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Final Task Force Meeting Tonight

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first_img Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here A little less than four months ago, violence erupted in South Apopka with three shooting deaths of residents in the span of eight days. In response to that, a group of concerned citizens formed the Apopka Community Task Force on Violence. Typically a task force is the creation of an elected official or a governing body, but this grass roots effort seemed to take shape in an almost organic nature.The final Apopka Community Task Force on Violence meeting is tonight at 6:00 p.m. at the John Bridges Center located at 445 West 13th Street in Apopka.The event is entitled: Final Community Listening MeetingIt’s facilitated by Co-Chairs Rod Love and Ken Wilson, who are hoping for an interactive workshop tonight, driven by the community who will identify the problems and develop proposed solutions to be submitted to area leaders to address community based needs, i.e., mentoring programs, crime prevention activities, job coaching and placement as well gender specific services for males and females, according to Love.“The community has a role and a responsibility to play in this issue,” said Love. “But I think our elected officials have a role to play as well. I’m hoping to conclude this task force with a lot of great ideas and solutions tonight…just as we have gotten at every event throughout the three months of our work.”Tracy Maxwell, a retired military trainer, is an expert in the area of enhancing and developing alternative programs for youth.  He will open the evening with a motivational speech. Maxwell is a dynamic and charismatic speaker based in Ocala, according to Love.Dr. Randy Nelson, a researcher and professor at Bethune-Cookman University, will also speak. Dr. Nelson is a nationally recognized law enforcement trainer in the area of community and law enforcement engagement techniques.The Task Force is encouraging clergy and civic leaders to come out and participate with constituents and hear their concerns as well as their proposed solutions. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 The Anatomy of Fear TAGSApopka Community Task Force on violence Previous articleDeputies Free Bear Stuck in CarNext articleChief McKinley: Contact police before posting crimes Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Mayor Urges Pasadenans to Keep Guard Up in Fight Against COVID-19

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first_imgGovernment Mayor Urges Pasadenans to Keep Guard Up in Fight Against COVID-19 3 new infections reported in city By BRIAN DAY Published on Tuesday, September 8, 2020 | 3:29 pm Business News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Herbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTop Important Things You Never Knew About MicrobladingHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWhat Is It That Actually Makes French Women So Admirable?HerbeautyHerbeauty Subscribe Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Pasadena Mayor Tornek said Tuesday he was glad to see the progress so far in battling COVID-19, but warned this is not the time to become complacent.Three new infections were detected in the city, and no additional fatalities, according to Pasadena Public Health Department data. Only a single infection was reported Monday.Pasadena had seen a total of 2,443 cases of COVID-19 and 117 deaths since the start of the pandemic.Despite the relatively low numbers, city health officials have cautioned that may be partially due to fewer people receiving tests over the holiday weekend.Tornek urged residents to not lose focus when it comes to combating COVID-19.“Some of you may be tired of hearing me tell you that until we have drugs that work, all we have to fight the infection are social distancing, cloth face covering, and good sanitation,” the mayor said in a video statement. “Happily, it seems that you are listening. We’re slowing the spread of the disease, and so more businesses are being allowed to reopen.”But the work is far from over, he said.“The challenge now is not to repeat what happened in July, when we relaxed, and the spread took off again,” Tornek said. “So please, let’s all keep doing what we’re doing: Wearing our face coverings and avoiding social gatherings. If we do, we can reopen even more businesses and get our kids back into school sooner. Remember, we really are all in this together.”Huntington Hospital reported treating 27 COVID-19 patients on Tuesday. Seven tests were pending.The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health announced 439 new infections and seven new deaths.“Today’s low number of new cases and deaths reflect both a lag in reporting and less testing availability over the holiday,” the agency said in a written statement.L.A.County had recorded 249,241 COVID-19 cases and 6,036 deaths since the onset of the pandemic.Just over 940 patients were hospitalized with the virus countywide on Tuesday, with 33 percent of them being treated in intensive care units.The county’s overall positivity rate stood at 10 percent, with more than 2.38 million tests administered, officials said.L.A. County Director of Public Health Barbara Ferrer thanked the public for modifying Labor Day celebrations to help stem the spread of the novel coronavirus.“As we prepare for schools reopening to provide services for high-need students that require in-person support, we all must do our very best to minimize participating in non-essential activities that create risk of virus transmission,” Ferrer said.“L.A. County is still among the California counties with high rates of community transmission. Before we get into cooler weather and flu season, we need to significantly lower the number of new cases,” according to Ferrer. “This is the only path forward that allows us to get more students back to school and reopen more business sectors.”Public health officials at the state level reported 2,676 new COVID-19 infections and 32 additional deaths. The state had seen 737,911 infections and 13,758 deaths, in all.The state’s average positivity rate over the past week was 3.8 percent, while the 14-day rate was 4.3 percent, the California Department of Public Health said in a written statement.As of Tuesday, Los Angeles County accounted for 34 percent of California’s COVID-19 cases and 44 percent of the state’s fatalities. More Cool Stuff Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDScenter_img Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  22 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Make a comment Top of the News STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

