Olympic Colors in Flowers

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first_img The community project from the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games offers individuals,organizations and businesses a list of plants chosen to reflect the distinctive “Look of the Games.” The plants will help people create and display the Quilt of Leaves colors for the 1996 Olympic GamesJuly 19 to Aug. 4. You may not be competing in next summer’s Olympic Games, but you can still show your truecolors as part of the Quiltscape program, said Paul Thomas, a horticulturist with the University ofGeorgia Extension Service. “The Quiltscape program gives everyone a chance to be part of the event and look like it,” he said.”You can use approved plants that are a part of the venues throughout the Games. “You can spruce up your town square, your church and school grounds, your home flower gardenor your office window box using the Quiltscape plant list,” he said. ACOG has released the “Look of the Games” plant list in the Olympic colors: blue, gold, green,purple and red. The Olympic committee worked with Extension specialists, UGA horticulture faculty, commercialdesigners and landscapers to prepare a list of plants to match the colors of the games. Plants were chosen for both sun and shade, tall and short, dry to moist growing conditions and heattolerance for Georgia’s infamous August weather. “The group went through thousands of plants and selected those that are in bloom in August andare heat-tolerant and low-risk,” Thomas said. “The listed plants should look good under most weather conditions,” he said. “ACOG wantedplants that would look good two weeks before the Games and at least a week after.” The list includes Georgia favorites such as ageratum, coleus, zinnia, butterfly bush, crape myrtle,hosta, impatiens and caladium. It also has black-eyed Susan, Christmas fern, elephant ear, crimsonfountain grass and many others. Commercial nurseries and garden centers plan to carry these selected plants to help homeownersand businesses take part in the Quiltscape program, which will officially begin in January. “These plants will be available,” Thomas said, “But if you know you’ll need a large order, Irecommend reserving your plants with your local nursery now. “Get a soil test done, decide what to do to your site and buy plants and supplies early,” he said.”With so many people involved, there may be shortages of plants and other materials like fertilizer,soil amendments, lime or pine straw.” Even with a tested plant list and the best intentions, growing flowers in August in Georgia won’t beeasy. “It’s important to know how you plan to water your plants,” Thomas said. “If it rains, no problem.But if it’s dry, you need to plan to irrigate or water early in the morning, not while visitors areadmiring your handiwork.” To make sure the plants flower on schedule, consider buying one-gallon plants rather than thesmaller bedding plants, Thomas said. “They may cost more, but they have a larger root system,” he said. “If we have our typical hot, dryAugust, small plants just won’t make it.” For a brochure on the Quiltscape program, contact ACOG, Quiltscape Program, 250 WilliamsStreet, Suite 6000, P. O. Box 1996, Atlanta, GA 30301-1996. Your county Extension agent also has the Quiltscape plant list and brochures about growingperennials and annuals for next summer or any time.last_img read more

