Category: mytdrrsk

Mixing and transformation in a deep western boundary current: A case study

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first_imgWater-mass transformation by turbulent mixing is a key part of the deep-ocean overturning, as it drives the upwelling of dense waters formed at high latitudes. Here, we quantify this transformation and its underpinning processes in a small Southern Ocean basin: the Orkney Deep. Observations reveal a focussing of the transport in density space as a deep western boundary current (DWBC) flows through the region, associated with lightening and densification of the current’s denser and lighter layers, respectively. These transformations are driven by vigorous turbulent mixing. Comparing this transformation with measurements of the rate of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation indicates that, within the DWBC, turbulence operates with a high mixing efficiency, characterized by a dissipation ratio of 0.6 to 1 that exceeds the common value of 0.2. This result is corroborated by estimates of the dissipation ratio from microstructure observations. The causes of the transformation are unravelled through a decomposition into contributions dependent on the gradients in density space of the: dianeutral mixing rate, isoneutral area, and stratification. The transformation is found to be primarily driven by strong turbulence acting on an abrupt transition from the weakly-stratified bottom boundary layer to well-stratified off-boundary waters. The reduced boundary-layer stratification is generated by a downslope Ekman flow associated with the DWBC’s flow along sloping topography, and is further regulated by submesoscale instabilities acting to re-stratify near-boundary waters. Our results provide observational evidence endorsing the importance of near-boundary mixing processes to deep-ocean overturning, and highlight the role of DWBCs as hot spots of dianeutral upwelling.last_img read more

EDITORIAL: CITY COUNTY OBSERVER SOUNDS THE ALARM ABOUT THE RAMIFICATION G-2016-21.

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first_imgThe City-County Observer’s staff was alerted by a passing comment made by Dr. H. Dan Adams at Monday’s City Council meeting that something “hush-hush” may be afoot.  When the Good Doctor asked his fellow Councilors to carefully read the material in their packets concerning Ordinance G-2016-21, which is sponsored by Councilmen Mosby, Weaver, and McGinn, our curiosity was piqued.  It was no small feat to track down the proposed ordinance, and after days we finally got a copy.  Attached below is the link of Ordinance G-2016-21 link for your review.Ordinance G-2016-21Please note that the words stricken from the original  ordinance have lines through them and the underlined words are the ones to be added to it.Much of the rest of the proposed ordinance is devoted to putting numerous limitations on allowing citizens to ask questions or speak to Council concerning matters that come before it.  We believe this dances around the edges of infringing the First Amendment rights of Evansvillians.  We understand that there is a practical need to limit speaking time in instances when an item is controversial, but holding the option of refusing to hear the voice of the people being regulated is NOT in the best interest of the public.We are concerned that transparency and accountability are being sacrificed to “efficiency and collaboration.” There are more and more items unanimously passed by Council without discussion and/or dissent.   The banning of obscene language, vulgar behavior, and use of signs and posters is understandable.  Muzzling the people who elected them to serve is NOT understandable.  We hope that the mainstream media will join us in calling for the restoration of citizen participation in government, now that we have sounded the alarm about the ramifications of G-2016-21.  We can’t wait to read  our readers comments concerning the amending of city ordinance G-2016-21.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Press release: UK commits to international partnerships to meet shared challenges and drive growth

