Category: ouruvrkm

BoMD grows

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first_imgThe Bank of Mum and Dad (BoMD) is now a £5bn UK mortgage lender and will be involved in 25 per cent of all UK property purchases in 2016.Legal & General, the FTSE100 financial services group and Cebr, the economics consultancy, have published a new report into the role play in helping their children get on, or move up the property ladder. The research shows the Bank of Mum and Dad will lend over £5 billion, providing deposits for over 300,000 mortgages, purchasing homes worth £77 billion in 2016. The Bank of Mum and Dad is the equivalent of a top 10 mortgage lender in the UK and will be involved in 25 per cent of all property transactions that take place in the UK market this year.Nigel Wilson, CEO of Legal & General, said, “The Bank of Mum and Dad plays an increasingly vital role in helping young people take their early steps on the housing ladder.”mortgage news Bank of Mum & Dad BoMD finance news June 12, 2016The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » BoMD grows previous nextProducts & ServicesBoMD growsThe Negotiator12th June 20160570 Viewslast_img read more

Assistant Professor – Pulmonary

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first_imgSummaryThe Department of Pediatrics, Pulmonology Section is seeking aqualified candidate to provide quality patient care at TexasChildren’s Hospital. Must be board certified in Pediatrics andboard eligible/certified in Pediatric Pulmonology. Some of theprofessional responsibilities include Baylor College of Medicine is an Equal Opportunity/AffirmativeAction/Equal Access Employer.5280CA; CH Providing the highest standard of comprehensive clinical careto pulmonary patients in the ICUs and pulmonary hypertensionpatientsFostering public awareness of diseases and disorders of thepulmonary/respiratory system and their causes.Promoting health and prevention of diseases of thepulmonary/respiratory system.last_img

Chair, Biological Sciences – College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (6750)

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first_imgPosition Description SummaryNorthern Illinois University ( NIU ) invites applications for theposition of Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences ( BIOS )(https://www.niu.edu/clas/biology/index.shtml). This is a 12-monthtenured position with rank of associate or full professor to beginJuly 1, 2021.We seek a Chair that is a strong communicator and will providestrategic, academic, and administrative leadership to distinguishthe department in its research, teaching and service missions. Thesuccessful candidate will (1) promote excellence in undergraduateand graduate education and research and recruitment and retentionof excellent students, (2) build bridges between departmentalresearch emphases and other disciplines, departments, andinstitutions and (3) foster a transformation in faculty and staffdevelopment and composition to better serve an increasingly diversecommunity.NIU is a public research university located in DeKalb, Illinois, anexurb of Chicago. Our 16,000+ student body is diverse, with manyfirst-generation and minority students. NIU prides itself onstudent-centered approaches to teaching and research, and hassocial mobility, equity, and inclusion at the heart of its mission.Biological Sciences is one of the largest majors on campus and ourdepartment has faculty and students pursuing dynamic researchagendas including biomedical, microbial, pedagogical,developmental, evolutionary and ecological questions utilizingnearby, world-class resources like Nachusa Grasslands, The NatureConservancy, Fermi National Accelerator Lab, Argonne National Laband the Chicago Proton Center. DeKalb is now home to the newFacebook strategic interconnected data center that uses localaccess to cloud on-ramps and surrounding energy grids. Theproximity of DeKalb to Chicago provides easy access to Chicago’sresearch and technology corridor, the arts and extensive naturepreserves and parks. The Department of Biological Sciences ishoused primarily in Montgomery Hall, a 112,000-square-footfacility. In addition to teaching and research laboratories, thedepartment maintains live animal facilities, greenhouses, confocaland electron microscopy, and molecular core services (nucleic acidsequencing and qPCR).Required QualificationsPh.D. in the Biological Sciences, a history of excellence inteaching and research, relevant leadership, management andadministrative experience, and a demonstrated commitment todiversity, equity, and inclusion.Preferred QualificationsThe field of specialization is open but should complementdepartmental strengths in molecular, cellular, and organismalbiology.Hiring Rate/RangeNegotiatedWorking HoursPosting Date12/04/2020Closing DatePriority Review Date01/31/2021Special Instructions to ApplicantsApplications must include a (1) letter of interest, outlining thecandidate’s leadership and management experience, motivation, andqualifications for the position (2-3 pages); (2) a vision statementincluding research, teaching and fostering diversity, equity, andinclusion (3 page maximum); and (3) a current curriculum vitae withthe names and contact information for three professionalreferences. Review will commence for completed applicationsreceived by January 31, 2021, but applications will be accepteduntil the position is filled. NIU values diversity in its faculty,staff and student body. In keeping with this commitment, ouracademic community strongly encourages applications from diversecandidates and candidates who support diversity. Questions may besent via email to the chair of the search committee, Dr. LindaYasui at [email protected] to Department Homepagehttps://www.niu.edu/clas/biology/index.shtmlPhysical DemandsBackground Check RequiredYesEEO StatementIn accordance with applicable statutes and regulations, NIU is anequal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basisof race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, religion, age,physical and mental disability, marital status, veteran status,sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, politicalaffiliation, or any other factor unrelated to professionalqualifications, and will comply with all applicable federal andstate statutes, regulations and orders pertaining tonondiscrimination, equal opportunity and affirmative action.The following person has been designated to handle inquiriesregarding the non-discrimination policies:Ethics and Compliance Officer, Title IX CoordinatorHealth Services [email protected] PolicyIn compliance with federal law, all persons hired will be requiredto verify identity and eligibility to work in the United States andto complete the required employment eligibility verificationdocument form upon hire.ADA AccommodationNIU remains committed to ensuring that its recruitment andapplication procedures include full opportunities for applicantswith disabilities. Employment opportunities will not be denied toanyone because of the need to make accommodations for a person’sdisability during either the application or interview process. Anapplicant who believes they require an accommodation to participatein the employment process due to a disability may request thataccommodation through the Accommodation Request Form . For further assistance,please contact the office of Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunityand Education ( AAEOE ) at [email protected] .Clery Act InformationNIU provides information regarding campus security, personal andfire safety, including topics such as: crime prevention, emergencyresponse procedures and crime reporting policies, in addition tocrime and fire statistics for the most recent three calendar years.The Annual Security Report containing security and safetyinformation is available at www.safety.niu.edu/clery or bycontacting the University Police Department and Public SafetyDepartment at 815-753-9628 to receive a hard copy. The Annual FireSafety Report is available at www.niu.edu/clery/fire_report.pdf orby contacting the Environmental Health and Safety Department at815-753-0404 to receive a hard copy.Quick Linkhttps://employment.niu.edu/postings/54555Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*).Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsResume/Curriculum VitaeCover LetterStatement of Research VisionList of at least 3 ReferencesOptional Documentslast_img read more

