Tag: 贵族宝贝

Governor declares this ‘wind week’ in Iowa

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first_imgA 150-foot-long wind turbine blade positioned on the northwest corner of the Iowa State Fairgrounds was the site of a ceremony Monday. Governor Kim Reynolds signed the blade — and signed a proclamation declaring this “wind week” in Iowa.“As the governor of this state, I certainly understand the importance that renewable energy has not only for Iowans, but for our economy,” Reynolds said. American Wind Energy Association C-E-O Tom Kiernan says more than nine-thousand people are working in 10 different Iowa factories that are supplying things like wind turbine towers and blades.“I was in Washington, D.C. with a wind tech from Iowa talking about the jobs and he corrected me. He said: ‘No, no, no. This isn’t just a job. This is a career,’” he said. “….We’re having, because of the training programs, more people stay in Iowa and rural America.” Iowa Economic Development Authority director Debi Durham says one-third of all consumers make purchasing decisions based on a company’s environmental and social impact.“Indeed, businesses are increasingly focused on their environmental footprint and the fact that we can power a production economy with affordable, reliable and renewable energy is a powerfall calling card for our state,” Durham said. “It’s one of the many reasons sustainability-minded businesses like Facebook and Apple and Google have chosen Iowa.” By 2020, Iowa wind turbines are projected to account for 40 percent of the energy produced in the state.last_img read more

Two residents at Iowa Veterans Home test positive for COVID-19

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first_imgMARSHALLTOWN — The odds finally caught up with the largest long-term care facility in the state, as the Iowa Veterans Home now reports two positive cases of COVID-19 in residents.Commandant Timon Oujiri  says while the preferred number of cases is zero, having only two residents diagnosed is a testament to the staff. The two who tested positive were in two separate buildings that house a total of 16 residents.  “We were doing our dangest to keep it out of IVH all together, but unfortunately, as everybody knows this virus is pretty sneaky. It gets around,” Oujiri says. “One hand a couple of symptoms, the other one did not. Now we’ve tested everyone, the households that they were in. So the other 14 have come back negative, so that’s good.”In addition, 15 staff members tested positive for the virus out of 300 staffers tested. Oujiri took the step last week of closing off the I-V-H campus to the general public. “We did have a couple of community people come up and speak to our residents,” he says. “It was fantastic, it was great, but they weren’t wearing masks and we have no idea. We’re trying to control what we can control.”Oujiri says when it comes to opening the I-V-H back up, they will follow whatever federal and state guidelines are recommended.  “We don’t want to have the residents not have their families here either. It’s a hardship on them. It’s a hardship on us. It’s very, very difficult,” he says. “Now with spring here, we are getting our residents outside and I want to say thank you for the community on following my request that they don’t come on to campus.”Oujiri says Governor Reynolds and State Representative Mark Smith have done a wonderful job keeping the vets’ home stocked with the needed supplies. He says 4,000 gowns were due to be delivered on Monday.last_img read more