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first_imgInternational Research and Innovation Strategy launched to ensure the UK remains a global leader in science £4 million funding competitions to help pioneers get their new innovations to market addressing the Global Innovation Summit in Manchester, Science Minister underlines the importance of international science collaboration, as part of our modern Industrial Strategy The UK’s record levels of foreign investment are sustained by our reputation as a world leader in technology and innovation. Today’s announcement will ensure the UK and UK businesses remain on the forefront of cutting-edge innovation and we retain our status among global investors as the top destination for investment in Europe. UK Research and Innovation welcomes the publication of the International Research and Innovation Strategy, which emphasises the importance of global collaboration to the research and innovation sector. Working with international partners is essential for addressing major global and societal challenges, while also helping to deliver economic impact and enhance quality of life across the UK. In future, our businesses won’t just be entering new markets – they’ll be making them. We are living through enormous technological, social and environmental change. Science and innovation have no borders, and this new Strategy reflects our aspirations to see the UK draw systemically on research and innovation collaboration to build its economic growth while tackling global challenges. We’ve already backed this ambition by committing £7 billion over 5 years by 2022. The success of British businesses and research organisations shows our international influence when it comes to collaboration, demonstrating our commitment to the challenges that we all share. At the heart of these projects is building business relationships whilst developing new technologies such as artificial intelligence, quantum technologies and using technology in healthcare to improve life chances.Graham Stuart, Minister for Investment, said: GlobalStars call with Singapore (£1 million) – GlobalStars funding competition between Singapore, the Netherlands and UK – focused on medical technology, smart mobility and logistics and advanced manufacturing Smart Manufacturing Cluster call (£2 million) – applicants are invited to submit R&D&I project proposals in the area of Advanced Manufacturing applications and technologies Artificial Intelligence and Quantum (£1 million) – collaboration between Austria, Belgium, Canada, Israel, Denmark, Spain, Switzerland, South Korea, Turkey and the UK UKRI Chief Executive, Professor Sir Mark Walport, said:center_img Read the UK International Research and Innovation Strategy Future international research and innovation collaborations between our people, our organisations and institutions, and our innovative businesses are vital to the UK’s future prosperity, the UK’s Science Minister Chris Skidmore said today (14 May).Addressing the EUREKA Global Innovation Summit, in Manchester, the Minister announced the publication of the UK’s new International Research and Innovation Strategy. It underlines the UK’s commitment to worldwide partnerships, as part of the modern Industrial Strategy ambition to make sure the UK remains a world leader in emerging technologies.Science Minister Chris Skidmore said: The UK is determined to remain a global leader in science, research and innovation and aim to boost investment to 2.4% of GDP in R&D, the biggest ever increase, through our modern Industrial Strategy.He announced a £4 million funding competition for UK participation in EUREKA projects that aim to get innovations to market quicker and other projects designed to boost networking amongst innovators and businesses.The competitions are: The Eureka Global Innovation Summit is the flagship event of the UK Chairmanship of EUREKA, hosted by Innovate UK, where more than 1700 business people and innovators from 65 countries meet to exchange ideas and develop new ways of working to encourage global economic growth. This latest announcement comes as part of a series of speeches from the Science Minister on the ambition to boost R&D spending to 2.4% by 2027 and follows earlier commitments to international science. In January, the government announced 28 UK-led international partnerships, backed by £279 million of government investment through the modern Industrial Strategy. The Fund for International Collaboration research projects has been set up to tackle some of the world’s biggest challenges – from developing the next generation of eco-friendly packaging, to using the latest technology in AI to improve the lives of millions suffering from dementia.last_img read more

Nairn’s opens £6.5m gluten-free factory in Midlothian

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first_imgEdinburgh-based oatcake and biscuit manufacturer Nairn’s Oatcakes has opened its new gluten-free manufacturing operation in Newtongrange, Midlothian following an investment of more than £6.5m.The expansion is a response to growing consumer demand for Nairn’s gluten-free products, resulting in the existing gluten-free sites such as Craigmillar, Edinburgh reaching capacity.The company has said the new factory will “enhance and support Nairn’s future, allowing it to satisfy demand for its current range, whilst increasing capacity for a significant NPD pipeline to be developed”.Martyn Gray, managing director at Nairn’s Oatcakes, said production at its current site had reached a ceiling, with limited scope for growth.“With investment in larger-scale premises and plant, we now have both the capacity and competitive cost profile, associated with greater automation, to secure and develop the long-term future of Nairn’s.”Its long-term banking partner HSBC has provided the funding for the investment. HSBC said it was “more than happy to fund Nairn’s new manufacturing site and support the business’ ambitions to expand”.Nairn’s has also announced the rollout of larger pack sizes for its gluten-free oatcakes and the introduction of new children’s gluten-free products called Astro Bites.last_img read more