An Intelligent Frog

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first_imgNot long ago I wrote about how to make a pond for tree frogs so they could breedwithout the predation and competition of larger frogs.Since then I’ve learned a few things about how to make such a pond. I learned much ofit from a particularly intelligent green frog.I had two little plastic ponds, each about a yard across, set flush with the ground inthe front yard. A young bullfrog moved into one. Grey tree frogs colonized the other untilthis particular green frog moved in.When he showed up, the tree frogs disappeared. So one day I caught the green frog andcarried him over to the pond with the bullfrog.He seemed to sense danger and didn’t linger long. Two days later he reappeared in theother pond. He must have hopped 15 yards across the lawn and through the weeds.This quickly became an experiment. I would put the green frog back in pond No. 1 and hewould move back to pond No. 2, which he saw as his pond.At first the transfer took one or two days. I never saw the frog make this trip. Withpractice he covered the route faster. Obviously he could find pond No. 2, which hecouldn’t see.I started raising pond No. 2 on a support of bricks and stones. My goal in thebeginning was to find out how high a pond’s edge had to be to admit the tree frogs andexclude green frogs.Green frogs aren’t made for climbing. Each time I would raise the level the tree frogswould move back.And then the green frog would somehow get back in. Every time the green frog got in andspawned, the tree frogs would give up and leave.Today the pond is set on pillars of stones at about 20 inches above the ground. And thegreen frog and his girlfriend are its only residents, along with their current crop oftadpoles.How do they get in? I wondered.So one Saturday morning I caught the green frog and carefully put him on the groundwhere I could watch him. Then I retreated to the deck with a cup of coffee to observe.After about two minutes, the green frog hopped toward the pond and disappeared into thesurrounding thicket. After several minutes’ rest, he began to clumsily climb the pile ofrocks.He struggled, fell back and tried again. About two-thirds of the way up, he took refugein a crevice for about 15 minutes. Then he reemerged to go up over the top and into hispond.He’s still there today, king of his little pond.Clearly this frog remembers where his pond is and can get in even though he can’t seethe water from the ground. I also found that the rockpile makes a structure with idealhiding places.I think I could exclude green frogs by making a smooth-sided barrier instead of therocks. But I’ve decided I like this intelligent frog.What can we learn from this? One idea is the concept of home range. Once established,most animals have an area they know. They learn its feeding and hiding places. Animalswith a known territory live much longer than those traveling through an unfamiliar place.If you’re making a backyard wildlife habitat, try making ponds. Several little oneswill increase the diversity of residents.Elevated ponds will favor certain kinds of frogs. Add structures like rockpiles toprovide hiding places. If you make the habitat good enough, your transients will establishthemselves and stay.last_img read more

‘Georgia Gardener.’

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first_imgUGA CAES File Photo Walter Reeves. On “Gardening in Georgia” this week, host Walter Reeves has a little something for almost every gardener: controlling weeds, preparing soils for planting, feeding and attracting birds to your yard and more.Reeves shows how to make a giant paintbrush to “paint” weeds out of your lawn without hurting your grass. All you need is a rake, an old towel, some string and a herbicide.A popular gardening show in its third season on Georgia Public Television, this week’s show includes a couple of recipes. One is for preparing soil for planting. The other is for cooking homemade suet for the birds. Reeves takes a look, too, at the eye-catching purple hyacinth bean.Besides all that, guest Wayne McLaurin lists the best cucumber varieties for your backyard garden. And Jim Midcap shows the Lenten rose (Helleborus orientalis), a 1999 Georgia Gold Medal Winner.Wednesdays, Saturdays on GPTV”Gardening in Georgia” airs on Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. and is rebroadcast on Saturdays at 12:30 p.m. on GPTV. The show is designed specifically for Georgia gardeners. It’s produced by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and GPTV.last_img read more

