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Weber State Men’s Basketball Hosts San Diego Thursday

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first_img Tags: San Diego Men’s Basketball/Weber State Men’s Basketball Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailOGDEN, Utah-Coming off of an 89-34 loss at Utah State last Friday, Weber State men’s basketball (0-1) seeks to right the ship by hosting the San Diego Toreros (1-2) of the West Coast Conference for their home opener at the Dee Events Center Thursday.The Wildcats are 51-6 (.895) all-time in home openers.Weber State head coach Randy Rahe, currently in his 15th season at the helm in Ogden, is 266-154 (.633) in leading the Wildcats’ program.In losing to the Aggies Friday, senior guard Jerrick Harding, out with a foot injury, was sorely missed. By virtue of their 34 points at Utah State, the Wildcats are tied with Syracuse for last place nationally.In Harding’s absence, sophomore Lithuanian national Donatas Kupsas posted 10 points and 6 rebounds.Defensively, the Wildcats rank 339th out of 347 teams nationally by giving up 89 points per contest.Against the Aggies, Ukrainian national Dima Zdor had two blocks to pace the Wildcats defensively.San Diego is coached by Sam Scholl who is 22-17 (.564) in his second season with the Toreros. San Diego snapped a 2-game losing streak by defeating Fresno State Tuesday 72-66. The Toreros’ losses on the season have been to UC Irvine (73-76) in the season opener and Long Beach State (62-74).The Toreros rank 240th nationally by scoring 69 points per game.Redshirt sophomore guard Joey Calcaterra posts 17.7 points per game as the Toreros’ leading scorer on the season thus far.Redshirt junior guard Braun Hartfield (13.3 points, 7 rebounds per game) is San Diego’s overall statistical leader. Hartfield also paces the Toreros’ defense with three blocks and 12 defensive rebounds. Junior forward James Jean-Marie averages a team-best 8.3 rebounds for San Diego.Defensively, San Diego gives up 72 points per game, tying them for 223rd nationally with Southern Utah, Cal State Bakersfield and Jacksonville.This is the sixth time in history the Wildcats and Toreros are meeting on the hardwood with Weber State leading the all-time series 3-2. November 13, 2019 /Sports News – Local Weber State Men’s Basketball Hosts San Diego Thursday Brad Jameslast_img read more

Cassidian Optronics Upgrades Mission Effectiveness of Colombian Navy’s Subs

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first_img View post tag: Subs View post tag: Cassidian Back to overview,Home naval-today Cassidian Optronics Upgrades Mission Effectiveness of Colombian Navy’s Subs View post tag: Colombian Cassidian Optronics is improving the mission effectiveness of the 209 class submarines of the Colombian Navy by installing state-of-the-art sighting systems. After the already ordered refurbishment of an attack periscope, the Colombian Navy has now ordered a SERO 250 search periscope from Cassidian Optronics for a 209 Class submarine.Cassidian Optronics is the well-known producer of optronic mast systems and periscopes for submarines, formerly known as Carl Zeiss Optronics.This contract is the first in a series of contracts aimed at the final replacement of all current optical systems on board the existing Class 209 submarines of the Colombian Navy. These submarines were commissioned in 1975 and are now in an overhaul and upgrade phase. The current programme is under contract to the German shipbuilding company HDW in Kiel. Cassidian Optronics’ SERO 250 was chosen because it is a modern and cost effective plug-in solution replacing older periscopes without having to make major modifications to the boat.One of the main criteria for a periscope upgrade in submarines is the increase in capabilities. The SERO 250 periscope is equipped with state-of-the-art sensors. These include a new generation infrared sensor, offering the crew a night vision capability. It was specifically designed for the submarine refit market to replace legacy systems with minimal platform adaptation. In the integration process local partners in Columbia will be involved.Previously, Cassidian Optronics won different programmes within the retrofit market, including the upgrade programme of the Turkish Navy’s AY-Class submarines.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, March 20, 2013; Image: Cassidian View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navy View post tag: Mission View post tag: Effectivenesscenter_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: Optronics Cassidian Optronics Upgrades Mission Effectiveness of Colombian Navy’s Subs Equipment & technology March 20, 2013 View post tag: Upgrades Share this articlelast_img read more