Indiana Conservation Officers Enter A New Dimension Of Search And Rescue

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first_imgIndiana Conservation Officers Enter A New Dimension Of Search And RescueIndiana Conservation Officers have added Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (SUAS) to their search and rescue capabilities.  The DNR Law Enforcement Division is the first state emergency response agency to receive official endorsement to utilize these devices for the purpose of search and rescue operations.“The SUAS machines will greatly enhance our ability to bring quick resolve in finding lost children, hikers, hunters, outdoor enthusiasts and injured people”, said Captain Keith Dinn, Support Services Assistant Commander.  “The training and expertise our certified pilots have received gives me confidence that our officers and other emergency responding agencies will have a much higher rate of success  in locating citizens in need with a much quicker response time.”Currently, five Indiana Conservation Officers have become certified pilots of the SUAS machines and will be prepared for statewide response.   The DNR Law Enforcement Division has two SUAS units with future goals of adding more to the fleet.Along with the ability to locate lost citizens, the SUAS will map out the obstacles for the emergency response personnel and provide knowledge of dangers before encountering the obstacle.“I could not be more proud of our agency as we make this innovative and futuristic step forward to enhance our search and rescue response capabilities to reach our citizens in need”, stated Danny L. East, DNR Law Enforcement Director.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Rep. Walorski votes against $3-trillion package due to items unrelated to coronavirus relief

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first_img Facebook Twitter By 95.3 MNC – May 16, 2020 0 349 CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews WhatsApp Google+ Previous articleBerrien County officials clearing up some Executive Order confusionNext articleCase of COVID-19 reported at St. Joseph County DuComb Center 95.3 MNCNews/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel is your breaking news and weather station for northern Indiana and southwestern Michigan. Google+ Pinterest Rep. Walorski votes against $3-trillion package due to items unrelated to coronavirus relief WhatsApp (“U.S. Capitol Building detail” by Kevin Burkett, Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic) U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski released the following statement after voting against Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s $3 trillion bill that includes a federal bailout of fiscally irresponsible states, a tax cut for millionaires and billionaires, and other progressive priorities unrelated to coronavirus relief or economic recovery efforts:“As American families, workers, farmers, and small business owners face the worst health and economic crisis in our lifetimes, Speaker Pelosi can only see political opportunity.“This $3 trillion left-wing wish list has nothing to do with fighting coronavirus, providing relief to those who need it, or safely reopening our economy. Instead it provides a bailout for fiscally irresponsible states and a giveaway for millionaires and billionaires – and sticks hardworking Americans with the bill. It imposes one-size-fits-all mandates on small businesses and makes it harder for them to rehire, recover, and rebuild. And it does not include pro-life protections, opening the door to taxpayer-funded abortion and a Planned Parenthood bailout.“Despite bipartisan opposition, Speaker Pelosi once again gave in to her radical base for a bill that has no chance of becoming law. It’s time for Congress to start focusing on what matters: protecting the health and safety of the American people, getting businesses and employees safely back to work, and holding China accountable.”The bill is expected to go nowhere in the U.S. Senate.BACKGROUNDH.R. 6800, which passed the House by a vote of 208 to 199, would:Provide taxpayer-funded bailouts of $915 billion for state and local governments and $25 billion bailout for the U.S. Postal Service;Give millionaires and billionaires in high-tax states a tax break by repealing the state and local tax deduction cap for two years;Remove pro-life protections from the Paycheck Protection Program and other funding, allowing for taxpayer-funded abortion;Allow illegal immigrants to receive direct payments by removing Social Security number verification;Impose one-size-fits-all OSHA and paid leave mandates on all businesses;Permanently disallow rulemaking pertaining to work requirements for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP);Extend unemployment insurance enhancements into 2021, including paying some workers more in unemployment benefits than they would earn returning to work; andForce a federal takeover of elections with strict regulations on states with regard to early voting, voter ID requirements, same-day registration, and vote-by-mail. Twitter Pinterest Facebooklast_img read more

