Category: ziyevidg

Peebles accuses former associate of “anonymous and malicious” smear campaign

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first_imgDaniel Hoeg and Don Peebles (Daniel Hoeg, Gettty, iStock)Don Peebles is accusing one of his rivals of running a covert smear campaign against him.The Peebles Corporation head claims that former business associate Daniel Hoeg used untraceable Russian servers to send anonymous, defamatory emails to public officials who were reviewing Peebles’ real estate projects, according to a lawsuit filed Friday in state Supreme Court in Manhattan.“[Hoeg’s]’ campaign of anonymous and malicious emails has been and continues to be harassing and damaging to [Peebles’] business interests in ways that are difficult to measure and cannot be quantified at this time,” attorneys for Peebles wrote in their complaint.Hoeg’s company, the Hoeg Corporation, worked with Peebles in 2012 on the developer’s 346 Broadway condo conversion in Tribeca. The business relationship soured, however, as the two sides battled in court over how much Peebles owed Hoeg for the work done.ADVERTISEMENTPeebles claims public officials reviewing his projects across the country have been receiving defamatory emails from anonymous sources, and alleges that he was recently able to identify Hoeg as the sender.Hoeg signed his name in an email sent this past February to officials reviewing Peebles’ Angels Landing project in Downtown Los Angeles, according to the lawsuit.“Like many others before it, this email package also betrays numerous material matters concerning the Hoeg Defendants’ work for [The Peebles Corporation],” the lawsuit claims.Representatives for Hoeg and Peebles could not be immediately reached for comment.Peebles claims Hoeg violated their 2012 agreement by releasing confidential information, and is asking the court to issue an injunction preventing Hoeg from further breaching the agreement. Peebles is also asking the court to order Hoeg to reimburse him for legal fees.Contact Rich Bockmann Commercial Real Estatedon peeblesReal Estate Lawsuits Email Address* Full Name* Tagscenter_img Message* Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

USS Gerald R. Ford cable installation completed

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View post tag: USS Gerald R. Ford Authorities Huntington Ingalls completes cable installation on USS Gerald R. Ford The American shipbuilding company Huntington Ingalls Industries announced that shipbuilders at its Newport News Shipbuilding division recently completed the installation of more than 14 million feet (approx. 4,3 million meters) of electrical and fiber optic cable on the aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78).The company said that Gerald R. Ford’s design makes a significant leap to electrical power. With more than 10 million feet of electrical cable and 4 million of fiber optic cable, the ship’s electrical power replaces several legacy steam-powered systems onboard and brings extra electrical capacity to the ship for future technologies.Rolf Bartschi, Newport News’ vice president of CVN 78 carrier construction, said: “Ford’s increased electrical capacity makes this ship unique. Electrical systems take less manpower to operate and maintain, so in terms of costs, the shift toward electrical not only improves the flexibility of the ship’s technologies, it also reduces operating and maintenance costs during the carrier’s 50-year service life.”The Gerald R. Ford class’s design shifts away from steam power. The transition from steam to electrical power includes the carrier’s Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS), which contributes to a 33 percent increase in sortie generation rate compared to Nimitz-class carriers and steam catapults.The millions of feet of cable make up the carrier’s electrical distribution system. The system provides the ship with over 250 percent more electrical capacity than previous carriers.According to Huntington Ingalls Industries, this electrical capacity will help the ship load weapons and launch aircraft faster than older carriers. The increase in Gerald R. Ford’s fiber optic cables improves automations systems and data networks used by sailors onboard.[mappress mapid=”17594″] Back to overview,Home naval-today Huntington Ingalls completes cable installation on USS Gerald R. Ford January 18, 2016 View post tag: US Navy View post tag: Huntington Ingalls Industries Share this article read more