Precision teaching

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first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaYarbrough Consulting beat four other precision agriculture consulting firms to win a $100,000 contract from Pike Creek Turf, a major Southeastern turfgrass farm. Too bad they’ll never get to spend the money.Yarbrough and its competitors are all companies formed by students taking the “Principles of Precision Agriculture” class taught only on the University of Georgia Tifton campus.Fake firms, real grassSouthern Dawg Ag Consulting, Getting Mean in the Green, Big Dawg Consulting, BAJK Consulting and Yarbrough Consulting aren’t real companies. But Pike Creek Turf is very much a real and successful firm.The Cook County family operation, in south-central Georgia, is owned by the brother-sister team of Jaimie Allen and Kim Allen Boling. They manage 3,000 acres of 11 turfgrass varieties used mostly for golf courses. They employ 200 people.”They’re definitely one of the top turfgrass producers around,” said George Vellidis, a professor and engineer with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He teaches the class.Precision farmingThe class introduces students to precision agriculture, which helps farmers put things like water and fertilizers exactly where they need to be in exact amounts. That saves them money. It’s generally better for the environment, too.The students learn how Geographical Information Systems, a technology used to analyze data from a geographic perspective, and Global Positioning Systems, which uses satellites to locate pinpoints on Earth, can be used to auto-steer tractors or turfgrass mowers.They learn about remote sensing, too, using methods like satellite images to run variable-rate irrigation, which places water exactly as plants need it.For the final project, students were given the scenario that the Allens are interested in using precision agriculture on their farm and have decided to hire a consulting firm to make a plan for them.”I got a lot more out of this project than if I’d just read books,” said Gerome Morgan, a junior agriculture education major. He was on the Yarbrough team.”We were out there using the equipment,” he said, “and then really figuring out what would be best used and how for the Allens’ particular needs. Made it more interesting.””It puts the students in a real-life scenario,” Vellidis said, “and makes them apply what they have learned in the class.”The presentationEach team was required to submit a written, formal proposal to the Allens and Vellidis and give a 20-minute presentation.”The plans needed to be detailed enough for the Allens to really implement on their farm if they wanted,” Vellidis said.The students toured the Pike Creek Turf to prepare for the project. Just as it is in the real world, a slight information edge can be the difference between a big deal and the one that got away.During the farm visit, Yarbrough members noticed trucks hauling timber from the farm. After a few questions, they learned that the Allens also manage large tracts of timber land. Though the final project leaned toward turfgrass, the Yarbrough team included ways to improve timber lands, too, in their precision agriculture plan.That was the deciding factor.”All the teams made strong points,” Allen said. “We got some good ideas about some things we could implement in our operation.”This is the third year the class has been offered. Twenty-one students took the class this year. Students in previous classes made plans for a large vegetable farm and a grass-fed beef operation.The students probably won’t go on to work for a real precision ag consulting group, Vellidis said. But they’ll be entering the work force soon. Conducting research and organizing an effective presentation are both important skills in professional jobs.Yarbrough members weren’t sure how they would divide the big, fake, $100,000 check.last_img read more

Ag Forecast 2014

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first_imgThe 2014 Georgia Ag Forecast seminar series will be held Jan. 24-31 in Macon, Athens, Lyons, Tifton, Bainbridge and Cartersville. Registration for the series is open at www.georgiaagforecast.com “It helps farmers plan what they’re going to plant in the next year, but it’s also good for bankers and other businesspeople who do business with farmers or who will impacted by the farm economy.” Economists from the center and the UGA department of agriculture and applied economics will deliver the forecasts, which look at Georgia’s major commodities and the way that global markets, weather patterns and historical trends will affect them. “The main objective of the Ag Forecast is to provide Georgia’s producers and agribusiness leaders with information on where we think the industry is headed in the upcoming year,” said Kent Wolfe, director of the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. In addition to the annual Ag Forecast overview, attorney Will Thompson will speak on farm succession planning and offer advice for farmers and agribusiness owners on how to pass their businesses on to the next generation. Agriculture—the biggest industry in Georgia—has an impact that is felt throughout the state’s economy. In January, University of Georgia economists will break down the complicated web of factors that impact the state’s agriculture and give farmers and business leaders a preview of the 2014 growing season. The 2014 Ag Forecast sessions will be held Jan. 24 in Macon, Jan. 27 in Athens, Jan. 28 in Lyons, Jan. 29 in Tifton, Jan. 30 in Bainbridge and Jan. 31 in Cartersville. The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Georgia Farm Bureau and Georgia Department of Agriculture sponsor the annual seminar series, and its attendance grows every year. Last year, almost 1,000 business people, farmers and community leaders attended their local events. For more information on the 2014 Ag Forecast, see www.georgiaagforecast.com or follow @UGA_CollegeofAg on Twitter. ###last_img read more