Members Of Dopapod, Eric Krasno Band Added To Turkuaz Supergroup With Snarky Puppy, Nth Power Members

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first_imgThis Thursday, members of Turkuaz, Snarky Puppy, Allen Stone, The Nth Power, RAQ and more will team up for a proper birthday rager at The Hall at MP in Brooklyn in honor of Turkuaz drummer Michelangelo Carubba’s birthday. Mikey is bringing out a huge roster of friends to help him celebrate, including Robert “Sput” Searight (Snarky Puppy), Steve Watkins (Allen Stone, Juno What), Nate Edgar (Nth Power), Craig Brodhead (Turkuaz), The Turkuaz horns (Chris Brouwers, Greg Sanderson, and Josh Schwartz), Scott Flynn (formerly Pretty Lights Live Band), Shira Elias (Turkuaz), Sammi Garrett (Turkuaz), Chuck Jones (Dopapod), Taylor Shell (Turkuaz), and Fro (RAQ).Now, more friends have been added to the mix, with Eli Winderman (Dopapod), Rob Compa (Dopapod) and Danny Mayer (Eric Krasno Band) joining the party. Tickets are available here.The show will also serve to celebrate the life of former Turkuaz keyboardist Stephen Malinowski, who passed away recently at the tragic age of 25. A portion of proceeds will go towards supporting musical education in his honor.Tickets and tables are available here, or enter to win them below.last_img read more