Macphie triumphs at Interface Excellence Awards

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first_imgScottish food ingredients manufacturer Macphie of Glenbervie has won two awards at the Interface Excellence Awards 2013.Held at the Assembly Rooms in Edinburgh on 21 November, the business was presented with the Sustained Partnership of The Year award and the Outstanding Contribution to Knowledge Exchange Award.Ashley Baker, head of research and development at Macphie collected the Outstanding Contribution Award for his commitment to academic and business knowledge exchange, after being nominated by Iain MacEwen of Herriott Watt University. The awards recognise the success and achievement resulting from collaborative partnerships between business and academia.Over the past two years Macphie has carried out 15 collaborative research projects with Scottish universities. These have ranged from short-term projects to address specific business challenges to larger, longer-term ‘blue sky’ research and development collaborations.Alastair Macphie, Macphie chief executive, said: “We’re delighted to receive recognition for our continued commitment to build close relationships and investment in a collaborative approach with academia to deliver real innovation in all areas of product development, process improvement and wider food science, which we see as a critical to the long-term success of the business.”With production facilities at Glenbervieand Tannochside, Glasgow, and a turnover of £42m, the company produces a variety of ambient mixes and concentrates, glazes, dairy cream alternatives and icings, as well as frozen and chilled soups, butters and sauces for the bakery, foodservice and food manufacturing sectors.last_img read more