Drug education and rehabilitation

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first_imgDear Editor:The use of Naloxone can save a life. Naloxone, also known as Narcan is an opioid antagonist used in opioid overdoses to counteract the life-threatening depression of the respiratory system. It allows an overdose victim to breathe normally. Although traditionally administered by emergency response personnel, naloxone can be administered by lay people or public, making it ideal for treating heroin and other opioids overdoses. The training is simple and use of Naloxone results in a life saved. Here is what occurs in an opioid overdose. When too much of any opioid, like heroin goes into too many receptors, the respiratory system slows and the person breathes more slowly, then not at all.Because Naloxone basically knocks the opioids out of the opiate receptors in the brain, the overdose is reversed and the person is able to breathe again. However, it is a temporary drug that will wear off in 30-90 minutes and the person should be watched for signs of continued overdose. The overdose victim must seek medical assistance or call 911. Lack of oxygen from opioid overdose may lead to brain injury in as little as 4 minutes, yet the average EMS response time is 9.4 minutes. Seconds can count during an opioid overdose so it is vital if you have a loved one or friends who use, you need to have a plan in place. Most life threatening opioid emergencies occur in the home, witnessed by friends or family.Brand names of Naloxone are Evzio, Narcan injection, Narcan Nasal Spray. They all come with simple, lifesaving directions and are easy to administer. Upon purchase, read and know how to use these devices and keep them readily available. Some states have a third-party law where a concerned parent, employee or nurse at a school can obtain Naloxone and administer it without facing legal repercussions (known as the good Samaritan act). If you come in contact with a high-risk individual, you should have this lifesaving overdose antidote. For more information and the availability of naloxone,go to http://www.narcononnewliferetreat.org/blog/naloxone-availability.htmlIf you are in need of a referral to a treatment center, call us at 1- 800-431-1754.Ray Clausonlast_img read more

Policy paper: Medicines and Medical Devices Bill: overarching documents

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first_imgThe impact assessment evaluates the measures in the Medicines and Medical Devices Bill and gives an overarching assessment of the impact they will have.The illustrative statutory instruments accompany the Delegated Powers Memorandum. These are illustrative examples of how the powers in the bill may be used, and are not final drafts for consultation.The factsheets provide additional information on key areas of the Medicines and Medical Devices Bill.The document ‘how a medical device information system may work in practice’ relates to an amendment of the Medicines and Medical Devices Bill.last_img

Jack White To Release A Children’s Book Based Off The White Stripes’ “We’re Going To Be Friends”

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first_imgWhite Stripes’ guitarist Jack White will be releasing a book later this year via Third Man Books called We’re Going To Be Friends. With the help of illustrator Elinor Blake (who is also a musician, better known as April March, whose song “Chick Habit” was featured in Quentin Tarantino’s Death Proof), White has reimagined the White Stripes’ classic song “We’re Going To Be Friends,” which follows the innocent childhood friendship between the singer and a girl classmate named Suzy Lee, into a children’s book.Watch Nas And Jack White’s Modern Take On A 1920’s Blues SongJack White Personally Restored A Couch That Bob Dylan & Johnny Cash Once Sat OnWe’re Going To Be Friends will be released on November 7th, though the book is available for pre-order here now. Each copy of White’s book comes with a download card for the original White Stripes version of its title song, along with renditions by April March and The Woodstation Elementary School Singers. For a refresher on “We’re Going To Be Friends,” you can listen to The White Stripes’ original version of the track below, which was released on The White Stripes’ 2001 album, White Blood Cells.last_img read more