The ending as beginning: Commencement ’18

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first_imgHarvard’s annual Commencement is both a conclusion and a start for those graduating. But the day also is a gathering of the far-flung Crimson clan under tents and trees in a party atmosphere. Below are snippets from the festive day from start to finish, with the most recent moments at the top, presented as snapshots of the 367th Commencement.Sunrise on life after graduationThe most memorable Commencement week moment for Govind Bindra ’18 was not when he received the diploma that he held proudly in his hands at Mather House ceremonies. It came when he watched the sun rise three days earlier with the people he feels closest to, his roommates.“We have been together and stayed together since freshman year,” Bindra said. “The friendships I have with them, these are the kinds of friendships I intend to keep for a lifetime.”He came to Harvard from Tennessee to study chemistry, but what he learned was that people are what makes an experience.“Despite what I learned developing my major, the most significant thing Harvard has taught me is that it’s the diversity of people and sharing this experience with them that is profound,” he said.And he’ll take that spirit to look ahead.“I’ve decided for myself I’m not going to leave my best years here,” he said. “We are moving on now, and I can’t wait to see where our paths take us.”— Deborah Blackwell,‘Your next step is up to you’When Claudette Taylor came to the United States from Jamaica more than three decades ago, she never dreamed that her grandson would become a Harvard College graduate. But she stood proudly by Razaak Eniola Jr. ’18 Thursday, as he talked about how his grandmother has always inspired him.“Knowing where my family has come from, knowing their stories, knowing their sacrifices to bring me where I am today, I’m really happy and really proud,” he said.Taylor arrived alone to New York City and earned money by cleaning floors, working hard to follow her dream.“I got my green card, went to school, became a medical assistant, and started working in a hospital,” she said. “Years after that believe it or not, I went on and got my master’s in health care management and health services administration. Then I started teaching as a professor at Long Island University. This is a real immigrant story.”Although Eniola concentrated in the history of science and mastered Chinese, his path may also lead him toward health care. He’s surrounded by family in that field. Eniola’s father practices internal medicine near their home in Salisbury, Md., his aunt is a nurse, her husband is a doctor, and an uncle is an X-ray technician.While Eniola is considering pre-med with a focus in health care policy for his postgraduate work, his grandmother had her own words of wisdom for him on his special day.“Do something in the medical field, because there will always be sick people,” she said. “But I’m just so proud of you, so happy, and your next step is up to you.”— Deborah Blackwell,An end, yes, or maybe a beginningWhen Darlington Nwaudo ’18 first saw his diploma after exiting the podium during Kirkland House’s afternoon Commencement ceremonies, he could not decide if graduating from Harvard is an ending or a beginning.“I am so excited and feel that it’s crazy that it all comes to an end right now, and everything that I’ve been working for the last four years is here in this diploma,” he said.But his parents weren’t concerned. Originally from Nigeria, they felt nothing but excitement that their son had received his degree in molecular and cellular biology. He hopes to become a surgeon.“After four years, he is standing here with his diploma,” said Jane Nwaudo, Darlington’s mother. “It’s just amazing.” She is excited that her son will be moving closer to their home in St. Paul, Minn., to attend medical school at the University of Chicago. “It’s driving distance,” she said.After a few minutes, Nwaudo decided his diploma represented much more than just an ending or a beginning.“I’m so thankful for this opportunity, to be able even to study here, to have all the incredible faculty, the incredible experience,” he said. “I just feel so lucky.”— Deborah Blackwell,With staff and top hat, the sheriff’s viewThere are lots of longstanding Commencement traditions at Harvard, but few are as dramatic — or as boisterous — as the one that Peter Koutoujian M.C./M.P.A. ’03, gets to lead every year.As Middlesex County sheriff, he heads the morning processional of University presidents past and present (and this year a president-elect), followed by members of the Corporation, the provost, and Overseers, through the Old Yard and into Tercentenary Theatre.Then, after a solemn walk across the stage, Koutoujian obliges the provost’s ritual command to “Pray, give us order.” Wearing a top hat, the sheriff pounds a silver-topped staff three times on the granite steps, and with a “Let’s get ready to rumble!” style gusto faces the crowd and delivers the precious words that students and their proud families have longed to hear at graduation:“As the high sheriff of Middlesex County, I declare that the meeting will be in or-duhhhh!” “Everyone enjoys that moment so much,” said Koutoujian of his let-it-rip emphasis on order, using a British-ish accent that he calls “channeling my inner John Harvard.”“It’s incumbent upon the sheriff to set the tone for the entire Commencement,” he said.,A former state representative, Koutoujian first attended Commencement when he earned a mid-career master’s degree from Harvard Kennedy School in 2003.“I don’t really remember much of that day because I was just overwhelmed” by all that was going on, he confessed.But since Gov. Deval Patrick appointed him sheriff in 2011, he has been able to relive Commencement again and again, from the stage.“Now, I get to enjoy that day in a way that I appreciate completely differently, and wish I had appreciated more as a student.”Though the sheriff’s role, which dates to the 17th century, is mainly ceremonial, it wasn’t always that way.