Home births could save NHS millions

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first_imgEncouraging home births could save the NHS millions of pounds a year, an Oxford University study has shown.The findings, published in the British Medical Journal, studied 60,000 women over two years, all of whom were deemed to have “low risk” pregnancies.  Participants in the study included both women who had given birth before and those who had not, and researchers showed that on average it was £300 cheaper for a woman to give birth at her own home than in a hospital.The research took into account NHS costs linked to the actual birth, including the cost of midwife care whilst labour is occurring and after birth, medical care, pain relief and procedures required in hospital should anything go wrong. It did not, however, take into account the cost of caring for a baby suffering from birth injuries, a major factor in determining childbirth costs as babies born at home were found to be three times more likely to suffer from such injuries.Currently only 2.5% of women give birth at home, but Liz Schroder, a co-author of the study, hopes that the findings may encourage them “to request an ‘out of hospital’ birth” and that “the potential for cost savings could make offering women more choice an attractive option for the NHS”.Others believe that this research will be a wake-up the government, at a time when NHS cuts are being fiercely debated. Louise Silverton, deputy general secretary of the Royal College of Midwives said, “This underlines the need to make a fundamental change in the way we deliver maternity services in this country.” She added that the government is asking for “more for less” and that the research is a “shining example” of how it can be delivered.However, the findings have failed to convince everybody. Camilla Tomney, writing in The Express, claimed that the study is a classic example of women being made to feel inadequate when they wish to “defy Mother Nature”, even if they “are doing what they believe is best for their babies”.Students at Oxford have also questioned the findings. One first year medic commented, “Home births are always dangerous.” Another stated that the NHS is not about simply “saving money, but saving lives.”last_img read more

Evansville Police Department Police Pension Board

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first_imgThe Evansville Police Department Police Pension Board will hold an Executive Session on Friday May 26, 2017 at 8:15 a.m.  The Meeting will be held in the Room 307 of the Civic Center Plaza.The Executive Session is to be closed as provided by:I.C. 5-14-1.5-6.1(7) For discussion of records classified as confidential by state or federal statute.Immediately following the Executive Session, a regular Open Session will be held in Room 307of the Civic Center Plaza.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img

Gail Riecken to have press conference on Evansville’s future convention hotel.

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first_imgA first class hotel the people of Evansville can afford would be a big boost for downtown Evansville. A first class hotel is what we the taxpayers were sold. A first class hotel is what the city of Evansville deserves. Unfortunately, the hotel we are getting is neither first class nor affordable.WHO: Mayoral Candidate Gail RieckenWHERE: 401 SE 6th Street, Suite 200 EvansvilleWHEN: September 3, 2015, 2:00 P.M.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img

Pecan Deluxe Candy

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first_imgPecan Deluxe Candy (Leeds, West Yorkshire) is set to launch a range of new nut and seed coatings. The move coincides with further investment at its Yorkshire factory, which includes investment in ’traditional style’ cooling tables for nut products, such as brittles.Pecan’s new coatings, include basil & garlic pine nuts, pumpkin seeds, glazed sunflower seeds, kettle cooked sunflower seeds and macadamia nuts, fiesta pecans, frosted pumpkin and sunflower seeds, garlic pistachio, teriyaki cashews and jerk almonds.last_img

Widespread Panic Covers Funkadelic For Bernie Worrell, Busts Out Houser-Era Song At Red Rocks

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first_imgWidespread Panic settled in to Red Rocks Amphitheatre last night, playing the first of three sold-out shows at the historic venue. Red Rocks is celebrating their 75th anniversary in 2016, and the band that has sold it out the most is Panic. It’s always a special occasion when WSP meets RRX.The show opened strong with “Ain’t Life Grand” and a “Happy” that worked into “Airplane,” “Take~Off Jam,” “Rebirtha” and “Chunk of Coal.” The show really heated up in the second set, especially when the band busted out the song “You Got Yours.” Last played at Red Rocks on 6/29/02, this was the first-ever performance of the song with Jimmy Herring at the storied venue. The Mikey Houser-era jam was loved by all, and got the set grooving along nicely. The band also covered Funkadelic’s “Red Hot Mama,” paying tribute to the keyboardist Bernie Worrell who had passed away earlier that day.Panic’s tribute to two late musicians, Mikey Houser and Bernie Worrell, served to honor the true passion of performing at Red Rocks. With two more nights to come, you can expect some plenty of magic from Widespread Panic.Check out the PanicStream setlist below.Setlist: Widespread Panic at Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Morrison, CO – 6/24/16Set 1: Ain’t Life Grand, Happy > Airplane > Take~Off Jam > Rebirtha > Chunk of Coal, Contentment Blues, Steven’s Cat, Space Wrangler, Radio Child (60 mins)Set 2: For What It’s Worth, Pigeons > You Got Yours* > Good People > Dyin’ Man, Cotton Was King > Cotton Jam > Protein Drink > Drumz > Drumz & Bass > Sewing Machine, Climb To Safety, Red Hot Mama (89 mins)Encore: 1 x 1 > Action ManNotes Entire show with Mrs Edie Jackson on stage / * LTP at RR 6.29.02 with M Houserlast_img read more