Students dedicate fall break to service in Appalachia

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first_imgSome Notre Dame students traveled to the mountains for fall break, but they dedicated their week to service rather than vacation time. These students were among over 250 participants in the semi-annual Appalachia seminar sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns (CSC). Cynthia Toms-Smedley, director of educational immersions at the CSC, said the seminar sends students to several sites across the Appalachia region to serve local communities. The program draws more students than any other CSC program, she said. “I think there’s a mix between the service aspect and getting to know community members in Appalachia, as well as an opportunity to have fun while doing service,” she said. “It’s an opportunity to learn about some of the challenges in Appalachia and to exercise our opportunity to serve people.” The CSC reviewed a record number of 272 applications for the fall trip, Smedley said. The seminar also sends students to the region over spring break. After students travel to Appalachia once, Smedley said many continue to volunteer with the program. “There are a lot of repeat students who are there for the third and fourth time,” she said. “They like to reconnect with the community they have served in the past.” Sophomore Bobby Alvarez spent his week at the Community Development Outreach Ministries (CDOM) in St. Albans, W. Va., and said he plans to return there in the future. “I want to go again, for the friendships I made, but also because the site I was working at was really an amazing site,” Alvarez said. “The people I worked with there were great.” At CDOM, Alvarez and 18 other Notre Dame students spent the mornings painting the community center. After lunch, the volunteers helped local children with their homework and played with them outside until dark. “A lot of the kids came from single parents or families involved with drugs and a lot have families that don’t really care about them,” Alvarez said. “The time at the community center and their time with us is a very special time for both them and us.” Alvarez said students who volunteer at CDOM frequently return because of the unique bonds they form with the children. Sophomore Colleen Duffy spent the week at the Hurley Community Development Center in Hurley, Va. Duffy said she applied to Appalachia to experience the cultural differences between that region and other parts of the country. “I wanted to do something more meaningful with my fall break than to go home and sit by myself,” she said. “I wanted to do something different.” During her first few days, Duffy said she built a porch and ramp on a trailer for a woman who was disabled in a car accident. “The woman was in rehab and was going to return soon, but she couldn’t get into her home,” she said. Duffy also worked at a local food bank with some of the 21 other volunteers who also traveled to Hurley. She said enjoyed meeting not only other Notre Dame students but also the community members. “Everyone from the community would just stop by the center and stop in to tell stories, and we’d always be there,” Duffy said. “By the end of the week, I felt like they were my family, and I wish I could go back.” Smedley said the seminar sends students to approximately 20 Appalachia sites, and each offers a different experience. “You can choose a site where you can get involved in education or in trail cleanup or work with people looking at sustainable agriculture,” Smedley said. Many of the sites have been part of the Appalachia program for decades, and Smedley said each must meet certain criteria to ensure that the volunteers can produce the maximum benefits. “For the centers, it’s an opportunity for students to be useful to the community and not to be a drain on their resources and capacity, but to serve in a way that is helpful,” she said. “And for our students, our hope is that they have an opportunity to get to know the community on a personal level.”last_img read more