BC Games medal haul for Nelson Kayak and Canoe Club paddlers

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first_imgWhen paddlers from the Nelson Kayak and Canoe Club boarded the bus for the Red-Eye ride to the Fraser Valley to compete in the BC Summer Games winning was probably the last thing on their minds.Teenagers like their sleep and finding a comfortable spot on the bus first and foremost.However, after arriving at the Summer Games, the paddlers got down to business, winning double-digit medals for the Kootenay Zone during the three-day competition hosted in Abbotsford.“We’re really happy with our results,” said 15-year-old Heather Potkins, a veteran with the two-year-old Nelson Kayak and Canoe Club.“We haven’t competed at a lot of races as we’re a new club, only two years old,” Potkins added. “So for many of us this was the first time at the Summer Games, so we’re pretty excited with our results.”To put in to perspective how dominant a performance this was for Nelson Kayak and Canoe Club paddlers, the Kootenays won 15 medals to finish seventh in the eight-zone BC Summer Games standings.Nelson Kayak and Canoe Club paddlers won 14 of those medals. Elizabeth Mayer of Trail won the other medal, a Silver in the Girls Pentahlon High Jump. Potkins captured a handful of those medals, finishing first in C1 slalom, second in C1 1000 and third in C1 500 Train to Train.Potkins also combined with Anna Milde to capture the bronze medals in C2 2000 Open race and partnered with Tessa Timmermans to win Bronze in C2 500 Train to Train.Other medals were won by Milde and Bailey Stefani, Gold in C2 500 Learn to Train and Gold by Stefani C1 200 Learn to Train.The quartet of Timmermans, Potkins, Stefani and Milde also combined to win bronze in Girls C4 500 Open.The remaining members of the Kootenay paddling contingent includes Erica Potkins, Carson VanHorne, Tess Nuttall and Noah Malefant.Coaches are Alena Hammer, Thomas Miller and Jason Rusu.Potkins said a lot of the success for the Nelson Kayak and Canoe Club is due to former Canadian Olympian, and current coach, Jason Rusu.Rusu was the first first athlete from Saskatchewan to be named to the Canadian team and competed in the 1992 Summer Olympics in K-2 500m and 1000m in Barcelona Spain.Potkins said the paddlers train three times a week on Kootenay Lake.This is the second meet in a few weeks for the Nelson Kayak and Canoe Club. The club attended an endurance race in Kamloops recently and is expected to take their boats on the road for a meet slated for Maple Ridge in September.last_img read more

Lies You Want to Believe

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first_imgEvery day I watch the social media advertisements roll by on Facebook and LinkedIn. They are all designed to capture your attention with a hyperbolic headline aimed at reminding you of something that makes you unhappy (remember dissatisfaction?).Today I saw no less than three advertisements on LinkedIn, all of which began with the headline: “Cold Calling Is Dead.” If you have learned to hate cold calling, this advertisement is aimed directly at you. I clicked on all three because I suspected that they were placed by three different companies. I was correct. Three different companies all using the same headline.All of these marketers know what an easy mark you are when it comes to cold calling (unless, of course, you are here reading this blog, or Mike Weinberg’s, or Jeb Blount’s, or Tibor Shanto’s). Any of us can teach you how to cold call, and each of us laughs when we read these ads because we all have clients running up their numbers strictly by using the phone.I saw another ad that proclaimed: The Death of Outside Salespeople. This one wasn’t aimed at salespeople. Instead, this advertisement preys on sales managers and sales leaders who don’t know how to produce the results they want from their sales force and who wish there was a cheaper sales force they could employ. This ad speaks to their dissatisfaction like the cold calling ad speaks to salespeople.Outside salespeople aren’t going anywhere anytime soon, at least not those who know how to create value. Inside salespeople can also create value, but it’s more difficult to create and capture some larger, more complex opportunities without the relationships that are more easily developed face-to-face.If you want to produce better results, you are better off facing the thing that you fear or struggle with than avoiding it. If you don’t like the phone, learning to be effective making your calls is a better plan than trying to find a way not to have to make your calls. If you don’t like a big, expensive sales force, learn to lead it and teach it to succeed and it will be the cheapest sales force money can buy.Stop believing the lies that you want to believe. Avoidance isn’t a growth strategy.last_img read more

2016 NTL Referee Upgrades

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first_imgRelated LinksNTL Referee Upgrades Congratulations to the following referees on receiving upgrades at the 2016 National Touch League. Level 4 Nicole AlexanderLevel 5Tim Ah SeeJustin ApplebyPhil BalcombeJake DavisAlex FaulkerJustin HillDarryl LyonRobert MackayZan McCahonDean McDonaldAdam TurnerAlison WattersNicole WestBrendon WilsonAndy YonLouise FernanceJosh LittleAndrew WatkinsLevel 6Danielle NunnKathleen SpenceLevel 5 Senior Peter Cramp Nicole DicksonIvan GianmarcoDavid TewkesburyBruce CrosbyRod SawellPaul RichardsonLevel 6 SeniorJamie BanfieldAnthony CollinsRob CooperAmanda DraperPaul KhoudairChris ReynoldsNicole Teo last_img