Widespread Panic Shares “New Years Compilation” Highlighting Past NYE Celebrations

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first_imgWith New Year’s fast approaching, Widespread Panic has culled highlights from their last few end-of-the-year celebrations for fans everywhere! Much like their recent Halloween Compilation, the New Years Compilation takes songs from the last ten years and conveniently puts them into one glorious playlist on LiveWidespreadPanic.The playlist features a number of Panic originals, but also digs deep into their arsenal of great covers. Bob Dylan’s “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” and Stevie Wonder’s “I Wish” serve as the first two songs on the list, but covers of Van Morrison, Bill Withers, The Beatles, Talking Heads and more are all featured!You can see the full playlist with original performance date below, and head here to download!A Hard Rains A-Gonna Fall 12/31/2015 Atlanta, GAI Wish 12/31/2009 Atlanta, GALove and Happiness 12/31/2011 Charlotte, NCDevil in Disguise 12/31/2013 Atlanta, GAOn Your Way Down 12/31/2011 Charlotte, NCFirst We Take Manhattan 12/31/2015 Atlanta, GAMoondance 12/31/2009 Atlanta, GATail Dragger 12/31/2011 Charlotte, NCTime Fades Away 12/31/2013 Atlanta, GALean on Me 12/31/2014 Charlotte, NCAint No Sunshine When Shes Gone 12/31/2014 Charlotte, NCWanna Be Startin Something 12/31/2009 Atlanta, GAWith a Little Help from my Friends 12/31/2014 Charlotte, NCTounge (Shuffle in A) 12/31/2010 Denver, COMidnight Special 12/31/2012 Charlotte, NCHallelujah 12/31/2015 Atlanta, GAUp All Night 12/31/2007 Atlanta, GAWalking After Midnight 12/31/2009 Atlanta, GAAs Time Goes By 12/31/2008 Denver, COI Can’t Stop Loving You 12/31/2006 Atlanta, GABurning Down the House 12/31/2013 Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Stigma of opioids a hurdle to solving crisis