Class travels to civil rights memorials over break

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first_imgFall Break is usually a time for students to return to normalcy: mom’s specialty dishes, catching up with neighborhood friends and copious amounts of sleeping. For English professor Stuart Greene’s freshman university seminar class, the week was filled with visitations to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the 16th Street Baptist Church and other historical sites in Alabama to engage in experiential learning for their course: “Memory, Memorials and Memorialization of the American Civil Rights Movement.” “I have never done this before, even though I have been teaching classes on the civil rights movement for nearly 10 years,” Greene said. “A colleague at Indiana University-South Bend inspired me who taught a class on the civil rights movement and spent two weeks traveling to Montgomery, Selma, Birmingham, Memphis, Nashville and other sites. He called the experience ‘Freedom Summer.’” Greene conducted a tremendous amount of research by looking at various guides and discussing with historians about which places to visit and which people the class should meet. “Everyone was incredibly generous with their time and willingness to spend time with my students and I,” Greene said. The class received funding from the College of Arts and Letters’ “Teaching Beyond the Classroom” program and from the First Year of Studies. Greene and the students covered approximately 20 percent of the cost for travel, lodging, food and admission fees to museums, institutes and churches. “It would have been great going home, but this is a once-in-a-lifetime experience going with your peers and a professor who is an expert on the subject,” said Bryce Parker, a student in the class. “I’m in college once and can go home another time “If we missed out on this experience, we would have asked why did I give this up just to go home? I don’t think any of us regret it.” Aliska Berry signed up for the course because of the mandatory Alabama trip. “It gave me a firsthand account to experience the Civil Rights Movement,” Berry said. “The trip made me learn about my ancestors, what they went through and why I’m here today. It was a humbling experience.” Austin Bosemer, whose favorite experience of the trip was walking through the streets of Selma, said the course has taken a social activism spin on its historical foundations. “I have gotten involved with Take 10, a volunteer program to mentor students in South Bend area schools,” Bosemer said. “Through this, I’m affecting social change in our community.” The students said their most memorable experience was meeting JoAnne Bland, a tour guide who guided the group through two churches in Selma. As a nine-year-old, Bland was a peaceful protestor scheduled to march from Selma to the state capital in Montgomery. However, armed officers carrying tear gas attacked the demonstrators at the Edmund Pettus Bridge, forbidding them from reaching Montgomery. The infamous day is commonly known as “Bloody Sunday.” “The march turned the national spotlight on Selma and the plight of minorities,” David Katter, another student in the class, said. “She has a lot of built-up rage over that event, which turned into a really moving trip as we walked through Selma with her. “She asked us, ‘I got you this far, what are you going to do?’ It was a really cool call to action.” The semester-long project of the class is to write a 15-page essay concerning the trip, how it affected the students, the importance of a chosen memorial and the importance of it. Some students, like Jas Smith, have created individual projects to complement their experiences. “I decided to make a website to educate children in the Selma area about the Pettus Bridge because a lot of them don’t know about it,” Smith said. “My project is to reform the teaching of history and show why these aspects of civil rights are important.” Beyond engaging in an experience hard to fully understand from reading history books, Greene said the students enjoyed themselves and came together a class. “The effect on us was great and it was a bonding experience for us all,” he said.last_img read more