“At one point, these graduations were quite celebratory, meaning that it wasn’t even just the students, alumni, and families that would attend the graduations, but the public would attend because there weren’t many opportunities to have local festivities,” Koutoujian said. “So they’d really get out of hand, and they’d need the sheriff to maintain order. That’s how it started, and that’s why I’m asked to give order.”Even today, two to three dozen county deputy sheriffs and officers work in tandem with Harvard and Cambridge police during Commencement, he noted.Then there was that one time in 2013 when real life intervened, and order was called for.Koutoujian said he was making his way back from the Kennedy School’s graduation event and came upon a man assaulting a woman in the middle of Harvard Square as stunned bystanders looked on in horror. Still dressed in his top hat and tails and without a weapon or handcuffs, the 6-foot, 6-inch sheriff (that’s before the hat) confronted the man and, using his loudest Commencement voice, ordered him to stop.“And it worked!” said Koutoujian.So far, there haven’t been any Commencement disasters like forgetting his lines or breaking the staff. In fact, there have only been memorable moments of the best kind, like getting complimented by Aretha Franklin, or getting a hug from Oprah Winfrey. One treasured memento is a photo of 2017 honorand James Earl Jones clapping his hands and laughing joyously as Koutoujian opened the Morning Exercises.“One of the great voices of our time, celebrating my announcement!” he said in disbelief.Still, Koutoujian is careful to stick with the script and not get carried away with his yearly 15 seconds of fame.“The event itself is much more important than the people who are participating in it. So when you’re mindful of that, that you’re really just playing a role in an historic event, you understand it’s not about you at all, it’s about Harvard University.”— Christina Pazzanese,Making good on her goalStanding outside Winthrop House, Queen Lane reminisced about her daughter Jaina’s dreams of coming to Harvard.“She used to tell people she wanted to go to Harvard, and people would say, ‘Yeah, sure.’ She did it. It’s a dream come true for her.”A chemical and physical biology concentrator with a secondary in Global Health, Jaina will attend medical school at the University of Virginia in the fall. She plans to become a pediatric reconstructive surgeon, a career she chose in middle school after learning about Operation Smile, an international nonprofit that repairs children’s cleft lips and cleft palates.For Jaina, saying farewell to Harvard, a moment that had come on fast, could wait just a little longer.“It hasn’t hit yet,” Jaina said. “Maybe when I go home, it’ll hit me and I’ll realize I had graduated. For now, I’ll enjoy my last night at Harvard.”— Liz Mineo,Flowers for graduates, opportunity for vendorFor the past 25 years, Commencement Day has been a special time for David Greenberg. Greenberg is among a handful of flower sellers who set up shop near Harvard’s gates with carts of colorful bouquets.Presenting flowers to graduates and parents alike remains a popular tradition, said Greenberg, a Worcester resident who also sells graduation bouquets at Boston College and Boston University.For Harvard’s Commencement, Greenberg gets up at 4:30 a.m. to drive in from Worcester to find early parking on Massachusetts Avenue not far from Johnston Gate. His cart is filled with roses, spider mums, lilies, alstroemerias, carnations, and chrysanthemums. The most popular bouquet, a mix of roses and lilies, sells for $25. Greenberg said he does a brisk business at Commencement, selling between 100 and 150 bouquets, and he makes sure he never runs out of flowers.And in the best American capitalist tradition, when it rains, he sells umbrellas. At last year’s Commencement, held amid a pounding rainstorm, he sold nearly 100 of them.Greenberg said he enjoys being part of the festive atmosphere. and he welcomes the chance to trade his wares for joy. “I can’t tell you how much I make, but Harvard should let me sell flowers inside and get a percentage,” he said, showing that, as an astute businessman, he’s still thinking ahead.— Liz Mineo,Determined learnerBonnie Seymour’s road to Commencement was longer than most. Not in terms of miles, since the journeys of parents from around the world beat her commute from Rhode Island. But Seymour’s trip was a different kind of long, starting in the fourth grade, when she could neither read nor do simple mathematics.“It was difficult, I would shove my work in to the desk so no one would know,” she said.Seymour, graduating with a master’s in museum studies from the Extension School, was diagnosed with a learning disability and, luckily, received guidance from people who were able to puzzle out how she learned best. Her reading and math skills improved right away, and she would go on to earn a bachelor’s degree from the University of Rhode Island.“I am excited, this is kind of a big deal,” said Seymour, making her way into Tercentenary Theatre. “When I was younger, it was discovered I had a learning disability and they told me I probably wouldn’t make it to college. Now I’m getting a master’s. Ha! Ha!”— Alvin PowellGSD students take flightIt’s a Commencement tradition that soon-to-be-grads from the different Schools carry props into Tercentenary Theatre to signify their discipline. Some are obvious — like the inflatable globes waved by Kennedy School students or the children’s books by Ed School grads — and some less so.This year, students from the Graduate School of Design hung their hats with Legos, signifying the crucial role of design in building. Students in the master of design studies program had included small bird’s nests next to the Legos.Class Marshal Charles Newman explained that the nests represented migration, referencing to the students’ broad-based discipline, which required studies at various Schools.