Taste Bud Research

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first_imgMost people don’t give much thought to their 10,000 taste buds when they choose a chocolate chip cookie over an apple. University of College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researcher Hongxiang Liu thinks about these tiny sensory organs nearly every day. Liu, an assistant professor in the UGA Department of Animal and Dairy Science, has studied taste organs — the taste buds and taste papillae on which they reside — for more than 12 years to better understand the sense of taste and how it develops. She also plans to study the relationship between taste organs and obesity as a member of both the UGA Regenerative Medicine program and UGA Obesity Initiative. Researchers believe people’s ability to detect one of the basic tastes, such as sweet, could be related to the density of taste buds on their tongue. Under this assumption, a person with a greater density of taste buds would find a cookie sweeter than someone with a lower density of taste buds. “I think a better understanding of how taste papillae and taste buds are developed will help us to better understand how taste sensitivity is determined,” said Liu, who conducted research on taste at the University of Michigan before coming to UGA in September. Taste papillae are fingerlike projections visible on the tongue’s surface. Each papilla holds taste buds, which contain chemoreceptor cells. These cells send information about taste to the brain. Liu and her colleagues have identified several cell-signaling pathways, or sets of molecules involved in telling a cell what to do, that determine the pattern, density and size of taste papillae on the tongues of rats and mice. They also found the formation of the taste papillae can be altered by exposing the rodents’ tongues to different chemicals that affect these pathways. In a study published in Developmental Biology, Liu showed that one of the pathways involved in the development of taste papillae is the hedgehog-signaling pathway. The name refers to mutations in the pathway that cause taste buds of fruit flies — the organism in which it was originally discovered — to look spiky, resembling a hedgehog. “If I use a certain molecule to interrupt the hedgehog-signaling pathway at specific stages of development, the taste papillae will be everywhere on the rodent’s tongue,” said Liu, who was awarded a $1.25 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to further investigate the development of taste buds and taste papillae. She thinks the pathways involved in forming human papillae are similar to the ones she’s identified in rats and mice. A better understanding of these pathways and organs may provide a way to fight obesity. Cliff Baile, who directs UGA’s Obesity Initiative, hopes Liu can bring a new perspective to UGA researchers already studying eating behavior and food addiction. “As a taste developmental biologist, Liu brings a new area of research to the campus,” Baile said. Studying the way different foods or nutrients affect taste organ development could help researchers understand why the sense of taste differs among people. This knowledge also could help explain eating choices that lead to obesity. For example, people who are less able to detect the taste “sweet” might require more sugar to feel satisfied.last_img read more

Walk Georgia

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first_imgMore than 100 of Georgia’s county commissioners, officials and staff put on their walking shoes early Monday morning, April 14 for a Wellness Walk to encourage physical activity among Georgians. The event was sponsored by University of Georgia Extension’s Walk Georgia, The Coca-Cola Foundation, Association County Commissioners of Georgia (ACCG) and Local Government Risk Management Services, Inc., and was part of the annual ACCG conference, held last week in Savannah. “I love to exercise,” said Doug Derrer, Forsyth County Board of Commissioners county manager. “I thought it was a good idea to get this group to walk and exercise together.” Preston Little, of Walton County, whose father, Kevin Little, is chairman of the Walton County Board of Commissioners and incoming ACCG president, was the first to complete the Wellness Walk. The near two-mile walk started and ended on River Street. Commissioners received one continuing education credit for participating in the walk. Area 4-H’ers assisted at the event and applauded the commissioners and staff for setting the example of being physically active. “They’re leaders; if they can do it, we can do it,” said Anna Morris, an event volunteer from Chatham County 4-H. “They’re not just supporting people; they’re getting out there and doing what they’re supporting,” said Marci Delcampo, an event volunteer from Effingham County 4-H. Commissioners were given pedometers at the start of the conference to track their steps; prizes were doled out by ACCG based on who had the most steps by the end of the Wellness Walk. Wiley Grady, a Thomas County commissioner, won this award with more than 78,000 steps by the end of the walking event. Walk Georgia, run jointly by UGA Extension and the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences, is a free, web-based program that allows Georgians to track their physical activity online and virtually “walk” the state. The program also publishes a daily blog and weekly newsletter with recipes and information on varying wellness and nutrition topics, health-related apps and websites, and state parks. Through a $1 million, three-year gift from The Coca-Cola Foundation, Walk Georgia aims to reach 100,000 Georgians and decrease the number of physically inactive Georgians by 5 percent over the next few years. The spring session of Walk Georgia closes on April 26. For more information or to register, visit www.walkgeorgia.org. For more information on the UGA Obesity Initiative, see obesity.ovpr.uga.edu.last_img read more