The ending as beginning: Commencement ’18

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first_imgHarvard’s annual Commencement is both a conclusion and a start for those graduating. But the day also is a gathering of the far-flung Crimson clan under tents and trees in a party atmosphere. Below are snippets from the festive day from start to finish, with the most recent moments at the top, presented as snapshots of the 367th Commencement.Sunrise on life after graduationThe most memorable Commencement week moment for Govind Bindra ’18 was not when he received the diploma that he held proudly in his hands at Mather House ceremonies. It came when he watched the sun rise three days earlier with the people he feels closest to, his roommates.“We have been together and stayed together since freshman year,” Bindra said. “The friendships I have with them, these are the kinds of friendships I intend to keep for a lifetime.”He came to Harvard from Tennessee to study chemistry, but what he learned was that people are what makes an experience.“Despite what I learned developing my major, the most significant thing Harvard has taught me is that it’s the diversity of people and sharing this experience with them that is profound,” he said.And he’ll take that spirit to look ahead.“I’ve decided for myself I’m not going to leave my best years here,” he said. “We are moving on now, and I can’t wait to see where our paths take us.”— Deborah Blackwell,‘Your next step is up to you’When Claudette Taylor came to the United States from Jamaica more than three decades ago, she never dreamed that her grandson would become a Harvard College graduate. But she stood proudly by Razaak Eniola Jr. ’18 Thursday, as he talked about how his grandmother has always inspired him.“Knowing where my family has come from, knowing their stories, knowing their sacrifices to bring me where I am today, I’m really happy and really proud,” he said.Taylor arrived alone to New York City and earned money by cleaning floors, working hard to follow her dream.“I got my green card, went to school, became a medical assistant, and started working in a hospital,” she said. “Years after that believe it or not, I went on and got my master’s in health care management and health services administration. Then I started teaching as a professor at Long Island University. This is a real immigrant story.”Although Eniola concentrated in the history of science and mastered Chinese, his path may also lead him toward health care. He’s surrounded by family in that field. Eniola’s father practices internal medicine near their home in Salisbury, Md., his aunt is a nurse, her husband is a doctor, and an uncle is an X-ray technician.While Eniola is considering pre-med with a focus in health care policy for his postgraduate work, his grandmother had her own words of wisdom for him on his special day.“Do something in the medical field, because there will always be sick people,” she said. “But I’m just so proud of you, so happy, and your next step is up to you.”— Deborah Blackwell,An end, yes, or maybe a beginningWhen Darlington Nwaudo ’18 first saw his diploma after exiting the podium during Kirkland House’s afternoon Commencement ceremonies, he could not decide if graduating from Harvard is an ending or a beginning.“I am so excited and feel that it’s crazy that it all comes to an end right now, and everything that I’ve been working for the last four years is here in this diploma,” he said.But his parents weren’t concerned. Originally from Nigeria, they felt nothing but excitement that their son had received his degree in molecular and cellular biology. He hopes to become a surgeon.“After four years, he is standing here with his diploma,” said Jane Nwaudo, Darlington’s mother. “It’s just amazing.” She is excited that her son will be moving closer to their home in St. Paul, Minn., to attend medical school at the University of Chicago. “It’s driving distance,” she said.After a few minutes, Nwaudo decided his diploma represented much more than just an ending or a beginning.“I’m so thankful for this opportunity, to be able even to study here, to have all the incredible faculty, the incredible experience,” he said. “I just feel so lucky.”— Deborah Blackwell,With staff and top hat, the sheriff’s viewThere are lots of longstanding Commencement traditions at Harvard, but few are as dramatic — or as boisterous — as the one that Peter Koutoujian M.C./M.P.A. ’03, gets to lead every year.As Middlesex County sheriff, he heads the morning processional of University presidents past and present (and this year a president-elect), followed by members of the Corporation, the provost, and Overseers, through the Old Yard and into Tercentenary Theatre.Then, after a solemn walk across the stage, Koutoujian obliges the provost’s ritual command to “Pray, give us order.” Wearing a top hat, the sheriff pounds a silver-topped staff three times on the granite steps, and with a “Let’s get ready to rumble!” style gusto faces the crowd and delivers the precious words that students and their proud families have longed to hear at graduation:“As the high sheriff of Middlesex County, I declare that the meeting will be in or-duhhhh!” “Everyone enjoys that moment so much,” said Koutoujian of his let-it-rip emphasis on order, using a British-ish accent that he calls “channeling my inner John Harvard.”“It’s incumbent upon the sheriff to set the tone for the entire Commencement,” he said.,A former state representative, Koutoujian first attended Commencement when he earned a mid-career master’s degree from Harvard Kennedy School in 2003.“I don’t really remember much of that day because I was just overwhelmed” by all that was going on, he confessed.But since Gov. Deval Patrick appointed him sheriff in 2011, he has been able to relive Commencement again and again, from the stage.“Now, I get to enjoy that day in a way that I appreciate completely differently, and wish I had appreciated more as a student.”Though the sheriff’s role, which dates to the 17th century, is mainly ceremonial, it wasn’t always that way.“At one point, these graduations were quite celebratory, meaning that it wasn’t even just the students, alumni, and families that would attend the graduations, but the public would attend because there weren’t many opportunities to have local festivities,” Koutoujian said. “So they’d really get out of hand, and they’d need the sheriff to maintain order. That’s how it started, and that’s why I’m asked to give order.”Even today, two to three dozen county deputy sheriffs and officers work in tandem with Harvard and Cambridge police during Commencement, he noted.Then there was that one time in 2013 when real life intervened, and order was called for.Koutoujian said he was making his way back from the Kennedy School’s graduation event and came upon a man assaulting a woman in the middle of Harvard Square as stunned bystanders looked on in horror. Still dressed in his top hat and tails and without a weapon or handcuffs, the 6-foot, 6-inch sheriff (that’s before the hat) confronted the man and, using his loudest Commencement voice, ordered him to stop.“And it worked!” said Koutoujian.So far, there haven’t been any Commencement disasters like forgetting his lines or breaking the staff. In fact, there have only been memorable moments of the best kind, like getting complimented by Aretha Franklin, or getting a hug from Oprah Winfrey. One treasured memento is a photo of 2017 honorand James Earl Jones clapping his hands and laughing joyously as Koutoujian opened the Morning Exercises.“One of the great voices of our time, celebrating my announcement!” he said in disbelief.Still, Koutoujian is careful to stick with the script and not get carried away with his yearly 15 seconds of fame.“The event itself is much more important than the people who are participating in it. So when you’re mindful of that, that you’re really just playing a role in an historic event, you understand it’s not about you at all, it’s about Harvard University.”