“This symbolizes our seasonal, if not daily, migration to different desks,” Newman said. “We would set up shop in one School and then move to the next.”— Alvin Powell,At Mass Hall, it’s about the hatsKatie Tiger is not sure who started the tradition, but she has embraced the Commencement Day custom of Mass Hall staffers donning impressive hats.“When I first started here almost seven years ago, someone said to me, ‘Oh, everybody wears hats in Mass Hall on Commencement Day,’ ” said Tiger, an executive assistant to President Drew Faust. “I got very excited and started hat shopping with my colleague, who was the provost’s assistant at the time,” and she convinced others who hadn’t been aware of the tradition to get aboard.Now, every April, Tiger organizes an office shopping trip to Salmagundi, a specialty hat shop in Boston. At least half a dozen colleagues join in the fun, trying on many hats, critiquing each other’s choices, and over time developing a millinery collection. (Cha Cha’s House of Ill Repute in New York is also a Tiger favorite.)The staffers spend most of the day in Mass Hall, ground zero on Commencement Day, in a constant swirl of activity, as they greet University officials, guests, alumni, and VIPs who are their own ceremonial hats and robes. The staffers don’t have their own official Commencement garb to wear, so donning their hats makes them feel festive and part of the day.,“When I put the hat on, it’s just about being part of the ceremonies and being into it,” said Theresa Lungu, the reception and correspondence coordinator at Mass Hall. “It’s like, ‘Ooh, it feels like I’m graduating!’ ”Lungu was new to Harvard last spring when the annual hat-shopping call went out. She eagerly got on board and found the camaraderie irresistible. “I was new, so to be included, for me, was — I really felt at home. OK, I’m part of Mass Hall. It was really great,” said Lungu.Being in Harvard Yard, sharing in the rich pageantry and the spirit of the celebration, is fun.“It’s such a special day for the entire community here, so it’s nice to be part of it and celebrate with them,” said Tiger. “Whoever started this tradition, I thank them, because it’s a great idea.”— Christina Pazzanese,At Kennedy School, wishes for futureAfter the Morning Exercises in the Yard, newly minted graduates of the Harvard Kennedy School headed to JFK Memorial Park for their own festivities under a giant tent.Archon Fung, academic dean and Winthrop Laflin McCormack Professor of Citizenship and Self-Government, told the graduates during his introductory remarks that “It is up to you to invent new ways forward because many of the old ways have lost their purchase.” Fung emphasized the importance of “lifting every voice” and leading by example. “The world desperately needs your creativity.”Dean Douglas Elmendorf then urged the graduates to “stand up for knowledge and against ignorance and fabrication,” echoing Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Class Day remarks the day before. He called for the graduates to exhibit integrity and courage, and even to “sit down” when necessary, to listen to others’ perspectives, especially when those perspectives provoke disagreement and thoughtfulness.— Katie Gibson,Some fond — and noisy — farewellsCommencement is one of the rare moments when the deans of all the Schools and faculties are in one place at one time. As such, it’s a fitting occasion for final farewells to outgoing leaders.This year, Provost Alan Garber bid farewell to Michael Smith, Edgerly Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, for “11 years of distinguished leadership.” (Smith is returning to teaching.)He also thanked Dean James Ryan, who is departing Harvard to take up the presidency of the University of Virginia, for his four years of service at the Graduate School of Education.Ryan received the most raucous sendoff, since several GSE grads had brought vuvuzelas to the ceremonies. After the wild rumpus subsided, it was perhaps appropriate that the dean introduced this year’s graduates by reading from Maurice Sendak’s “Where the Wild Things Are.”— Alvin Powell,A few laughs with that degreeThe conferring of honorary degrees, during which Provost Alan Garber introduces each recipient to President Drew Faust with a sometimes humorous preamble, is an important part of  Commencement. This year, seven degrees were awarded, including one to Harvey Fineberg, whose career has included stints as dean of the Harvard School of Public Health and president of the Institute of Medicine. He also held a position near and dear to Garber’s heart.“In 1997,” Garber said, “he was named to what many regard as the single most exalted academic leadership position in all of higher education. I refer of course, to the role of Harvard University provost.”Faust later piled on the humor, solemnly intoning as she conferred Fineberg’s Doctor of Laws, “Dexterous herder of Crimson cats, superlative exponent of human health, caring leader with a common touch. His given name is Harvey, but to us he’s always Harvard.”— Alvin Powell,Where next? Wherever the RV takes usMorgan Barraza can confidently claim to be unique in how she’ll celebrate her degree. Barraza, who received a master’s in education learning and teaching, will take a recreational vehicle first to her wedding and then back home to the Salt River Pima Reservation in Arizona, stopping to see friends along the way.Barraza, a Native American and member of the Salt River Pima, said that commencement ceremonies were extra special because several family members, including her grandmother, who was in the hospital for when she received her undergraduate degree from Columbia, were able to attend.“For her to be able to come here and see me, it’s a huge privilege, not only to our families but also to our particular communities,” Barraza said. “I want to return to my community and continue teaching.”