Calgary city council votes to continue exploring 2026 Winter Olympics bid

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first_imgCALGARY – Calgary city council has voted to continuing exploring a potential bid for the 2026 Winter Olympics.The Calgary Bid Exploration Committee presented council Wednesday with an option not to move forward with the bid, and another option to keep exploring potential funding opportunities.Council endorsed the second choice, saying it would provide the city’s administration with the time to investigate potential solutions “that could help reduce the city’s risks” associated with a bid.The city says that regardless of whether a bid goes forward, the exploration committee’s work has provided valuable information about the costs of sustaining or upgrading Calgary’s 1988 Olympic facilities.The 17-member committee chaired by former Calgary police chief Rick Hanson has said that while it’s feasible for the 1988 Olympics host city to have another turn, more work is needed to determine if it would be prudent.When the bid exploration group was formed, it expected a September deadline for the city to decide on a bid, but the International Olympic Committee has since extended the invitation phase for 2026 bids, meaning the city has another year to mull it over.The committee told city council last month that the price tag to hold the 2026 Games would be about $4.6 billion.It said the Games would generate almost half that in revenue, but another $2.4 billion would be needed.The 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver and Whistler, B.C., cost $7.7 billion.Calgary’s estimate is lower in part because the city could reuse venues from the 1988 Winter Games.Sion, Switzerland, and Innsbruck, Austria, are among Calgary’s potential rivals for a 2026 bid.last_img read more

Rogers cutting onethird of digital content and publishing team about 75 jobs

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first_imgTORONTO – Rogers Communications said Thursday that it had laid off about 75 full-time employees from its digital content and publishing team.The Toronto-based company said the cuts amount to about one-third of the department, reducing the size of that team to about 150 people.The digital content and publishing division produces content for Maclean’s, Today’s Parent, Hello! Canada, Flare, MoneySense, Canadian Business and Chatelaine.Rogers said the job cuts reflects the “headwinds” faced by its industry, which has been dealing with a years-long change in consumer reading habits and a loss in advertising revenue at most established publishers.The company also said the reorganization will see Steve Maich, senior vice-president of digital content and publishing, leave the organization later this summer. Sarah Trimble was named vice-president, digital content and publishing.“Throughout his extraordinary 14-year tenure at Rogers Media, Steve Maich has left an indelible mark on all those who have had the pleasure of working with him, and all the loyal readers who have enjoyed his writing,” Rick Brace, president of Rogers Media, said in a statement.Lianne George, editor in chief at Chatelaine, also tweeted that she has decided to leave the magazine and Rogers.“It’s been the greatest joy to work for this publication, and with this wonderful, big-hearted group. I know the team will continue to do great things,” George tweeted from her verified account.The majority of the cuts were staff based in Toronto and included a variety of editorial roles.Rogers has one of Canada’s biggest media businesses, active in print and digital publishing, radio broadcasting and television including the Sportsnet specialty channels.However, Rogers Media is much smaller than the company’s wireless and cable divisions.It said that all of its current publishing brands will continue and the company remains committed to producing high-quality editorial content.Companies in this story: (TSX:RCI.B)last_img read more