SBA Proposes Legislation to Add $3 Billion to 7(a) Loan Program

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first_imgThe U.S. Small Business Administration announced a new legislative proposal that is expected to add at least $3 billion in lending authority to the 7(a) loan program this year. If enacted, the bill would allow the agency to increase lending authority by more than 30 percent, providing money for thousands more small loans in fiscal year 2004. The bill would also remove the current lending cap of $750,000, and allow loans up to $2 million.”This proposal builds on the success of the SBA Express program, and by significantly increasing 7(a) lending authority, will allow the SBA to reach out to tens of thousands more small business owners every year,” SBA Administrator Hector V. Barreto said. “The legislation provides more money for small business loans this year, at a time when the program is facing unprecedented demand.”By expanding the SBA Express program, which allows lenders to apply for 7(a) loans using their own forms and processes instead of lengthy and burdensome government forms, the entire 7(a) program would move to a lower guaranty rate of 50 percent. This reform would allow the agency to increase lending authority by over 30 percent. Based on FY 2003 numbers, that increase could have resulted in more than 22,000 additional loans to America’s entrepreneurs. If enacted for FY 2004, the lower guaranty rate and increased number of loans could provide capital to create as many as 500,000 new jobs.The proposed changes have the added benefit of moving the 7(a) program toward the goal of a permanent zero subsidy level. Preliminary data indicates that if this proposal is passed and signed into law, 7(a) could move to zero subsidy with fees that are below current congressionally mandated rates, making 7(a) loans even more attractive to small business owners and lenders.last_img read more