— Alvin PowellSinging in the old and newMusic has been an integral part of Commencement for generations, as it was today at Tercentenary Theatre. In keeping with tradition, the Commencement Choir performed a version of Psalm 78 set to music by the 18th-century composer William Tans’ur. The piece has been part of Commencement since its inception. But the choir also made room for the new.“We are … sisters of mercy, brothers of love, lovers of life, the builders of nations,” reads one of the refrains in the composition “We Are …”  by Ysayë Maria Barnwell, a former member of the a cappella group Sweet Honey and the Rock. (The piece was a fitting choice, having also been performed at freshman convocation for the Class of 2018.)The song was not only a stylistic departure from other works in the Commencement program, said Director of Choral Activities Andrew Clark, who leads the Commencement Choir, but also a reflection of “the Harvard of today.”“This particular song really speaks powerfully to the continuum of inheriting the wonderful traditions and values and identities from our ancestors and those who came before us, but also projecting and putting forth our own hopes and aspirations for the future,” he said.“It was a piece that President Faust enjoyed as well,” Clark added. “So given her last Commencement with us, we thought we would perform it.”— Colleen WalshMaking his parents proudFor the parents of graduating senior Guillermo Gomez, the celebration was full of tradition and pomp, but also dreams and promise.A native of Fort Worth, Texas, Gomez grew up one of four siblings in a working-class family. His parents Salvador and Francisca Gomez immigrated from Mexico in 1995 seeking better opportunities.Salvador, a construction worker, and Francisca, a housekeeper, beamed with joy and pride as they stood in the Yard watching morning exercises. “I always knew he was going to do it,” said Salvador.Commencement marked the first time the couple visited their son in Cambridge. On Saturday, parents and son will travel back home before Guillermo starts the next phase of his life.— Liz Mineo,Musical tribute Joshuah Campbell ’16 and Harvard friends perform “Sing Out, March On,” a special tribute to Commencement Speaker John Lewis.‘Don’t get weary in your well-doing’Between crack-of-dawn wake-up calls and the official graduation ceremony at Tercentenary Theatre, seniors poured into Memorial Church for a farewell service led by Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church Jonathan Walton.In his remarks, Walton urged the students to remember the “commitment to a moral ideal,” developed and nurtured over their four years at Harvard, as they begin their next chapter of their lives.“Regardless of your vocation or avocation, don’t get weary in your well-doing,” he said.  “When you witness others making peace with a mediocre status quo. When you feel yourself falling asleep to the lullabies of entitlement. And when you see mendacity and duplicity become markers of success and social promotion, remember that you have a higher call to service and sacrifice.”Standing up for what is right won’t be easy and it won’t necessarily bring accolades and awards, said Walton, but it will lead to a life of meaning.As has become his custom, Walton began the annual service by snapping a series of selfies with the graduates to cheers and applause. He closed with what has become his familiar blessing.“Be swift to love. Make haste to be kind. Be quick to compliment and be slow to criticize, and if you do criticize do so constructively. Love yourself, because loving yourself is a precondition for loving your neighbor. And when we do all of these things we might begin to approximate what it means for us to do justice, to love mercy, and to walk humbly before our God.”The remarks resonated with Pforzheimer resident Abdurezak Shemsu.Walton’s message of “taking what we have learned here and trying to be leaders, and to try and do things that actually have impacts in our communities, especially, is really motivating,” said Shemsu, who concentrated in economics with a secondary in global health and health policy.Long term, Shemsu hopes to enroll at Harvard Business School to pursue his interest in social entrepreneurship. “That’s the dream,” he said.— Colleen Walsh,Forward thinkerAs he has for the past few years, Donald H. Pfister, Asa Gray Professor of Systematic Botany, posted himself at the green dais to the left of Mass Hall to serve as head wrangler of the mass of cap-and-gown-clad Commencement participants. Looking out at the students, alumni, and dignitaries filing into Tercentenary Theatre for the morning exercises, Pfister, with a note of kind urgency in his voice, asked the president’s division to “move forward.”This year, he also had a trick up his sleeve — or, more precisely, in his ear. Pfister looked a little like a secret service agent, sporting a wired earpiece.“I got here at about 6:30 and picked up my radio,” said Pfister. “This is the first year we’ve used [them]. We coordinate from Sever Quad … so I can talk to the person on the other side of the Yard and say, ‘Is everything lined up, are we ready to go?’”— Colleen WalshTheir ‘Golden Hour’One of Commencement’s most delightful traditions are the many banners and trinkets waved by graduates as their degrees are conferred upon them. Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) graduates wave books during Commencement.Among those books were publications from Our Golden Hour, the children’s publishing company founded by graduate Maung Nyeu, Ed.D. ’18. As a child in Malaysia, Nyeu was punished for speaking his local Marma language. His company publishes children’s books based on stories collected by indigenous children from around the world with the aim of revitalizing endangered indigenous languages and reviving vanishing cultures of indigenous peoples.“I am happy and humbled that HGSE is making these children’s books available for new graduates to wave during the Commencement ceremony,” said Nyeu. Few get to see their books in print at all, never mind brandished by their friends and classmates during one of the happiest moments of their lives.— John Michael Baglionelast_img read more