Undergrads collecting degrees, heading abroad

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first_imgOne is headed to India, another will spend a year in Poland, and the third will be in Colombia. This summer, after completing their studies at Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), three graduating seniors will begin yearlong fellowships as part of the Fulbright Scholar program administered by the U.S. Department of State.“It’s remarkable that a small school like ours has produced three Fulbright scholars in a single year,” said Harry R. Lewis, interim dean of Harvard’s SEAS and Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science. He noted that another member of the SEAS class of 2015, computer science concentrator Ruth Fong, will enroll at Oxford University in the fall as a Rhodes Scholar. “They are all stunningly accomplished individuals who are destined to have real positive impact on the world. In fact, they already have.”Joy MingFor Joy Ming, notification from the Fulbright board has meant setting aside plans to start a job as a software engineer for Google in New York City. Instead, she’ll travel to India to work on a project that will assess the usability of a new mobile app designed to smooth the collection of maternal-health data in hospitals and clinics. She’ll be based in Bangalore but will conduct field work in rural regions across the vast subcontinent.It won’t be Ming’s first stint in India. Following her freshman year, through Harvard’s Weissman International Internship Program, she spent a summer interning at a nonprofit in New Delhi researching how community-health workers managed critical patient information.“I was able to see how the technology I was learning in shiny classrooms with new computers was able to help people on the ground where paper is the only thing they have; they don’t even have electricity most of the time,” Ming said. The experience inspired her to start the student-run organization Developers for Development (D4D).“We were going to different [computer science] career fairs where people kept talking about making money, as opposed to making change. I thought, well, I’ve been to rural parts of India. I know that technology can be used to make change and I want other people to know that too.”Today, D4D is a thriving campus group, sponsoring term-time projects, hackathons, internships, and meet-and-greet opportunities for students interested in social impact technology.The club “plays a very important role on campus, in addition to all the good it does in supporting international development,” said Krzysztof Gajos, associate professor of computer science, who has served as faculty adviser to the group and also wrote a Fulbright nomination for Ming. “It provides an excellent illustration of the fact that being a computer scientist is not about sitting locked up in a cubicle. Computer science is a powerful and versatile toolkit, with which one can directly tackle meaningful, real-world problems.”Tyreke WhiteWhen Tyreke White travels to Poland at the end of the summer, it will be the South Carolina native’s first time outside of the United States. Rather than project-based, his Fulbright year will be spent as a teaching assistant at a university, in either Warsaw or Krakow.“My role will be to help students with English language and grammar skills and to be a cultural ambassador,” White said. In addition to his classroom duties, he will run English language and culture clubs.The assignment is a good fit for White’s long-term aspirations and effusive personality. He has served as an academic mentor at the Ed Portal, Harvard’s Allston-based partnership with the city of Boston. He also served two years as a teaching fellow for Math 21a, “Multivariable Calculus,” and Math 21b, “Linear Algebra and Differential Equations.”“Teaching is something I’m passionate about,” he said.White began his Harvard career as a joint astrophysics and earth and planetary sciences concentrator and did a summer internship at New York’s Museum of Natural History, but ultimately switched his concentration to applied math and EPS. Along the way, he said, “I realized that hardcore research wasn’t what I wanted to do. I wanted to do other things ― business, energy, education. I’m interested in a lot of different things.”Amanda ReillyAmanda Reilly ’15 has long been drawn to the intersection of math and science. Between her junior and senior years, the applied math concentrator spent the summer doing “white lab coat” research in Botswana, focusing on HIV. The experience got her interested in infectious diseases and influenced her decision to do her senior thesis on cholera.As a Fulbright Scholar, Reilly will be based at the University of Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia, where her task will be to help assess the efficacy of a needle-exchange program that was recently established to combat HIV among intravenous-drug-using populations. The work will involve visiting needle-exchange sites to collect data that can be used to construct a model.Language should not present a barrier. Having grown up close to the Mexican border, and lived in Chile and Spain, the San Diego native is fluent in Spanish.“The goal is to set up a model to describe — and possibly predict — how well the program is working,” Reilly said. “I’ll be there only 10 months, but my aim is to get a model up and running that will work for years to come. Hopefully, it will be something I can monitor when I come back to U.S., not a one-and-done.”Emily SavageEmily Savage ’15 will graduate this month with an AB and in August she will travel to Taiwan, where she will teach English to students at an elementary or middle school (still to be determined at press time).Savage, who learned about her Fulbright selection from an email that arrived while she was at her part-time job at the Harvard Branch of the national nonprofit Health Leads, selected Taiwan after studying Chinese while at Harvard.“One of my teachers was from Taiwan and I loved hearing her talk about it,” said Savage, who has visited Beijing and loved the experience. “Some of my TFs referred Taiwan as a part of China and some of them thought of it as its own country. I thought that dynamic was very interesting.”Her Fulbright fellowship means that Savage will defer for a year starting work at Bain’s San Francisco office. Having spent the last two summers working in labs — an immunology lab at Harvard Medical School, and in Professor Conor Walsh’s Biodesign Lab where she assisted on a project to develop a robotic glove — Savage said she is “ready for something different.”“I am interested in the business side of biotech,” she said. “I don’t want to be a doctor, but I am very interested in health care technology – figuring out how we can fix those systems. The excellent thing about engineering and why those firms [like Bain] love us is that the problem sets we do and the way we’re taught [at SEAS] allow us to solve any problem.”Longer term, the Bethesda, Md., native has aspirations to start her own company. “I believe the health care space has a lot of improvements that need to be made. I think that is where I’ll end up.”After the Fulbright yearSo what will come after their return to American shores?Reilly imagines two possible paths: a graduate program in infectious diseases, perhaps at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, or medical school. Regardless of the direction she chooses, Reilly said she will pursue a career that allows her to use her quantitative skills. “I tried out the sciences and enjoyed them, but I always came back to applied math. There’s something about the numbers and the way they work that really fascinates me.”White said that he is keeping his options open for now, hoping to use his year in Poland to zero in on a long-term plan. “I can see myself pursuing business or education, or maybe both.”Ming too expects to sort out her true passions during her Fulbright year. “I like the fact that through my project I’ll be able to interact with the social-impact-driven as well as the knowledge-driven, so I can figure out where I fall in the scale,” she said. “I may continue on social-enterprise route,” she added, but “a Ph.D. is not out of the question.”last_img read more