— Christina Pazzanese,Making good on her goalStanding outside Winthrop House, Queen Lane reminisced about her daughter Jaina’s dreams of coming to Harvard.“She used to tell people she wanted to go to Harvard, and people would say, ‘Yeah, sure.’ She did it. It’s a dream come true for her.”A chemical and physical biology concentrator with a secondary in Global Health, Jaina will attend medical school at the University of Virginia in the fall. She plans to become a pediatric reconstructive surgeon, a career she chose in middle school after learning about Operation Smile, an international nonprofit that repairs children’s cleft lips and cleft palates.For Jaina, saying farewell to Harvard, a moment that had come on fast, could wait just a little longer.“It hasn’t hit yet,” Jaina said. “Maybe when I go home, it’ll hit me and I’ll realize I had graduated. For now, I’ll enjoy my last night at Harvard.”— Liz Mineo,Flowers for graduates, opportunity for vendorFor the past 25 years, Commencement Day has been a special time for David Greenberg. Greenberg is among a handful of flower sellers who set up shop near Harvard’s gates with carts of colorful bouquets.Presenting flowers to graduates and parents alike remains a popular tradition, said Greenberg, a Worcester resident who also sells graduation bouquets at Boston College and Boston University.For Harvard’s Commencement, Greenberg gets up at 4:30 a.m. to drive in from Worcester to find early parking on Massachusetts Avenue not far from Johnston Gate. His cart is filled with roses, spider mums, lilies, alstroemerias, carnations, and chrysanthemums. The most popular bouquet, a mix of roses and lilies, sells for $25. Greenberg said he does a brisk business at Commencement, selling between 100 and 150 bouquets, and he makes sure he never runs out of flowers.And in the best American capitalist tradition, when it rains, he sells umbrellas. At last year’s Commencement, held amid a pounding rainstorm, he sold nearly 100 of them.Greenberg said he enjoys being part of the festive atmosphere. and he welcomes the chance to trade his wares for joy. “I can’t tell you how much I make, but Harvard should let me sell flowers inside and get a percentage,” he said, showing that, as an astute businessman, he’s still thinking ahead.— Liz Mineo,Determined learnerBonnie Seymour’s road to Commencement was longer than most. Not in terms of miles, since the journeys of parents from around the world beat her commute from Rhode Island. But Seymour’s trip was a different kind of long, starting in the fourth grade, when she could neither read nor do simple mathematics.“It was difficult, I would shove my work in to the desk so no one would know,” she said.Seymour, graduating with a master’s in museum studies from the Extension School, was diagnosed with a learning disability and, luckily, received guidance from people who were able to puzzle out how she learned best. Her reading and math skills improved right away, and she would go on to earn a bachelor’s degree from the University of Rhode Island.“I am excited, this is kind of a big deal,” said Seymour, making her way into Tercentenary Theatre. “When I was younger, it was discovered I had a learning disability and they told me I probably wouldn’t make it to college. Now I’m getting a master’s. Ha! Ha!”— Alvin PowellGSD students take flightIt’s a Commencement tradition that soon-to-be-grads from the different Schools carry props into Tercentenary Theatre to signify their discipline. Some are obvious — like the inflatable globes waved by Kennedy School students or the children’s books by Ed School grads — and some less so.This year, students from the Graduate School of Design hung their hats with Legos, signifying the crucial role of design in building. Students in the master of design studies program had included small bird’s nests next to the Legos.Class Marshal Charles Newman explained that the nests represented migration, referencing to the students’ broad-based discipline, which required studies at various Schools.“This symbolizes our seasonal, if not daily, migration to different desks,” Newman said. “We would set up shop in one School and then move to the next.”— Alvin Powell,At Mass Hall, it’s about the hatsKatie Tiger is not sure who started the tradition, but she has embraced the Commencement Day custom of Mass Hall staffers donning impressive hats.“When I first started here almost seven years ago, someone said to me, ‘Oh, everybody wears hats in Mass Hall on Commencement Day,’ ” said Tiger, an executive assistant to President Drew Faust. “I got very excited and started hat shopping with my colleague, who was the provost’s assistant at the time,” and she convinced others who hadn’t been aware of the tradition to get aboard.Now, every April, Tiger organizes an office shopping trip to Salmagundi, a specialty hat shop in Boston. At least half a dozen colleagues join in the fun, trying on many hats, critiquing each other’s choices, and over time developing a millinery collection. (Cha Cha’s House of Ill Repute in New York is also a Tiger favorite.)The staffers spend most of the day in Mass Hall, ground zero on Commencement Day, in a constant swirl of activity, as they greet University officials, guests, alumni, and VIPs who are their own ceremonial hats and robes. The staffers don’t have their own official Commencement garb to wear, so donning their hats makes them feel festive and part of the day.,“When I put the hat on, it’s just about being part of the ceremonies and being into it,” said Theresa Lungu, the reception and correspondence coordinator at Mass Hall. “It’s like, ‘Ooh, it feels like I’m graduating!’ ”Lungu was new to Harvard last spring when the annual hat-shopping call went out. She eagerly got on board and found the camaraderie irresistible. “I was new, so to be included, for me, was — I really felt at home. OK, I’m part of Mass Hall. It was really great,” said Lungu.Being in Harvard Yard, sharing in the rich pageantry and the spirit of the celebration, is fun.“It’s such a special day for the entire community here, so it’s nice to be part of it and celebrate with them,” said Tiger. “Whoever started this tradition, I thank them, because it’s a great idea.”— Christina Pazzanese,At Kennedy School, wishes for futureAfter the Morning Exercises in the Yard, newly minted graduates of the Harvard Kennedy School headed to JFK Memorial Park for their own festivities under a giant tent.Archon Fung, academic dean and Winthrop Laflin McCormack Professor of Citizenship and Self-Government, told the graduates during his introductory remarks that “It is up to you to invent new ways forward because many of the old ways have lost their purchase.” Fung emphasized the importance of “lifting every voice” and leading by example. “The world desperately needs your creativity.”Dean Douglas Elmendorf then urged the graduates to “stand up for knowledge and against ignorance and fabrication,” echoing Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Class Day remarks the day before. He called for the graduates to exhibit integrity and courage, and even to “sit down” when necessary, to listen to others’ perspectives, especially when those perspectives provoke disagreement and thoughtfulness.— Katie Gibson,Some fond — and noisy — farewellsCommencement is one of the rare moments when the deans of all the Schools and faculties are in one place at one time. As such, it’s a fitting occasion for final farewells to outgoing leaders.This year, Provost Alan Garber bid farewell to Michael Smith, Edgerly Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, for “11 years of distinguished leadership.” (Smith is returning to teaching.)He also thanked Dean James Ryan, who is departing Harvard to take up the presidency of the University of Virginia, for his four years of service at the Graduate School of Education.Ryan received the most raucous sendoff, since several GSE grads had brought vuvuzelas to the ceremonies. After the wild rumpus subsided, it was perhaps appropriate that the dean introduced this year’s graduates by reading from Maurice Sendak’s “Where the Wild Things Are.”