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first_img Two universities launch partnerships to boost Detroit opportunity, reduce opioid crisis “Can you think of all the tax dollars it’s cost for you to go to detox?” the doctor asked Raina McMahan when she arrived at the clinic in Revere seeking help for her 15-year heroin addiction. “What is the matter with you?”McMahan, now six years into her recovery and a certified recovery coach at Massachusetts General Hospital, told the story of her addiction and of the scorn and discrimination she faced, which discouraged her from getting treatment — a dynamic that authorities said Thursday still presents one of the biggest hurdles to fighting the nation’s deadly opioid crisis.“Stigma is a formidable barrier. Our country has ostracized, punished, and in some cases, even criminalized addiction,” said Michelle Williams, dean of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “And that has led people who know that they need help … to avoiding asking for that help. Even when they do work up the courage to go in and seek that medical care, there’s no guarantee that that courage will be met with the appropriate response.”Despite being chastised, McMahan wanted help badly enough to keep seeing the doctor, until he misadministered an otherwise effective drug used to treat opioid dependency and explained her subsequent sickness as evidence that she was allergic to the drug — a fiction she carried with her for years afterward. McMahon would go in and out of treatment many times before stepping onto the recovery path she walks today.“Stigma is a formidable barrier. Our country has ostracized, punished, and in some cases, even criminalized addiction,” said Michelle Williams, dean of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Lisa Abitbol/Harvard Chan SchoolMcMahan and Williams spoke Thursday at an all-day conference called “Stigma and Access to Treatment: The Harvard University and University of Michigan Summit on the Opioid Crisis,” which brought experts from the two host universities, other academic institutions, law enforcement, and government to the Joseph Martin Conference Center on Harvard’s Longwood Campus in Boston.Though overdose deaths appear to be plateauing nationally, they still account for the loss of an estimated 70,000 lives annually. The cultural stigma is counterproductive in two ways, speakers said. It makes users feel weak and unworthy, undermining any motivation to control their drug use. Most troubling, perhaps, is evidence that the attitude extends into the health care system, where negative experiences like McMahan’s are repeated across the country.The bright side, panelists said, is that if users manage to bring themselves forward, medication-assisted treatment with methadone, buprenorphine, and naloxone has proven both effective and straightforward.The summit was the second of two planned as part of a unique collaboration between Harvard and Michigan that seeks solutions to two of society’s most intractable problems: the opioid crisis and stagnant economic opportunities in struggling areas, particularly in Detroit.,The collaboration was born out of an agreement between Harvard President Larry Bacow and University of Michigan President Mark Schlissel. The event featured panel discussions on stigma and access to treatment, law enforcement and punishment, policy and financing solutions, and presentations from people like McMahan, who provided distinctive points of view of the epidemic.Bacow said the conference was what he and Schlissel had in mind when they conceived the collaboration, which took an interdisciplinary approach that brought together professors from different fields with professionals working on various aspects of the crisis.“These problems are systems problems. They’re not solved by any one discipline,” Bacow said.Institutions like Harvard, Bacow said, can help by offering academic expertise and by wielding convening power to bring together people from different backgrounds.“In the end institutions like this exist to make the world a better place,” Bacow said.Mary Bassett, the FXB Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights and head of the Chan School’s FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, joined with University of Michigan Associate Professor of Anesthesiology Chad Brummett, the event’s organizer, to discuss how much more could be done with existing tools if the barriers to treatment could be lowered.“We have the tools to stem the tide,” Bassett said. “We need everyone to tackle the opioid epidemic.”Richard Frank, the Margaret T. Morris Professor of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School, said that only 10 to 25 percent of people with an opioid problem are being treated, and just 35 percent of those in treatment get therapy that is likely to make them better. Of those, 40 percent stick with the treatment for a year.,What those numbers mean, Frank said, is that a mere 3.5 percent of those who need it are getting help that is likely to help them recover. Frank argued that one solution is for states to update their licensing requirements so that health care organizations operating under standards adopted in the 1970s begin offering therapies that reflect modern science.Speakers traced stigma and discrimination around opioids to America’s tortured history of race relations. Their association with poverty and minority communities prompted a response focused on criminalization, rather than public health. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, professor of history, race, and public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Suzanne Young Murray Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, traced that directly to political strategies of President Richard Nixon.Experts agreed that today’s response — despite the need for improvement — is much better than in decades past. Howard Koh, Harvey V. Fineberg Professor of the Practice of Public Health Leadership and former assistant secretary for health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, said the transformation of law enforcement’s response from one that was largely punitive to one that seeks to get people into treatment is not only impressive but an example of the change still needed in the health care industry.Koh pointed out that settlements from lawsuits against opioid manufacturers are a potential source of money for treatment, but he cautioned policymakers not to let funds be diverted to unrelated purposes, as occurred with the massive tobacco settlements two decades ago. Then, public health officials thought there would be enough resources to transform the industry, only to be disappointed.Koh told of a former opioid user who spoke at a similar gathering and thanked the health care workers who helped when she needed it, saying, “You believed in me even when I didn’t believe in myself.”“People wrestling with substance use disorder need us to believe in them and build a system to help them get there,” Koh said. Harvard, U. of Michigan to tackle social ills Summit to take wide-ranging look at factors of race, stigma, policy, and the lived experience of patients center_img Specialists take on opioid crisis Relatedlast_img read more