Mitsubishi calls for dismissal of trade secrets lawsuit launched by Bombardier

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first_imgCompanies in this story: (TSX:BBD.B)The Canadian Press MONTREAL — Mitsubishi Aircraft Corp. is seeking the dismissal of a lawsuit by Bombardier Inc., calling the allegations of trade secret misappropriations “baseless and without merit.”The Japanese jet maker filed a motion to dismiss Bombardier’s case in a U.S. federal court in Seattle on Thursday, saying the lawsuit aims to “disrupt development” of a rival jet.Bombardier sued Mitsubishi in October over allegations that some of the Quebec company’s former employees passed on documents containing trade secrets to Mitsubishi before going to work for the company.Bombardier’s complaint also targets Aerospace Testing Engineering & Certification (AeroTEC), which supports the Japanese multinational in the development of its regional jet, as well as several ex-Bombardier employees. Bombardier alleges Mitsubishi Aircraft and AeroTEC recruited no fewer than 92 of its former employees from Canada and the United States.The former workers named in the lawsuit allegedly forwarded documents regarding the certification process to Transport Canada and its U.S. counterpart, the Federal Aviation Administration. The process is essential to ensuring newly developed planes are given permission to fly.None of the allegations has been proven in court.last_img read more

Provincial government submits reference question to BC Court of Appeal

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first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. — Joined by Attorney General David Eby and Environment and Climate Change Minister George Heyman at a press conference Thursday morning, B.C. Premier John Horgan announced the details of the government’s reference question to the B.C. Court of Appeal about whether it has the right to limit the amount of oil and diluted bitumen being imported to the province.The reference question concerns provincial autonomy, particularly the rights of B.C. to regulate the environmental and economic impacts of heavy oils, like diluted bitumen, transported through the province. It was filed today in the B.C. Court of Appeal. For its reference, the B.C. government is asking the court to review proposed amendments to the Environmental Management Act that would give the Province authority to regulate impacts of heavy oils, like diluted bitumen, which, when released into the environment, would endanger human health, the environment and communities.“We have asked the courts to confirm B.C.’s powers within our jurisdiction to defend B.C.’s interests, so that there is clarity for today and for the generations to come,” said Horgan. “Our government will continue to stand up for the right to protect B.C.’s environment, economy and coast.”In January, the provincial government proposed a second phase of regulations to improve preparedness, response and recovery from potential spills. The regulations would apply to pipelines transporting any quantity of liquid petroleum products, as well as rail or truck operations transporting more than 10,000 litres of liquid petroleum products. The government said the proposed regulations would ensure geographically appropriate response plans, improve response times, ensure compensation for loss of public use of land and maximize the application of regulations to marine transport. “We have been clear from the outset that the appropriate way to resolve disagreements over jurisdiction is through the courts, not through threats or unlawful measures to target citizens of another province,” said Eby. “This reference question seeks to confirm the scope and extent of provincial powers to regulate environmental and economic risks related to heavy oils like diluted bitumen.”This will be the third reference question that B.C. has sent to court. The first was regarding the constitutionality of polygamy, and the second was related to third-party advertising in elections. The B.C. Court of Appeal is the highest court to which the Province can send a reference question.“Our government is working to protect our economy, environment and communities by making sure we have effective spills prevention, response and recovery in place,” said Heyman. “A single spill of diluted bitumen would put at risk tens of thousands of jobs across B.C. We have a responsibility to ensure that every measure to reduce risks is in place, and that those responsible for spills are held accountable for fixing any environmental damage they cause.”last_img read more