— Alvin Powell,A few laughs with that degreeThe conferring of honorary degrees, during which Provost Alan Garber introduces each recipient to President Drew Faust with a sometimes humorous preamble, is an important part of  Commencement. This year, seven degrees were awarded, including one to Harvey Fineberg, whose career has included stints as dean of the Harvard School of Public Health and president of the Institute of Medicine. He also held a position near and dear to Garber’s heart.“In 1997,” Garber said, “he was named to what many regard as the single most exalted academic leadership position in all of higher education. I refer of course, to the role of Harvard University provost.”Faust later piled on the humor, solemnly intoning as she conferred Fineberg’s Doctor of Laws, “Dexterous herder of Crimson cats, superlative exponent of human health, caring leader with a common touch. His given name is Harvey, but to us he’s always Harvard.”— Alvin Powell,Where next? Wherever the RV takes usMorgan Barraza can confidently claim to be unique in how she’ll celebrate her degree. Barraza, who received a master’s in education learning and teaching, will take a recreational vehicle first to her wedding and then back home to the Salt River Pima Reservation in Arizona, stopping to see friends along the way.Barraza, a Native American and member of the Salt River Pima, said that commencement ceremonies were extra special because several family members, including her grandmother, who was in the hospital for when she received her undergraduate degree from Columbia, were able to attend.“For her to be able to come here and see me, it’s a huge privilege, not only to our families but also to our particular communities,” Barraza said. “I want to return to my community and continue teaching.”— Alvin PowellSinging in the old and newMusic has been an integral part of Commencement for generations, as it was today at Tercentenary Theatre. In keeping with tradition, the Commencement Choir performed a version of Psalm 78 set to music by the 18th-century composer William Tans’ur. The piece has been part of Commencement since its inception. But the choir also made room for the new.“We are … sisters of mercy, brothers of love, lovers of life, the builders of nations,” reads one of the refrains in the composition “We Are …”  by Ysayë Maria Barnwell, a former member of the a cappella group Sweet Honey and the Rock. (The piece was a fitting choice, having also been performed at freshman convocation for the Class of 2018.)The song was not only a stylistic departure from other works in the Commencement program, said Director of Choral Activities Andrew Clark, who leads the Commencement Choir, but also a reflection of “the Harvard of today.”“This particular song really speaks powerfully to the continuum of inheriting the wonderful traditions and values and identities from our ancestors and those who came before us, but also projecting and putting forth our own hopes and aspirations for the future,” he said.“It was a piece that President Faust enjoyed as well,” Clark added. “So given her last Commencement with us, we thought we would perform it.”— Colleen WalshMaking his parents proudFor the parents of graduating senior Guillermo Gomez, the celebration was full of tradition and pomp, but also dreams and promise.A native of Fort Worth, Texas, Gomez grew up one of four siblings in a working-class family. His parents Salvador and Francisca Gomez immigrated from Mexico in 1995 seeking better opportunities.Salvador, a construction worker, and Francisca, a housekeeper, beamed with joy and pride as they stood in the Yard watching morning exercises. “I always knew he was going to do it,” said Salvador.Commencement marked the first time the couple visited their son in Cambridge. On Saturday, parents and son will travel back home before Guillermo starts the next phase of his life.— Liz Mineo,Musical tribute Joshuah Campbell ’16 and Harvard friends perform “Sing Out, March On,” a special tribute to Commencement Speaker John Lewis.‘Don’t get weary in your well-doing’Between crack-of-dawn wake-up calls and the official graduation ceremony at Tercentenary Theatre, seniors poured into Memorial Church for a farewell service led by Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church Jonathan Walton.In his remarks, Walton urged the students to remember the “commitment to a moral ideal,” developed and nurtured over their four years at Harvard, as they begin their next chapter of their lives.“Regardless of your vocation or avocation, don’t get weary in your well-doing,” he said.  “When you witness others making peace with a mediocre status quo. When you feel yourself falling asleep to the lullabies of entitlement. And when you see mendacity and duplicity become markers of success and social promotion, remember that you have a higher call to service and sacrifice.”Standing up for what is right won’t be easy and it won’t necessarily bring accolades and awards, said Walton, but it will lead to a life of meaning.As has become his custom, Walton began the annual service by snapping a series of selfies with the graduates to cheers and applause. He closed with what has become his familiar blessing.“Be swift to love. Make haste to be kind. Be quick to compliment and be slow to criticize, and if you do criticize do so constructively. Love yourself, because loving yourself is a precondition for loving your neighbor. And when we do all of these things we might begin to approximate what it means for us to do justice, to love mercy, and to walk humbly before our God.”The remarks resonated with Pforzheimer resident Abdurezak Shemsu.Walton’s message of “taking what we have learned here and trying to be leaders, and to try and do things that actually have impacts in our communities, especially, is really motivating,” said Shemsu, who concentrated in economics with a secondary in global health and health policy.Long term, Shemsu hopes to enroll at Harvard Business School to pursue his interest in social entrepreneurship. “That’s the dream,” he said.— Colleen Walsh,Forward thinkerAs he has for the past few years, Donald H. Pfister, Asa Gray Professor of Systematic Botany, posted himself at the green dais to the left of Mass Hall to serve as head wrangler of the mass of cap-and-gown-clad Commencement participants. Looking out at the students, alumni, and dignitaries filing into Tercentenary Theatre for the morning exercises, Pfister, with a note of kind urgency in his voice, asked the president’s division to “move forward.”This year, he also had a trick up his sleeve — or, more precisely, in his ear. Pfister looked a little like a secret service agent, sporting a wired earpiece.“I got here at about 6:30 and picked up my radio,” said Pfister. “This is the first year we’ve used [them]. We coordinate from Sever Quad … so I can talk to the person on the other side of the Yard and say, ‘Is everything lined up, are we ready to go?’”— Colleen WalshTheir ‘Golden Hour’One of Commencement’s most delightful traditions are the many banners and trinkets waved by graduates as their degrees are conferred upon them. Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) graduates wave books during Commencement.Among those books were publications from Our Golden Hour, the children’s publishing company founded by graduate Maung Nyeu, Ed.D. ’18. As a child in Malaysia, Nyeu was punished for speaking his local Marma language. His company publishes children’s books based on stories collected by indigenous children from around the world with the aim of revitalizing endangered indigenous languages and reviving vanishing cultures of indigenous peoples.“I am happy and humbled that HGSE is making these children’s books available for new graduates to wave during the Commencement ceremony,” said Nyeu. Few get to see their books in print at all, never mind brandished by their friends and classmates during one of the happiest moments of their lives.— John Michael Baglionelast_img read more