Governor, premier announce preliminary 26-year Vermont-Hydro-Québec agreement

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first_imgVermont s two largest utilities today signed a memorandum of understanding with provincial utility Hydro-Québec that sets the stage for a new power supply contract for Vermont customers. The 225-megawatt deal is comparable the current Hydro-Quebec contract and the initial cost will have little if any inflation, according to a utility source. Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas hailed the accord, which he said would be good for Vermont and Québec. Reaching a new long-term agreement with Hydro-Québec is a good deal for ratepayers and strengthens the state s economic future, Douglas said. This new contract will provide stable, clean, renewable power at a competitive price through 2038. Energy trade is the centerpiece of our longstanding and valued trading relationship with the Province of Quebec a relationship that Lt. Gov. Dubie and I have worked hard to strengthen over the past seven years. The agreement reached today is the result of many hours of hard work by my administration working in a collaborative fashion with CVPS and GMP. Québec and Vermont have an established relationship in multiple sectors. Today’s agreement is yet another example of this collaboration. Under this agreement Québec will continue to provide clean renewable electricity to Vermont. Today Québec strengthens its commercial ties with Vermont; together we continue to pursue the fight against climate change, said Jean Charest, Premier of Québec.Central Vermont Public Service and Green Mountain Power seek similar volumes to what they receive from Hydro-Québec today, and to make power available to other Vermont utilities.Under the MOU, the term sheet is confidential to protect market-sensitive information, but the companies announced that they anticipate purchases totaling up to about 225 megawatts starting in November 2012 and ending in 2038. The term sheet includes a price-smoothing mechanism that will shield customers from volatile market spikes over this period.Hydro-Quebec/Vermont Agreement Key Points March 11, 2010This agreement continues a decades-long relationship that has been good for Vermont and Quebec. It will provide a substantial block of energy to Vermont, roughly approximating current purchases from Hydro-Quebec, filling a large piece of the state s impending energy gap. Based on our market evaluation, we expect the starting price will be comparable to our existing HQ contract. It s a very good deal for Vermont.The agreement announced today is the result of extensive, collaborative efforts involving Hydro-Quebec, Premier Jean Charest, Governor Jim Douglas, Central Vermont Public Service and Green Mountain Power.The MOU sets the stage for a new 26-year contract, starting in 2012 and ending in 2038, which will provide the next generation of Vermonters with clean, sustainable, affordable energy from Hydro-Quebec and will help Vermont maintain its low-carbon power supply.The purchase agreement will provide precisely the type of energy Vermonters and policymakers have said they want: clean, low-emission energy with relative price stability.The agreement will tie future energy prices to a series of market indexes and should provide significant price stability at very competitive rates. It will offer Vermont ratepayers significant protection from high energy price spikes, and will protect Hydro-Quebec from very low price swings.The Vermont Legislature can add to the value of the deal by passing legislation that defines large hydro-electric production, including Hydro-Quebec s energy, as renewable energy. If such legislation is enacted, any renewable energy certificate revenue from power delivered over the Highgate Interconnection, up to 225 MW per hour, will be shared 50-50 between the parties, and the Vermont utilities share will benefit their customers.This is a sizable purchase of scheduled energy, available during the key 16 hours of every day, 365 days per year. To put it in perspective, Vermont s typical load is around 700 megawatts, with a peak of about 1,000 megawatts. The contract will provide up to 225 megawatts.Under the MOU, final terms and conditions should be ironed out over the next few months, with a filing at the Vermont Public Service Board expected by August. The resulting contract will require PSB approval.  This agreement sets the stage for a new contract that will help us maintain what is arguably the cleanest power supply in the nation, while ensuring a relatively stable and affordable future for our customers, CVPS President Bob Young and GMP President Mary Powell said in a joint statement. It continues a relationship that has helped us provide competitive rates in the northeast, with minimal air and greenhouse impacts. This is an enormous step forward as we continue to plan Vermont s energy future. This agreement is the natural extension of a business relationship that has benefited both Hydro-Québec and our Vermont customers, said Thierry Vandal, President and Chief Executive Officer of Hydro-Québec. It will allow us to optimize our exports of clean renewable electricity, and Vermonters will continue to benefit from a reliable energy source at a stable and competitive price.Under the accord, announced at a meeting with Premier Charest and Gov. Douglas, CVPS, GMP and Hydro-Québec will negotiate final terms of the agreement over the next few months. The final 26-year agreement is expected to provide broad, scheduled energy delivery at a good value for customers. The market is extremely volatile, with tremendous highs and lows, the companies said. The contract will tend to keep Vermont s purchases near the middle of the market, protecting Vermont consumers from the highest price swings and Hydro-Québec from the lowest price swings.Young said the memorandum of understanding will help secure a major segment of CVPS s power supply as existing contracts with Hydro-Québec and Vermont Yankee come to a close starting in 2012. Hydro-Québec s clean, sustainable hydroelectric projects and relative price stability provide exactly the kind of power Vermonters have told us they would like, Young said. We have always provided an energy mix with very low emissions, and this agreement will help us ensure that tradition for the next generation of our customers.Powell said: A major component of our energy strategy, launched two years ago, was to pursue a broader, more strategic partnership with Hydro-Québec in order to benefit from its highly reliable, very low-carbon power system. Our agreement today is a major step in that direction and also ensures significant economic value for Vermont consumers.Vermont and Québec have had an energy partnership for a very long time. Energy trading between Vermont and Québec has been an important component of Vermont s energy supply since the early 1980s, when longer-term power deals were inaugurated. The current Vermont-Hydro-Québec contract, which was signed on Dec. 4, 1987, expires in 2016.One of the key provisions of the agreement is for the Vermont General Assembly to enact legislation to designate large hydro, which would include Hydro-Québec power, as renewable. Any renewable energy credit revenues for HQ power delivered over the Highgate Interconnection would be shared between the Vermont companies, benefiting their customers, and Hydro-Québec.The accord was signed by CVPS (NYSE-CV), GMP and H.Q. Energy Services (U.S.) Inc., an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Hydro-Québec. It commits the parties to negotiate in good faith a power purchase agreement based on the non-binding term sheet. According to the memorandum, the parties intend to negotiate the material terms of the power purchase agreement no later than June 30, 2010 to allow the parties to obtain all necessary internal organizational approvals and execute the agreement no later than July 31, 2010. The final agreement will be subject to Vermont Public Service Board approval and certain other conditions.The binding terms of a power purchase agreement will be established only upon execution of a contract acceptable to each party. Should execution of the agreement by all parties fail to occur for any reason prior to July 31, 2010, the memorandum of understanding and the obligations of the parties to negotiate a final agreement will terminate.Source: Governor’s office. Québec, March 11, 2010 – -30-last_img read more