New Countertrafficking Command Center Is First of Its Kind

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first_img A new, high-tech command center in Key West will move the fight against illicit traffickers to a new level, Deputy Defense Secretary William J. Lynn III said. Just before cutting a ribbon to the Joint Operations Command Center alongside William F. Wechsler, deputy assistant secretary of defense for counternarcotics and global threats, Lynn said the threat that plagues the region has evolved beyond drugs alone. “Transnational criminal organizations are posing a not-very-well-understood, but growing, threat to the United States,” he told the task force staff. “It’s something I know you are on the front lines of addressing and, ultimately, preventing.” The new command center serves Joint Interagency Task Force South, a subordinate command to the Miami-based U.S. Southern Command that integrates military, interagency and international capabilities to combat illicit trafficking. Lynn traveled to Miami to meet with Air Force Gen. Douglas Fraser, SOUTHCOM commander, and his leadership team. In testimony last month before the House Armed Services Committee, Fraser called the task force “the center of U.S. maritime interdiction efforts in the Caribbean basin and eastern Pacific.” Using information from law enforcement agencies, the general added, the task force detects and monitors suspect aircraft and maritime vessels and then provides this information to international and interagency partners who have the authority to interdict illicit shipments and arrest members of transnational criminal organizations. Task force members represent each U.S. military service and most federal law enforcement agencies, including the Drug Enforcement Agency, the FBI and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Other members from the U.S. intelligence community represent the CIA, the Defense Intelligence Agency, the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency, the National Reconnaissance Office and the National Security Agency. The task force staff includes liaison officers from 13 nations: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, France, Mexico, the Netherlands, Peru, Spain and the United Kingdom. “We made the decision in April 2008 to apply our collective wisdom and knowledge across the interagency, our international partners and the joint team here,” Coast Guard Rear Adm. Daniel Lloyd, commander of Joint Interagency Task Force South, said during the ceremony opening the new operations center. The aim, he said, was “to come up with a better way to be even more effective in countering the illicit traffickers.” The new command center, Lloyd added, “is the first of its kind anywhere, and represents the very best way we know how to conduct the fight against illicit traffickers.” In the center, intelligence and operations functions come together in a state-of-the-art command, control, communications and intelligence facility, officials said, where the task force coordinates the use of Navy and Coast Guard ships and aircraft, Air Force and U.S. Customs Service aircraft, and aircraft and ships from allied nations and law enforcement agencies. “I think it’s important at this moment to recognize how far we’ve come,” Wechsler said. “Back in the 1980s, the mission set against which [the task force] was deployed was considered to be an unsolvable problem. There was a never-ending stream of air and maritime vessels headed right for our coast. It was a direct threat to U.S. sovereignty.” Today, he added, the problem has evolved, and so has the task force. “[It] is really, in my mind, a model — perhaps one of the best models of coordination that exists in the U.S. government,” he said. By Dialogo April 21, 2011last_img read more

9 months agoReal Betis interested in Inter Milan striker Lautaro Martinez

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first_imgReal Betis interested in Inter Milan striker Lautaro Martinezby Carlos Volcano9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveReal Betis are interested in Inter Milan striker Lautaro Martinez.Marca says Martinez has been placed on Real Betis’ radar for a potential January move.The Andalusians have made contact with the Nerazzurri to try to sign the player on loan with a purchase option.Martinez arrived in Italy from Racing Club last summer, for a fee of €25m and has since participated in 16 matches and has scored five goals.The Argentine is seen by Luciano Spalletti as the backup to Mauro Icardi and a move out of the Stadio Giuseppe Meazza seems complicated. TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img

3 days agoBarcelona coach Valverde: Slavia Prague an important game

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first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Barcelona coach Valverde: Slavia Prague an important gameby Carlos Volcano3 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona coach Ernesto Valverde says meeting Slavia Prague is an important game for his team’s efforts to secure qualification to the next Champions League round.Barca meet Slavia Prague on Wednesday night.”We expect a great rival, as they have shown in these two Champions League games that they have already played, and remember they eliminated Sevilla last year,” said Valverde.”They attack with many players, show their face, run a lot and will force us to have a great match.”It’s a fundamental game for us and for them.”Things are starting to become clear and that’s why the three points are so important.” last_img read more