He’s Back! Tom Suozzi Explores Race to Replace Rep. Steve Israel

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York An already congested Congressional contest just got more crowded as former Nassau County Executive Tom Suozzi became the latest candidate to join the growing ranks of those interested in succeeding Rep. Steve Israel, who rocked the Long Island political world earlier this month when he declared that he will not run for reelection this November.The 53-year-old Nassau Democrat, who served two terms as county executive after being Glen Cove mayor from 1994-2001, announced his intention to explore a run for New York’s 3rd Congressional District at a Tuesday morning event held at the Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury. A CPA and lawyer at the law firm of Harris Beach, Suozzi formally filed papers with the Federal Election Commission to form a fundraising committee, an initial step in the process.“Over the next month or two, I’m going to talk to people in the district, raise some money, really think it through with Helene and the kids and try to make the right decision,” Suozzi said.Come September he’ll have two kids in college and a son still in high school, so currently weighing on his and his wife Helene’s minds is that the commute to Washington, D.C., is longer than the one to Albany, which he considered making in 2006 before he lost a Democratic gubernatorial primary to then-Attorney General Eliot Spitzer.In 2009 Suozzi lost his race for a third term as county executive to then-Republican Legis. Ed Mangano, who beat the incumbent by 386 votes. Four years later, Suozzi ended up much further behind County Executive Mangano in a rematch, losing by 59-to-41 percent of the vote.“I know that people are sick of politicians and they’re sick of politics,” Suozzi tells the Press. “Going back into the arena is not an easy thing to do but I’m frustrated by what I see going on in politics these days and it’s got to be shaken up.”He took issue with the current campaign rhetoric coming from both the right and the left in the national discourse.“The Republicans are saying, ‘Let the marketplace take care of it. Let the rich continue to succeed and that will take care of everything,’ ” Suozzi complained. “And I don’t think it’s accurate what a lot of Democrats are saying, which is, ‘Let’s raise taxes on the rich.’ It’s not as simple as that….I want to work together with other people to actually solve real problems that face the people who live in the Third Congressional District.”At this early stage Suozzi is arguably the front-runner from his side of the aisle since he’s the only Democratic elected official to win county-wide office twice. The district stretches from northern Queens to Suffolk’s Huntington Town but its largest bulk includes Nassau’s Gold Coast.At this point, a dozen Democrats have expressed varying degrees of interest, and they’re all scheduled to meet Wednesday with Nassau Democratic Chairman Jay Jacobs and other party leaders in Glen Cove. Among the contenders are Nassau Interim Finance Authority Chairman Jon Kaiman, former North Hempstead Supervisor; Suffolk Legis. Steve Sterns (D-Dix Hills), who’s term-limited; North Hempstead Town board member Anna Kaplan; Brad Gerstman, a lobbyist; Assemb. Charles Lavine (D-Glen Cove); Robert Zimmerman, a Democratic National Committee member, who co-runs a public relations firm; Suffolk Legis. Dr. William Spencer (D-Huntington); Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone; former Suffolk Legis. Jon Cooper; Todd Richman, a Great Neck businessman and philanthropist; and Laurie Scheinman, a psychologist and philanthropist from Port Washington.Rep. Steve Israel won’t run again this fall because he wants to spend more time writing novels and eating in diners, or so he says.Interest is also heating up on the Republican side. At this early stage the contenders are State Sen. Sen. Jack Martins (R-Old Westbury), the former mayor of Mineola; Suffolk Legis. Robert Trotta (R-Fort Salonga); Assemb. Chad Lupinacci (R-Huntington Station); and David Gurfein, a former Marine and currently president of a health & wellness business.“Jack’s all in, no question about it,” says E. O’Brien Murray, a campaign strategist for State Sen. Jack Martins, in a phone interview with the Press. “He’s definitely running.”Although Murray says he’s sure that Nassau Republicans will eventually come around to regard the former mayor of Mineola as their best candidate for the congressional seat, he was quick to criticize the former Nassau County Executive.“This is the same Tom Suozzi who brought us corruption in his first term, created the energy tax in his second term, and raised taxes 20 percent,” says Martins’ Republican spokesman. “The voters threw him out once and overwhelmingly rejected him the second time when he tried to come back.”Rep. Steve Israel, a former Huntington Town council member, was first elected to Congress in 2000 when the district included more of Suffolk than it does now after it was redrawn. For two terms Israel served as chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. He resigned that post following the brutal drubbing of Democrats in the 2014 mid-term elections, which included the defeat of Rep. Tim Bishop, who had represented the East End of Long Island in the 1st Congressional District but lost to then-State Sen. Lee Zeldin. Until Israel made his announcement two weeks ago, the race for Zeldin’s Congressional seat was the only one on Long Island drawing attention—and money—considering that Republicans hold a 30-seat majority in the House of Representatives and this district was considered a toss-up. Vying to run against Zeldin are Democrats Anna Throne-Holst, the former Southold Supervisor, and David Calone, the former Suffolk County planner and investor.Now Long Island has two hot Congressional races with national implications in 2016 when the White House is also up for grabs.last_img read more

‘We get to keep our Social Security and our Medicare’

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first_img– Advertisement – While many in the media class are giving a lot of airtime to middle-of-the-road and conservative BS about President-elect Joe Biden’s need to be … a Republican(?), the joy being felt across the country is not simply the result of ending the Donald Trump nightmare. It’s about righting a ship the Republican Party has directed away from the majority of American citizens’ needs. But it’s also about pointing that ship, sinking under the weight of conservative greed, in a direction that promises to protect more Americans, not less.An example of what this victory for the Democratic Party, its policies, and ideology means to Americans can be seen viscerally in a TikTok video posted by Amelia Cody. In it, her mother watches as Pennsylvania is finally called for Joe Biden. “I’m so happy,” she weeps, and when asked why she explains that “We get to keep our Social Security and our Medicare, Amy. Thank you, sweet Jesus.” This isn’t about some existential bogus threat that the Democratic Party is going to come and steal your guns, or not allow you to have a Christmas tree in your living room. It’s about Republican policy, going back well before Donald Trump came into power, that wants to raid Social Security and Medicare in order to filter more and more money to the party’s wealthiest overlords.- Advertisement – A-Cody.jpglast_img read more

Iron Leung

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first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img