McCormick reflects on plans for Campus Ministry

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first_imgIn the past several years, Fr. Pete McCormick has become one of the most recognizable figures on campus.He was formerly the rector of Keough Hall, a DJ at Legends and director of Campus Ministry’s freshman retreat program. Currently, he’s finishing an MBA in the Mendoza College of Business and serving as chaplain to the men’s basketball team. All of his past roles have a common theme, he said — connecting him with students and giving him a better sense of student needs, which he plans to use in his role as the new director of Campus Ministry.“I’ve had the benefit of working with students in all that I’ve done, so from my perspective, the focus of the director of Campus Ministry is really to be thinking about students first,” he said. “I really hope to be able to use that mindset as a way to give back. This office and the opportunities that I have are wasted if they’re not used every day to think about how we can care for students better.”McCormick said he sees Campus Ministry’s mission as a three-part process: first, an invitation, then a “content-rich place of formation” and finally, a mechanism for leading people to prayer.“I think that Campus Ministry should be a place that constantly invites people into what we are doing,” he said. “It shouldn’t be seen as exclusive or as a club, but a place that is welcoming to all.“And once people are here and feel comfortable, we can teach them about the things that matter most. I think all too often on campus and in our lives, we spend a lot of time talking about things that are important but are not necessarily what’s going on in the depth of our minds and hearts. We want to be a place where folks can ask hard questions about their lives and what they hope to be about.”The liturgical and folk choirs are one area where Campus Ministry has historically done well, he said, as are leadership development programs such as Anchor and Compass. This semester, Campus Ministry is beginning a spirituality study to evaluate current programming and brainstorm improvements for the future.“We need to know, what are we doing that’s good, what are we doing that’s not so good and what are we doing that could possibly be discontinued?” McCormick said. “Starting now, we’re going to do a benchmarking episode where we look at other universities to see what they’re doing and also begin to look in high schools to see what our future students look like now. We’re going to get some good information from those that are here, but I’m also interested in hearing about what the class of 2022 looks like so we can start to come up with new and creative ways to begin to build new opportunities.”He cited the relatively new pilgrimage program as an example of pre-planning done well — in the past few years, it’s become “one of the most exciting things that we’re doing,” sending students to Hawaii, the Holy Land, France, Mexico and beyond.“To think that four years ago, five years ago, we weren’t doing pilgrimages at all makes me think about what the next step will be now,” he said. “It’s always driving in the same direction though, as an invitation, a deepening of formation and a leading to prayer.”Ideally, Campus Ministry’s boundaries would blur fluidly with those of the Center for Social Concerns and other faith-based action opportunities on campus, he said.“You have to have both a spiritual and social component,” McCormick said. “If we’re not giving people the opportunity to actually practice their faith, then in my mind we’re not doing our jobs.“I just think that you can’t keep faith contained all in one self, so certainly we’re going to provide opportunities for retreats and reflection and the enhancement of knowledge, but yet my sincere hope is that students will take what they’re doing out into campus or to their halls, giving it back in different ways.”McCormick said the director of Campus Ministry position has been a dream of his for a while, inspired partially by his mentor and predecessor in the office, Fr. Jim King. McCormick will finish his MBA in May and continue as basketball chaplain, but he said he’s leaving many possibilities open about the future of Campus Ministry.“I’ve learned that things that are worth doing oftentimes require a little bit of risk,” he said. “Sometimes we’re tempted to play it safe, to stay in our comfort zones. My approach to Campus Ministry is going to be to have a little bit of risk that we enter into with our programming, a little bit of risk when it comes to our invitation to formation.“I just think that leaving that space open to a bit of risk is where God finds his way in. And it’s too tempting to be controlling to our own environments, but it makes it really difficult for the Holy Spirit to work if we have no interest in trying something new.”Despite a new office and a staff of 30 working under him, McCormick said he sees this role as a chance to continue what he’s always done — working with students and getting out in the community.“I’ve got great people who are working here, so I’m excited to go out and see the retreats. I’m excited to go and listen to a concert. I’m excited to go hear confessions for people on a pilgrimage or whatever the case may be,” he said. “It’s really going to come down to getting invested in the people that are here, and that’s going to lead to all different sorts of possibilities.”Tags: Campus Ministry, Faith, Fr. Pete, servicelast_img read more