Second Women’s March 2020 held in South Bend to honor life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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first_imgCourtesy of Jennifer VanderVeen Pat Hackett, candidate for Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District seat, spoke at a Women’s March held in South Bend Saturday.Despite only having three weeks to assemble the rally, VanderVeen said she was inspired to rise to the challenge due to her desire for political change and Ginsburg’s death.“I was losing a lot of sleep right after Justice Ginsburg passed, and it really did rattle all of us in the legal community when she passed,” VanderVeen said. “I am just coming off of board service on a national organization, so it was just kind of the right time, I felt, for me to jump up and do something and be politically active.”VanderVeen said she hoped the rally encouraged people to vote.“I really do feel that part of what happened in 2016 was voter turnout, because everyone saw the polls and thought we all knew what was going to happen. And I think people stayed at home or people voted third party, and that that led to the situation we’re currently in,”  VanderVeen said. “It was really just trying to get people to realize that every vote does count. And that even though Indiana is so solidly red, if everyone voted, that could change.”Several rally attendees carried signs decrying Trump’s move to replace Ginsburg with Barrett. Though Republicans have defended that choice by highlighting the fact that Barrett is a woman, Pat Hackett, a Democrat running for election to the House to represent Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District, gave a speech stating that Barrett’s gender alone does not qualify her for the job, as her “patriarchal perspective” and judicial record indicates an opposition to issues like abortion rights and LGBTQ marriage rights.“Let’s be clear, the fact that this is a woman being appointed to the Supreme Court doesn’t make a difference because the agenda is the same,” Hackett said.For VanderVeen, however, one of the main issues behind Coney Barrett’s nomination is not the person, but rather the context.“It wasn’t about her. It was about the process,” VanderVeen said. “It’s about the fact that a group of senators who stalled a nomination four years ago, all of whom gave lengthy quotes at that time defending themselves and saying, ‘If this happens again, in four years, you can quote us on it,’ are now turning around and doing this. That is really what most people are galvanized around. I think it would be happening, almost no matter who [Trump] put up.”With the presidential election taking place in only 17 days, VanderVeen had a message to the women of the Notre Dame community: Go vote.“Many of you are going to be voting in your first presidential election,” VanderVeen said. “It’s not a privilege to be taken lightly. If you go back and look at the history of women’s suffrage in this country and what women went through to secure that right for us to vote, it’s incumbent upon all of us to do that every time and exercise that right because of how hard they fought for us to have it.”In previous years, students from the tri-campus community have attended the Women’s March in Washington, D.C in January. However, with the ongoing pandemic and recent spike in COVID-19 cases, junior Cate Prather, the executive planner for the Women’s March 2020, said it was unlikely the group would be able to participate.“With anything going on in the world outside and on campus, the safety of the community in our participants are at the forefront of our mind,” Prather said. “It’s looking like right now it is likely not going to happen due to the concern about bringing an outbreak back or getting the help of our participants.”Nevertheless, Prather praised the Women’s March organization and their aim to give women a voice through a protest that has gained traction throughout the nation — an ideal that has ignited inspiration within students.“I think that marches like the Women’s March and ideas that are nationalized, and communicated through media outlets are able to reach back even here to South Bend in the Midwest and students are able to feel invigorated and inspired by all these people who they stand in solidarity with to be able to create action here on campus,” Prather said.To illustrate her point, Prather said that the experience of attending the D.C. Women’s March in 2019 served to inspire her to voice her beliefs on campus.“It certainly has empowered me to come back to Notre Dame to stand up for and use my voice more for issues that I care about knowing that I have a vast network of support around,” Prather saidStudent body vice president, senior Sarah Galbenski, echoed Prather’s beliefs on the march’s inspirational effects, noting that the movement’s strength “derives from its intersectionality.”“Especially in light of our country’s well overdue reckoning with racial injustice, the women’s rights movement must strive to be intersectional and fight for the freedoms of all women regardless of race, sexual orientation or socioeconomic status,” Galbenski said.Though to some the Women’s March movement has been equated to a specific set of beliefs, Prather said that, just like women from across the world, participants have different opinions and beliefs.“There’s certainly a strong movement for pro-choice … with how people interpret women’s rights and women’s reproductive rights,” Prather said. “But there are also people there who are pro-life and pro-women. And there’s a way for that to intersect in this march, and there’s a way to find common ground and to help support women in general. It certainly takes both sides to reach an agreement and to reach what hopefully will be a better way forward in the future.”Tags: Amy Coney Barrett, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Women’s March For the past three years, millions — typically clad in pink hats — have taken to the streets in support of the women’s rights movement in January. But this year, the Women’s March organization decided to host a second protest on Oct. 17.While the first Women’s March was held the day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration in 2017, this year’s Saturday’s march was organized to both honor late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s legacy and to oppose Trump’s choice to replace her with former Notre Dame law professor, Judge Amy Coney Barrett.“We’re holding socially distant actions across the country to send an unmistakable message about the fierce opposition to Trump and his agenda, including his attempt to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat,”  the Women’s March website said.As a result, 425 demonstrations took place across the nation. In Washington, D.C., protestors marched from Freedom Plaza to the National Mall. In South Bend, some 200 people — including former Notre Dame women’s basketball coach Muffet McGraw and former South Bend mayor Pete Buttigieg’s mother Anne Montgomery — congregated in Howard Park in a rally organized by local attorney Jennifer VanderVeen.Participants wore masks — some even emblazoned with colorful words such as “Vote!” — and spread out across the park’s festival area.“I thought we had a good turnout — especially considering the fact that our COVID numbers are up in the area — and we still had people who were willing to come out,” VanderVeen said.last_img read more