Vermont ranks second in stimulus-related job growth

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first_imgVermont has had the second highest success in the nation in creating new jobs with federal stimulus funds. It also ranks 12th in stimulus-related funding per capita. Meanwhile, in a new analysis conducted by Onvia, the leader in gBusiness solutions and the creator of Recovery.org, reveals that the “Recovery Summer” being promoted by the White House is poised to usher in a wave of new jobs in the second half of this year.For a complete look at the heat map visit:http://promotions.onvia.com/documents/map_arra_private_sector_jobs_impac(link is external)…To date, only one-third of the Recovery Act’s $275 billion that is allocated for projects to create private sector jobs on Main Street has been awarded. The remaining $218 billion represents a substantial amount of new projects that are about to get under way across the U.S.Top line findings:714,589 private sector jobs have been supported nationwide by Recovery Act project spending since its passage. These do not include public sector jobs created by stimulus grants to states and those paid by the government. Recovery Act project spending in 2010 is expected to generate a 27 percent increase in this figure by the end of 2010.$57.5 billion has been awarded to private sector contractors to fulfill Recovery Act projects, just one-third of the $275 billion allocated for private sector projects.Arkansas, North Carolina, Colorado, Maryland and Pennsylvania are the top five states for ARRA project per capita spending-to-date. Wisconsin, Illinois, Tennessee, Nevada and Utah are the bottom five states.North Carolina, Vermont, Illinois, and Nevada are projected to be the top five states for private sector job creation resulting from ARRA project contract awards in the remainder of 2010. Maryland, Wyoming, Alabama, Alaska and Oregon are projected to be the bottom five states.These findings were derived from Onvia’s data through August 11, 2010 – approximately 18 months since the stimulus money began flowing into the states. For a complete look at the heat map and report please visit: http://promotions.onvia.com/documents/Recovery_Summer_Update_by_Onvia.pd(link is external)…”Onvia’s analysis shows that while job creation since the Recovery Act’s passage has been slow to take hold on Main Street, job creation in the remainder of 2010 is expected to turn around with lagging states seeing an increase of 50 to 100 percent or more in private sector job creation,” said Michael Balsam, Onvia chief strategy officer. “The best way for businesses to accelerate job growth in their states is to become part of the gBusiness marketplace, take part in the bid process, prepare for a wave of contract awards and follow these projects all the way through completion.As of August 11th, 2010, Onvia was tracking roughly 72,000 Recovery Act projects valued at $150 billion, of which 24,500 projects totaling $57 billion had been awarded to contractors.About OnviaFor more than 12 years Onvia (Nasdaq: ONVI), the gBusiness Innovator, has been successfully delivering the research, analytics and tools required for companies to succeed at the intersection of business and government, or gBusiness, market. Onvia tracks, analyzes and reports the spending of more than 89,000 federal, state and local government agencies, giving companies a single source for conducting open, intelligent and efficient business with government. Along with providing an exclusive suite of integrated business tools, Onvia is also the creator of Recovery.org, a website that tracks economic recovery-funded projects, and DemandStar, the automated system that streamlines agency procurement processes. For information about Onvia visit www.onvia.com(link is external).SOURCE Onvia.com, Inc. SEATTLE/PRNewswire-FirstCall/ — 8.17.2010last_img read more