Darren Criss Discusses Penning Lea Michele’s Glee Swan Song

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first_imgDarren Criss may play a singer/song stylist/rock goddess in Hedwig and the Angry Inch, but did you know he’s also that in real life? Well, two of those, at least. Earlier this year, the Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner penned Lea Michele’s swan song for the Glee series finale. Take a look at this video from Deadline as Criss discusses the genesis of the track, titled “This Time,” from sheepishly asking Ryan Murphy about writing original material for the show to hearing Michele bring the song to life. While Glee may be over, you can catch Criss in all his glittery glory as Hedwig at the Belasco Theatre through July 19. View Comments Related Shows Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 13, 2015 Hedwig and the Angry Inch Darren Crisslast_img read more

Olympic Colors in Flowers

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first_img The community project from the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games offers individuals,organizations and businesses a list of plants chosen to reflect the distinctive “Look of the Games.” The plants will help people create and display the Quilt of Leaves colors for the 1996 Olympic GamesJuly 19 to Aug. 4. You may not be competing in next summer’s Olympic Games, but you can still show your truecolors as part of the Quiltscape program, said Paul Thomas, a horticulturist with the University ofGeorgia Extension Service. “The Quiltscape program gives everyone a chance to be part of the event and look like it,” he said.”You can use approved plants that are a part of the venues throughout the Games. “You can spruce up your town square, your church and school grounds, your home flower gardenor your office window box using the Quiltscape plant list,” he said. ACOG has released the “Look of the Games” plant list in the Olympic colors: blue, gold, green,purple and red. The Olympic committee worked with Extension specialists, UGA horticulture faculty, commercialdesigners and landscapers to prepare a list of plants to match the colors of the games. Plants were chosen for both sun and shade, tall and short, dry to moist growing conditions and heattolerance for Georgia’s infamous August weather. “The group went through thousands of plants and selected those that are in bloom in August andare heat-tolerant and low-risk,” Thomas said. “The listed plants should look good under most weather conditions,” he said. “ACOG wantedplants that would look good two weeks before the Games and at least a week after.” The list includes Georgia favorites such as ageratum, coleus, zinnia, butterfly bush, crape myrtle,hosta, impatiens and caladium. It also has black-eyed Susan, Christmas fern, elephant ear, crimsonfountain grass and many others. Commercial nurseries and garden centers plan to carry these selected plants to help homeownersand businesses take part in the Quiltscape program, which will officially begin in January. “These plants will be available,” Thomas said, “But if you know you’ll need a large order, Irecommend reserving your plants with your local nursery now. “Get a soil test done, decide what to do to your site and buy plants and supplies early,” he said.”With so many people involved, there may be shortages of plants and other materials like fertilizer,soil amendments, lime or pine straw.” Even with a tested plant list and the best intentions, growing flowers in August in Georgia won’t beeasy. “It’s important to know how you plan to water your plants,” Thomas said. “If it rains, no problem.But if it’s dry, you need to plan to irrigate or water early in the morning, not while visitors areadmiring your handiwork.” To make sure the plants flower on schedule, consider buying one-gallon plants rather than thesmaller bedding plants, Thomas said. “They may cost more, but they have a larger root system,” he said. “If we have our typical hot, dryAugust, small plants just won’t make it.” For a brochure on the Quiltscape program, contact ACOG, Quiltscape Program, 250 WilliamsStreet, Suite 6000, P. O. Box 1996, Atlanta, GA 30301-1996. Your county Extension agent also has the Quiltscape plant list and brochures about growingperennials and annuals for next summer or any time.last_img read more