The Second Machine Age: 5 Things Our Kids’ Kids Won’t Know About Transportation

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first_imgWhat it’s like to drive a carWhat it’s like to queue at the Department of Motor VehiclesWhat’s a taxiHow buses had a pre-defined routeHow Top Gear was a show, not the latest fresh garms. There’s a lot of fervor over what some of today’s best business minds are describing as The Second Machine Age. Decades in the making, the Second Machine Age represents another fundamental shift in the way we live, work and, yes, play.Like the first Machine Age, technological innovation and the quest for automation are driving the change, but this time around it will be the automation of information (or ‘knowledge works’) that will define the period, impacting lives on a whole new level of magnitude.In fact, while I was researching electric vehicles this past weekend, it struck me just how tectonic these changes will be and how close they really are, which brought home how every aspect of our lives will be irrevocably different.Cars will be driverless akin to computers on wheels. They’ll be knowledgeable about where you want to go, when you need to be there, what route to take, as well as all about your personal needs or habits, to optimize the experience.In this world, automobile manufacturers all but vanish; high-end cars have morphed into boutique markets for ‘controlled circuits’ and ‘scenic self-drive’ adventures taken exclusively by the nostalgic; and cyber highway robbery has become prolific.Bold statements? Perhaps, but not as far out as you may first think. Remember, at the center of all this is information—made available by the Internet of Things and made intelligent by predictive data analytics and machine learning, as well as a need for automation. So, back to electric cars… bear with me.As part of my research, I surveyed our employees, asking them about their plans for driving electric vehicles. And, as it turns out, rafts of folks have already gone electric, and many more are about to make purchases. The majority of these folks are in California on one of our two main campuses, and pretty much all of them say they have gone electric to get in the Diamond Lane so they can avoid traffic.So, you can assert that people are leaning toward efficient travel over the visceral stimulation of the ride—a trend that parallels the mass adoption of technologies such as the smart phone, virtualization and even cloud. Efficiency is the name of the game.As for me, I went looking at electric cars for my own use and got the data dump on their efficiencies: 100 mile round trips, tax credit, free charging at public locations, rapid charging in two hours, etc.  But I also learned of other features:Email alerts telling you when your car is refilled to a target amount.Mobile apps that give you the ability to warm your car, to exactly the right temp, before you get in.Information at work—and it’s just beginning.Add the Zipcar business model, a touch of Waze and the emergence of self-driving cars from Google, and my predictions for the year 2025 aren’t just possible; they are probable and imminent.As our world careens toward this new reality, scheduling, analytics, tracking, correlation, prediction and protection of assets (both data and people) become critical foundational building blocks. Teasing out operational gems from the ‘Small Data Sprawl’ is the real rock-face of big data. The instantaneous processing of such granular and intimate data drives this transformational wave, but data and orchestration in the wrong hands… well, I believe this needs no explanation to the potential consequences.We have to be able to trust in the Second Machine Age, and, yes, it will be the third platform that will turn this into reality, serving up information anywhere, anytime and with total protection.Folks, we ain’t seen nothing yet. Rulebooks will be re-written; every corner of the technology market will be fundamentally affected. Transportation as a service is around the corner, markets such as healthcare with wearable devices and retail with the Amazon malls will do the same.So, fasten your seatbelts; the ride is about to get interesting.–The concept of “The Second Machine Age” comes from Andrew McAfee and Eric Brynjolfsson at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as expressed in their recently published work The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies.last_img read more

Trained to deal with emergencies, student EMTs utilize compassion in assisting community