World Cup Semifinal Crib Notes Brazil vs Germany

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On Tuesday, Brazil and Germany kick off the World Cup semifinals, where there are no real party-crashers to be found. Including A Seleção and Die Mannschaft, four of the top five teams in the pre-Cup Elo ratings are still active in the tournament. Sorry, Spain.Brazil vs. Germany: 4 p.m. EDTIn BriefWith such evenly matched squads — and the ever-present specter of randomness — barring a huge blowout, the final four games of the World Cup are unlikely to provide much of a referendum on which side is truly the world’s best. But at the same time, the absence of a longshot entry boosts the chances that one of the remaining four teams is in fact the “true” best team in the field. More important, it also increases the odds that we’ll see a pair of exciting, close matches at the doorstep of the World Cup final.IN DEPTHBrazil was the World Cup favorite before the tournament began, and its championship chances still rank first according to the FiveThirtyEight model. Our official projections even say there’s a 73 percent probability that Brazil will beat Germany Tuesday and advance to the final. But those numbers don’t know that the gifted Brazilian striker Neymar will miss the rest of the tournament with a broken vertebra, an injury he sustained against Colombia in the quarterfinals. If we account for his absence (and that of his teammate Thiago Silva, who racked up two yellow cards and must sit out Tuesday’s match), Brazil’s chances of beating Germany drop to somewhere near 65 percent, numbers fueled in large part simply by the match’s location on Brazilian soil.To put it another way: If this game were staged at a neutral site, it would probably be close to a toss-up between Germany and Brazil-sans-Neymar-and-Silva.To a certain extent, that’s because Brazil has been far from dominant during its run to the semis. First, Mexico played it to a draw in the group phase, then it squeaked by Chile (on penalties) and Colombia in its knockout matches. Over the past month, the gap between Brazil’s Soccer Power Index (SPI) rating and that of second-ranked Argentina has been nearly sliced in half, despite the Argentines playing largely to expectation. That Brazil is still rated first in SPI owes as much to our prior beliefs about its strength as to anything it’s actually accomplished in the tournament.And Germany is a force to be reckoned with. While they haven’t consistently overwhelmed opponents with their ballyhooed offensive prowess (aside from netting six goals in their first two matches — including four against Portugal), the Germans have answered many of the defensive questions that surrounded them before the tournament began, keeping clean sheets against Portugal, the United States and France. And they’ll need to be staunch at that end of the pitch against a Brazilian team that still has plenty of firepower, even without Neymar.One major tactical storyline to keep an eye on will be the philosophical chess between the pass-heavy, possession-focused Germans and a Brazilian side still keenly interested in dribbling through the defense. Among semifinalist teams, only Argentina has maintained ball possession more often than Germany, and nobody makes more short passes per game than the Germans. Germany’s approach is to patiently work the ball into the opponent’s territory, passing it around until its players can create a high-percentage scoring opportunity. Brazil, on the other hand, loves to dribble the ball and create chances by taking on defenders in one-on-one situations.A compelling wrinkle will be how this changes without Neymar, Brazil’s most active dribbler. It’s likely that Hulk and Oscar will be asked to pick up some of the slack, but it will be interesting to see how Brazil adjusts its overall style in the absence of its most prolific offensive playmaker.On balance, Brazil should still be favored — if only because of home-field advantage. In close matches like this, officiating can play a sizable role, and there’s a good amount of research suggesting home teams get favorable treatment from the referees (perhaps more so in soccer than in other sports). In terms of ability, though, these two teams are very close to evenly matched.OFF THE PITCHBrazil and Germany have had good off-the-pitch relations for decades, particularly in the economic sphere. The Observatory of Economic Complexity has information on trade between the two countries that dates back to 1962, and shows that the two nations have been exchanging mostly the same stuff the whole time. Coffee, iron and soybeans were among the top Brazilian exports to Germany both in 1962 and in 2012.Similarly, machinery remains the top category of German exports to Brazil, although the specific products have changed over time. Metalworking and textile machinery reigned supreme in 1962, while cars and car parts took the largest shares of exports in 2012.But what’s most notable is how much these countries’ bilateral trade has grown. In 1962, Brazilian exports to Germany totaled $173 million and German exports to Brazil totaled $161 million. Trade in both directions surpassed the $1 billion mark in the 1970s, and was up to $11 billion in both directions in 2010, when both countries agreed to further strengthen their economic ties. Exports headed toward Germany have nearly doubled since, with $20 billion worth flowing out of Brazil in 2012. But it looks like Germany got the sweeter end of the deal, with Brazil buying $28 billion of its products the same year.FURTHER READINGIt’s a Huge Upset When All the World Cup Favorites WinHow Neymar’s Injury Affects Brazil’s Chances at the World Cup read more