but she still feels like she missed too many serves.“Missing serves comes with aggressiveness,” Handley said “We do not just want to lollipop it over the net and give them an easy serve receive. So I just have to try and minimize that.”Yelin says it is not just one player, but also a collective issue. He also acknowledges the balance that must exist between serving it harder or softer over the net.“Without going with an aggressive serve, you put yourself defensively in a really tough situation,” Yelin said. “These are two things, with the serve and serve receive, that if you are doing these two things better you start winning.”He went on to explain that it is sort of a give-and-take system. Getting an ace is not the only effective way of serving. Making the ball difficult to play is something that can upset the opposing team’s setter.Syracuse looks to improve on these two things in its final four games of the season, showing that the winning is not a fluke and that it is here to stay.“We just want to win it out.” Handley said, “We want to prove that we can be a winning team. Pitt didn’t expect us to beat them the first time and I feel like that is how a lot of the conference feels about us. We just have to keep proving them wrong.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day aims to decrease disease stigma

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first_img(Left to right) Writer and director Nathan Hale Williams, cast member Nic Few and director and production designer Jennia Frederique spoke at a panel. Louis Kengi Carr | Daily TrojanWednesday marks the 18th year of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, a day established to increase awareness and decrease stigma around sexually transmitted diseases within black communities.“HIV and AIDS disproportionately affects black youth,” said Tensie Taylor, assistant director of the USC Black Alumni Association. “To see some of the USC students [saying] they don’t even talk about their STDs or HIV status with their partner, I found that alarming because part of the ways you can prevent [the diseases] is to know your status — to have the conversation.” To improve dialogue around the issue, the association worked alongside the Black AIDS Institute to host an on-campus screening of 90 Days, a film about a black couple with mixed-status HIV, in January. “One of the most effective ways to communicate [the] message about HIV and AIDS is through entertainment, is through story, is through films that actually reflect back to the community the issues that are being addressed,”  said Phill Wilson, founder and president of the Black Aids Institute. The film focused on a black woman named Jessica, who contracts HIV in college, and highlighted the high risk for women in Jessica’s demographic: Black women are 16 times more likely to acquire HIV compared to white women, according to the Black Aids Institute.“I felt like by starting this conversation, if [the screening is] successful in [going] to other colleges around the country, just to show young people [they] can prevent this,” Taylor said. HIV and AIDS have an intersectional impact on black communities, since aspects of class, gender and disability magnify the epidemic’s effect, according to Marie-Fatima Hyacinthe, a mobilization coordinator at the Black AIDS Institute. Although black Americans make up around 13 percent of the U.S. population, 45 percent of all HIV-diagnosed individuals in 2015 were black. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, gay and bisexual men are also disproportionately affected, making up 58 percent of black men diagnosed. “I think that the USC community should be paying attention to these issues because the fastest growing population being impacted by either STIs or HIV are college-aged students,” Wilson said.Wilson established the Black Aids Institute in 1999 and is working to confront HIV and AIDS in what he says is a “uniquely and unapologetically black point of view,” by mobilizing black institutions, educating people and providing services to communities.“Particularly within the LGBT communities, they are still stigmatizing language, calling people who are HIV-positive ‘dirty’ or things of that nature,” Wilson said. “The stigmas in the black communities aren’t immune from that either.”By bringing impactful awareness events, like the 90 Days screening, to campus, Taylor aims to be a part of the effort to destigmatize HIV and AIDS. “The key that I want to keep reiterating is awareness and education,” Taylor said. “Because when you know something, you have the possibility to change it and … be proactive about it.”Taylor also emphasized the necessity for USC and its student health centers to be more involved in advocating for HIV and AIDS awareness, in addition to providing faster services for students.Currently, the Engemann Student Health Center provides an HIV test that costs approximately $30, according to its website, and most tests deliver results in at least a week. Taylor suggested implementing rapid HIV tests on campus, which provide results in a few minutes and can be used in routine testing. As a result of the stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS in the black community, people are less likely to get tested and receive treatment, Hyacinthe said.White men make up the majority of pre-exposure prophylaxis prescriptions, a daily preventative HIV pill for people at risk. And only 15 percent of PrEP prescriptions were filled by women, with black women constituting an even smaller percentage, according to the Black Aids Institute. “We still see disparities based on race, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, education and region in the country where you live,” Wilson said.  But, he said he believes the U.S. has the medical capability to end the AIDS epidemic.“I just want this conversation to continue and to spread awareness and education, and to get college students talking,” Taylor said. “And so just to encourage people to know your status, be safe, protect yourself, and know that you do have it, it’s not a death sentence.”last_img read more

Top Five Highlights of the Fall Semester

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first_imgThere were many memorable highlights of the Fall 2015 semester for the Badgers across all sports. The Badger Herald has narrowed it down to our favorite five highlights. 1. Gaglianone’s kick beats NebraskaRafael Gaglianone’s redemption came at a perfect time to save his team and keep the Badgers’ dreams of reaching Indianapolis alive at the time. Gaglianone lined up for a 46-yard attempt from the right hashmark with nine seconds remaining, just one minute and 17 seconds removed from a 39-yard miss.This time, Gaglianone converted, putting Wisconsin up 23-21 and temporarily taking UW’s season off life support. The thrilling moment capped off a final-minute, game-winning drive and secured the Freedom Trophy would stay in Madison.2. Men’s hockey defeats North DakotaFor all of the disappointment the men’s hockey program had to deal with last season, winning just four games, signs of improvement became evident Nov. 6. The Badgers took down then-No. 1 North Dakota 3-1.After falling behind seven minutes into the game, Wisconsin scored three unanswered goals, with two coming in the second period. UW hunkered down in the defensive down and watched the seconds tick away toward victory as it took out the top-ranked team in the nation.3. Women’s hockey snaps Border Battle losing streak with sweepFor all of the success the women’s hockey program at UW has had, Minnesota has been its kryptonite. Four years had passed since the last time Wisconsin beat Minnesota. That all changed Dec. 4, when sophomore forward Annie Pankowski redirected a puck from in front of the net into back of the net with 55 seconds remaining in overtime.Quite the dramatic way to snap the losing streak.UW followed that effort the following day with a 3-1 win at LaBahn Arena, establishing itself at the top of the WCHA standings and in the middle of a historic winning streak.4. Volleyball advances to third-straight Sweet 16Since Kelly Sheffield took over the helm of the Wisconsin volleyball program three seasons ago, consistency has been a staple of the team. The Badgers have finished in the top four of the Big Ten in all three seasons. Currently, UW is on a 14-match winning streak.The Badgers advanced to the Sweet 16 Dec. 11 against No. 11 Florida by beating Iowa State in straight sets in front of a packed and hyped up UW Field House. The raucous atmosphere that night was symbolic of the home court advantage UW has had all season.5. Women’s soccer wins share of Big Ten titleFor all of the troubles the women’s soccer team endured during the beginning of the regular season, it showed tremendous fight and grit to emerge as one of the top teams in the Big Ten, earning a share of the Big Ten regular season title.The Badgers won eight straight matches on their way to the shared title, which came a season after the team won the Big Ten Tournament.last_img read more