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first_imgWhen the Notre Dame Fire Department (NDFD) is called to action, a specially trained group of students is not far behind.Known as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), these students work with NDFD for on-campus emergency situations and engage in activities ranging from dorm life to greater community involvement.Junior Killeen McCans is one of such students, with the group numbering about 10 this semester. “A lot of students don’t really know what we do or who we are at events,” McCans said.EMTs work special activities with NDFD, such as interhall athletic events, the Holy Half race and any boxing event in which individuals are sparring.“We’re often mistaken for athletic trainers, which is a totally different profession with a lot of different qualifications and classes and exams that they have to pass,” McCans said. “We’re really trained to deal with emergencies.”EMTs are also working on the job at larger sporting events, such as football or women’s volleyball.“It’s been a really unique way for me to interact with the Notre Dame community that’s a bit different than how most people interact with it,” senior EMT Hannah Martin said.There are many ways people can become involved with the national EMT program. McCans got her certification in high school, while Martin got her certification in college.“I wanted to be a firefighter in high school and I debated doing that instead of going to college,” Martin said. “But I decided I wanted to go to college because I wanted to go to med school. Overall, definitely the right decision for me, but freshman year, I discovered that we had a student EMT program on campus … so the summer between freshman and sophomore year, I got my EMT certification.”McCans said she has learned many valuable practical skills as an EMT, such as knowing what to do if someone’s heart stops beating or if a child is choking.The EMT position also teaches numerous interpersonal skills, she noted.“You’re often placed in very stressful situations or high-tension situations, and so it taught me a lot about navigating conflict between people [and] how to be a calming presence for someone,” McCans said. “Being able to be with someone and be a calming presence in some of the most stressful moments of their life teaches you a lot about relating to people, a lot about compassion and empathy.”Tags: Emergency Medical Technicians, Notre Dame Fire Departmentlast_img read more