State Must Ensure Law Enforcement Agencies Create a Balance in the Use of Force

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first_imgStory Highlights Prime Minister Holness also assured that the Jamaica Constabulary Force is taking the necessary steps to address the issue by instituting human rights training as a core component for new recruits. “The use of force policy must underscore the importance of the preservation of innocent lives and it must go further. It must also underscore the professional obligation to train members of the security forces to the highest standards so that they are able to ensure personal and public safety and be able to operate in varied circumstances.” Prime Minister Andrew Holness says the state must guarantee a process to ensure law enforcement agencies use force in a way that creates trust, builds confidence, bridges the gap and makes the public feel there is no need to fear the police. Prime Minister Andrew Holness says the state must guarantee a process to ensure law enforcement agencies use force in a way that creates trust, builds confidence, bridges the gap and makes the public feel there is no need to fear the police.According to Prime Minister Holness, policies must therefore be rooted in the requirement to find a balance between public safety and officer safety.“The use of force policy must underscore the importance of the preservation of innocent lives and it must go further. It must also underscore the professional obligation to train members of the security forces to the highest standards so that they are able to ensure personal and public safety and be able to operate in varied circumstances.”He was speaking on May 31 at the Caribbean Use of Force Conference at the Jamaica Conference Centre.The Conference was organized by INDECOM in partnership with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the British High Commission and the United States Embassy.The prime minister noted that the right balance is necessary to ensure that law enforcement officers will never hesitate to execute their duties for the safety of those they have sworn to protect. He added that a system must be in place that guarantees that where improper use of force is used, it will be investigated and addressed accordingly.“When issues occur which result in the abuse of rights or the loss of life there must be a well-respected, well-resourced institution that investigates, that looks into the details of how human rights were abused or the ultimate abuse, how life was lost,” he said.Prime Minister Holness also assured that the Jamaica Constabulary Force is taking the necessary steps to address the issue by instituting human rights training as a core component for new recruits.Additionally, the polygraphing of new recruits is being implemented.Prime Minister Holness concluded that critical to the transformation of the police force is the entrenchment of community policing which is key to building trust among the police, the communities and citizens with whom they come into contact on a daily basis.“Citizens have a duty and a responsibility to observe the law, so in the search for balance it is important that there is a positive statement from this conference reaffirming the need for the citizen to play their part in ensuring the rule of law and public order,” he urged.last_img read more

Provincial government submits reference question to BC Court of Appeal

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first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. — Joined by Attorney General David Eby and Environment and Climate Change Minister George Heyman at a press conference Thursday morning, B.C. Premier John Horgan announced the details of the government’s reference question to the B.C. Court of Appeal about whether it has the right to limit the amount of oil and diluted bitumen being imported to the province.The reference question concerns provincial autonomy, particularly the rights of B.C. to regulate the environmental and economic impacts of heavy oils, like diluted bitumen, transported through the province. It was filed today in the B.C. Court of Appeal. For its reference, the B.C. government is asking the court to review proposed amendments to the Environmental Management Act that would give the Province authority to regulate impacts of heavy oils, like diluted bitumen, which, when released into the environment, would endanger human health, the environment and communities.“We have asked the courts to confirm B.C.’s powers within our jurisdiction to defend B.C.’s interests, so that there is clarity for today and for the generations to come,” said Horgan. “Our government will continue to stand up for the right to protect B.C.’s environment, economy and coast.”In January, the provincial government proposed a second phase of regulations to improve preparedness, response and recovery from potential spills. The regulations would apply to pipelines transporting any quantity of liquid petroleum products, as well as rail or truck operations transporting more than 10,000 litres of liquid petroleum products. The government said the proposed regulations would ensure geographically appropriate response plans, improve response times, ensure compensation for loss of public use of land and maximize the application of regulations to marine transport. “We have been clear from the outset that the appropriate way to resolve disagreements over jurisdiction is through the courts, not through threats or unlawful measures to target citizens of another province,” said Eby. “This reference question seeks to confirm the scope and extent of provincial powers to regulate environmental and economic risks related to heavy oils like diluted bitumen.”This will be the third reference question that B.C. has sent to court. The first was regarding the constitutionality of polygamy, and the second was related to third-party advertising in elections. The B.C. Court of Appeal is the highest court to which the Province can send a reference question.“Our government is working to protect our economy, environment and communities by making sure we have effective spills prevention, response and recovery in place,” said Heyman. “A single spill of diluted bitumen would put at risk tens of thousands of jobs across B.C. We have a responsibility to ensure that every measure to reduce risks is in place, and that those responsible for spills are held accountable for fixing any environmental damage they cause.”last_img read more