50 Fun Facts About The Sound of Music on the Film’s 50th Anniversary

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first_img View Comments Can you believe that the hills have been alive with The Sound of Music for 50 years? It’s been five decades since the beloved film version of the musical, starring Julie Andrews as an Austrian novice nun-turned-nanny was released in America on March 2, 1965. To celebrate, we’ve rounded up 50 fun Sound of Music facts about the last musical written by legendary theatrical pair Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. So put those arms out and twirl your way through this trip down The Sound of Music memory lane, with help from The Sound of Music FAQ by Barry Monush, Maria Von Trapp: Beyond the Sound of Music by Candice F. Ransom, The Making of The Sound of Music by Max Wilk and more.1. It’s no secret that The Sound of Music was based on a true story, but there were plenty of differences between Maria Kutschera’s 1949 memoir The Story of the Trapp Family Singers and the film. For one thing, Maria was brought to the von Trapp home to care for one child who had scarlet fever and was too ill to walk to school, not all seven children.2. The von Trapps did escape Austria as the Nazis came to power, but they didn’t flee over the Alps, they got on a train to Italy and then traveled to America, where they had a concert tour scheduled. The day after they left, Hitler ordered the Austrian borders shut.3. When they left Austria, Baron von Trapp and Maria had already been married for years and had two children of their own, with another on the way.4. The real Maria was kind of a Mama Rose! She kept the Trapp Family singers together with an iron will.5. When the von Trapps came to America they settled in Stowe, Vermont. They opened the Trapp Family Lodge, which is operational to this day.6. Maria sold the rights to her memoir to German producers who made two films. The Trapp Family and its sequel, The Trapp Family in America, were incredibly popular in post-War West Germany.7. Broadway producer Richard Halliday thought the role of Maria would be great for his wife, Mary Martin, but he originally conceived of it as a play with Austrian folk songs rather than a full musical, written by playwrights Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse.8. Halliday approached musical super-duo Rodgers and Hammerstein about writing one song for the show; they countered with making it a proper musical.9. Because she’d sold the rights to the German producers, Maria and the von Trapps didn’t see any money from The Sound of Music’s success.10. The musical’s original title? The Singing Heart.11. The Sound of Music was the eighth and final musical written by Rodgers and Hammerstein, but Hammerstein never saw the movie. He died of stomach cancer nine months after the Broadway premiere.12. “Edelweiss” was the last song Oscar Hammerstein ever wrote, at the last minute during the show’s tryout in Boston.13. Hammerstein wrote “Edelweiss” for the character of the Captain because he thought original star Theodore Bikel’s talent as a folk musician was being underutilized. The same year Sound of Music opened on Broadway, Bikel co-founded the Newport Folk Festival with Pete Seeger, Oscar Brand and George Wein.14. Audience members were totally convinced that “Edelweiss” was an actual Austrian folk song.15. The Sound of Music opened on Broadway at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre on November 16, 1959. Both major New York critics hated it, finding it way too saccharine, but producers already had $2 million in advance ticket sales so it didn’t really matter.16. During her two years in the Broadway show, Mary Martin only missed one show.17. Due to the design of the two-story set, Martin had to run three miles during every show to make her entrances and exits.18. The play won six Tony Awards, including Best Musical and a third Best Actress for Martin (she already had trophies for South Pacific and Peter Pan).19. Even though two of the von Trapp children were boys, the entire children’s cast was nominated in the Best Featured Actress category as a single nominee. They lost out to Mother Abbess, Patricia Neway.20. The original cast recording of The Sound of Music was nearly as popular as the show itself. Recorded just a week after the show’s Broadway premiere and released by Columbia Records, the album was number one on the Billboard charts for 16 weeks.21. When it came to the movie, Julie Andrews wasn’t the first choice for Maria! Producers wanted Grace Kelly or Doris Day to replace her. Mary Poppins (for which Andrews would win an Oscar) hadn’t hit screens yet and they didn’t know if she had the star power to carry the feature film. (Day ruled herself out as “too American.”)22. Sean Connery, Richard Burton and Bing Crosby were in the running to play Captain von Trapp, before the role went to relative newcomer Christopher Plummer.23. Patti Duke, Mia Farrow, Sharon Tate and Geraldine Chaplin all auditioned for the role of Leisl, which eventually went to Charmian Carr.24. Kurt Russell and Richard Dreyfuss also auditioned to be von Trapp children.25. Kym Karath, who played little Gretl, was already a film vet when she auditioned for The Sound of Music. She was feeling so adult that for her audition she sang “Sixteen Going on Seventeen.” She was five.26. After Oscar Hammerstein’s death, Richard Rodgers wrote two new songs for the film (“I Have Confidence” and “Something Good”) by himself.27. Christopher Plummer never cared for the movie. He thought it would compromise his reputation as a serious Shakespearean actor.28. Plummer admitted he developed a crush on co-star Andrews when he saw her in My Fair Lady on Broadway, but called working with her like “being hit over the head with a big Valentine’s Day card, every day.”29. William Wyler, the film’s original director, quit to work on another movie and that’s probably a good thing. Wyler was apparently a little deaf and planned to make the piece a somber film that focused more on the war.30. While filming the iconic opening scene, twirling in the hills of Austria, Andrews kept getting knocked down in the mud by the gusts from the helicopter carrying the camera.31. Charmian Carr slipped and fell through a window in the gazebo while filming “Sixteen Going on Seventeen.” Her bandaged ankle had to be airbrushed out in later versions of the film.32. When the boat carrying the von Trapp brood tipped over, Kym Karath, who played Gretl, nearly drowned because she couldn’t swim. She swallowed a lot of water, which she then threw up all over co-star Heather Menzies, who played Louisa.33. “Edelweiss” was so good that film director Robert Wise also thought it was a real Austrian folk song. When they were shooting the scene at the Salzburg music festival, filming was delayed for hours while hundreds of Austrian extras were taught the words.34. Also during that scene, Plummer was drunk.35. If you look closely at the film, you’ll spot the real Maria von Trapp in a cameo, walking past a stone archway while Julie Andrews sings “I Have Confidence.”36. In one of Maria von Trapp’s memoirs, she wrote that she wasn’t invited to the premiere of the film, and producers couldn’t find her a seat when she asked.37. One of Maria’s biggest beefs with the film was with the geography. Not only does Salzburg not border on Switzerland, but taking that route out of Austria would have sent them straight towards Berchtesgaden, Hitler’s summer retreat.38. She also thought both Martin and Andrews made her seem to sweet, calling them “too gentle-like girls out of Bryn Mawr.”39. Maria von Trapp taught Julie Andrews how to yodel for real on The Julie Andrews Hour.40. The Sound of Music won five Oscars in 1965, including Best Picture. It’s one of only four films ever to win a Tony Award for Best Play or Musical, and later win Best Picture.41. Adjusted for inflation, it’s one of the highest grossing films ever made, right behind Gone With the Wind and Star Wars.42. It had the longest first run in U.S. cinemas ever at four and a half years.43. Charmian Carr, who played Liesl, went on to become an interior designer for celebrities, including Ernest Lehman and Michael Jackson.44. Heather Menzies, who played Louisa, worked in TV for years and went on to pose for Playboy.45. A 1981 West End revival starred Petula Clark as Maria.46. There’s only been one Broadway revival of The Sound of Music, in 1998 starring Rebecca Luker as Maria. A young Laura Benanti made her Broadway debut as a postulant and Luker’s understudy.47. Andrew Lloyd Webber almost got Scarlett Johansson to star in a 2006 London revival. When the plan fell through, Webber cast the role of Maria via his reality show How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria?48. ScarJo is in good celeb company when it comes to loving The Sound of Music—Elton John once held a private sing-along for his birthday.49. The 2013 live TV version, starring Carrie Underwood as Maria, helped reinvigorate a new era of musicals on screen. It didn’t hurt that the cast also had legit Broadway cred, including Laura Benanti as Elsa Schrader, Audra McDonald as Mother Abbess and Christian Borle as Max Detweiler.50. Even before Lady Gaga’s killer Sound of Music tribute at the Oscars, Andrews says she was a fan of the pop star. Now they’ve bonded and become new friends.last_img read more

Ag Forecast 2014

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first_imgThe 2014 Georgia Ag Forecast seminar series will be held Jan. 24-31 in Macon, Athens, Lyons, Tifton, Bainbridge and Cartersville. Registration for the series is open at www.georgiaagforecast.com “It helps farmers plan what they’re going to plant in the next year, but it’s also good for bankers and other businesspeople who do business with farmers or who will impacted by the farm economy.” Economists from the center and the UGA department of agriculture and applied economics will deliver the forecasts, which look at Georgia’s major commodities and the way that global markets, weather patterns and historical trends will affect them. “The main objective of the Ag Forecast is to provide Georgia’s producers and agribusiness leaders with information on where we think the industry is headed in the upcoming year,” said Kent Wolfe, director of the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. In addition to the annual Ag Forecast overview, attorney Will Thompson will speak on farm succession planning and offer advice for farmers and agribusiness owners on how to pass their businesses on to the next generation. Agriculture—the biggest industry in Georgia—has an impact that is felt throughout the state’s economy. In January, University of Georgia economists will break down the complicated web of factors that impact the state’s agriculture and give farmers and business leaders a preview of the 2014 growing season. The 2014 Ag Forecast sessions will be held Jan. 24 in Macon, Jan. 27 in Athens, Jan. 28 in Lyons, Jan. 29 in Tifton, Jan. 30 in Bainbridge and Jan. 31 in Cartersville. The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Georgia Farm Bureau and Georgia Department of Agriculture sponsor the annual seminar series, and its attendance grows every year. Last year, almost 1,000 business people, farmers and community leaders attended their local events. For more information on the 2014 Ag Forecast, see www.georgiaagforecast.com or follow @UGA_CollegeofAg on Twitter. ###last_img read more