I’m glad I don’t have to bowl to Russell, says Kuldeep Yadav

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first_imgKolkata: Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) have had a stupendous time in this edition’s Indian Premier League (IPL). The franchise, captained by Dinesh Karthik, has won two matches out of three and are in the middle of the points table. They lost to the Delhi Capitals (DC) at the Feroz Shah Kotla in New Delhi, but prior to that, managed to beat Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) and Kings XI Punjab (KXIP) at Eden Gardens. One of the main reasons why the Knights have been competitive is Andre Russell, who is currently the third highest run-scorer in IPL 2019 with 159 runs at an average of 79.50 and a titanic strike-rate of 248.43. The Jamaican has also smacked 15 sixes, the most in the tournament thus far and quite rightly, Kuldeep Yadav, KKR’s chinaman bowler, has hailed the hulk-like batsman as a game-changer. “You need a player who can change the game for you. We have Russell in that category. He is a perfect game changer for us. “We all are proud of him. When he is on fire, he is unstoppable. I am glad I don’t have to bowl to him (Russell),” Kuldeep was quoted as saying. Yadav also sounded confident about the Knight Riders’ chances of winning their third title in the T20 league. “He is the kind of player who can destroy any bowler’s economy rate. The way we have been playing and have showed fighting spirit, I think KKR will win the trophy this year,” he added. Russell has scored 159 runs from three innings at 79.50 with a strike rate of 248.83 in the first three matches. He also took five key wickets for his team. Before the start of the tournament, the majority of the fans and pundits picked the likes of Virat Kohli, Rohit Sharma, Chris Gayle and other destructive top-order batsmen as favourites to win the ‘Orange Cap’, but Russell has surprised one and all with his hitting and more importantly consistency. Considering the position he bats at and the number of balls he gets to face in an innings, 159 runs in three matches is a Herculean effort by the Windies all-rounder. He has scored 20 (or more) runs in an over thrice in IPL 2019 already, and with 15 sixes to his credit, Russell is also the number one batsman in the list of ‘most sixes in IPL 2019’, after the first week. His teammate Nitish Rana, Warner, and Chris Gayle are behind him on the list with 10 sixes each. Russell’s impact in the first week of IPL 2019 was bigger than any other player in the tournament. As far as Kuldeep is concerned, he hasn’t had the best of tournaments, picking up only a couple of wickets in three matches with best figures of 2/41 against the Capitals in the last encounter. KKR are next scheduled to lock horns against the Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB) at the M Chinnaswamy Stadium in Bangalore on April 5.last_img read more

Football JK Dobbins shines in first game as starter at running back

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Freshman running back J.K. Dobbins (2) watches as teammate J.T. Barrett runs the ball for a touchdown during the season opener vs Indiana. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorBLOOMINGTON, Ind — From the first play in Ohio State’s 49-21 win over Indiana, the Buckeyes’ offense was carried by running back J.K. Dobbins — a true freshman.Two plays later, he caught a pass on a wheel route for 18 yards. And for the rest of the game, it was more of the same as he continued to demonstrate both his ability to shake defenders loose with his elusiveness in the open field, as well as the physicality needed to plow through the defensive line.For coach Urban Meyer, Dobbins’ big performance Thursday was less of a shock and more of a reflection of what the coaches have seen since he arrived in Columbus.“I kind of tempered my emotions with [the media] early on, because we have seen that since spring practice. He has had a hell of a camp,” Meyer said.OSU freshman running back J.K. Dobbins (2) carries the ball during the Spring Game on April 15. Scarlet beat Gray 38-31. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Former Photo EditorBy the end of the game, Dobbins had set a record for the most rushing yards by an Ohio State first-year running back in the first game of the season with 182 yards on 29 carries.He did not enter the week as the starter, however.In the team’s depth chart, Dobbins was listed as an ‘Or’ alongside Mike Weber, last season’s starter. Meyer noted Thursday night that Weber was still only at 80 percent and that while Weber could have gone, the preference was to not play him.The chance to start came at a time when Dobbins had southeast Texas on his mind. The native of La Grange, Texas, which is a 101-mile drive west of Houston, said his family has been safe from the effects of Hurricane Harvey that has ravaged the Houston area since last weekend, but he still has friends in the city who have dealt with the storm’s destruction.“[I] kind of thought of it as motivation for me because I’m probably the only positive thing going on in my town right now,” Dobbins said. “I just thought of it as bringing my city up. So, that’s why I came out here and played as hard as I could.”Then, a couple days before the game, Dobbins learned he would be starting in his first game with the Buckeyes, and would get that chance to provide a light for what has been a dark time in his hometown. “I thought I was going to start midway through the week whenever Weber was — he’s having a hamstring problem so, I just, when I heard that I just thought of it as an open opportunity for me,” Dobbins said.Nearly two weeks ago, running backs coach Tony Alford, said he believed the freshman would have a substantial impact this season. After his performance against the Hoosiers, wide receiver Johnnie Dixon, who worked out with Dobbins during the summer, said the 18-year-old’s dedication to the work and ability to make challenging tasks look effortless has really caught his eye.Ohio State freshman running back J.K. Dobbins prepares for practice at fall camp on Aug. 5. Credit: Colin Hass-Hill | Sports Editor.“A lot of kids come in and they don’t really have it from Day One. [Dobbins] had it from Day One,” Dixon said. “Even watching him in spring, I’m like, this kid is amazing. And I knew that he would get out here and do the same thing we see in practice all the time. It was just, nobody else really know because they don’t see it. But the kid — the sky’s the limit for that kid for sure.”Judging from the Texan’s performance on the big stage, Meyer said he seems some of the same characteristics in Dobbins that he saw in another former running back.“He’s close [to Ezekiel Elliott]. Yeah, he’s very similar to Zeke,” Meyer said. “Very similar about the way he works. He handles his business like a pro. I mean he walked in like a grown man.”Though the players and coaches see a potential breakout talent in Dobbins, Meyer said he is expecting Weber to return next week and for him to slide right back into the mix for playing time.Meyer would not go so far as to say who would be out there taking the opening snaps in the against Oklahoma on Sept. 9, but he said he knows he can expect more of the same from Dobbins in the weeks to come.“J.K. Weber,” Meyer said jokingly, when asked who would start next week. “We get Mike back next week, and that is going to be a nice one-two punch. J.K. has even more in the tank.” read more